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Old Dec 20, 2009, 5:30 AM   #51
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nice shots. One more thing to consider. Get a nice neoprene camera strap, they actually make a world of difference between the free one they package in the camera.
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Old Dec 20, 2009, 9:48 AM   #52
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Good Morning, Justin-

While we are indeed, thousands of miles away, it is at least morning here on the west coast of the USA, so I wanted to wish you a good morning.

You mentioned the 25mm lens as one lens that really appealled to you. I own both the 25mm Panasonic F 1.7, and the 25mm Olympus F 2.8 lenses. I particularly like them for the times when I really want to travel lightly. As a result the 25mm have become one of my favorite lenses on both the G-1 and the E-620. You also should not overlook the macro capabilities of the 25mm lens as well. Here is a summer time flower example done with the 25mm Olympus lens.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Dec 20, 2009, 10:01 AM   #53
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Justin-

I believe that the delay in receiving the E-620 may indeed be a blessing in disguise. It gives you more time to sort out things, just as you were able to do on the Cameron Highlands trip.

The Nikon D-3000 did initially appear small and compact when looking at it with just the Nikon 18-55mm kit lens. However, when any other lens is mounted on the D-3000 it becomes quite a bit bigger. Yes, there are lots of Nikon lenses, but the D-3000 is restricted to the Nikon AF-S and a few AF-I type lenses.

Regarding the G-series cameras, yes, there is indeed an adaptation required to either do all framing on the LCD, or to be at peace with using the EVF. It is a somewhat different mindset.

The several weeks before new stocks are available that include the E-620 cameras will allow you to sort things out with the other cameras you are considering. I will close with a photo of our winter time seas that we experience her along the southern Oregon coast line. This was taken from our back deck with the Olympus E-620 equipped with the 50-200mm lens.

Have a great day and a Merry Christmas.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Dec 20, 2009, 11:39 AM   #54
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nice shots. One more thing to consider. Get a nice neoprene camera strap, they actually make a world of difference between the free one they package in the camera.
Thank you and will do consider your suggestion of a neoprene camera strap.

Bought your wife the E-P1 yet?

Justin.
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Old Dec 20, 2009, 12:00 PM   #55
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Good Morning, Justin-

While we are indeed, thousands of miles away, it is at least morning here on the west coast of the USA, so I wanted to wish you a good morning.

You mentioned the 25mm lens as one lens that really appealled to you. I own both the 25mm Panasonic F 1.7, and the 25mm Olympus F 2.8 lenses. I particularly like them for the times when I really want to travel lightly. As a result the 25mm have become one of my favorite lenses on both the G-1 and the E-620. You also should not overlook the macro capabilities of the 25mm lens as well. Here is a summer time flower example done with the 25mm Olympus lens.

Sarah Joyce
Good morning to you too Sarah. Right now, it is 12:41 AM (past midnight in Penang, Malaysia).

Yup, they appeal to me due to their slim design and helps with portability. Not to mention also they are both fast prime lenses (more so for the Panasonic), and this will go well with dinner outings or dates in not so well lit conditions (e.g. inside restaurants)

A Panasonic 20mm F/1.7 or Olympus 25mm F/2.8 plus their respective kit lenses will be good enough for me for a long time.

That's a lovely picture. Way better than mine, haha! I shall strive to do better

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Justin-

I believe that the delay in receiving the E-620 may indeed be a blessing in disguise. It gives you more time to sort out things, just as you were able to do on the Cameron Highlands trip.

The Nikon D-3000 did initially appear small and compact when looking at it with just the Nikon 18-55mm kit lens. However, when any other lens is mounted on the D-3000 it becomes quite a bit bigger. Yes, there are lots of Nikon lenses, but the D-3000 is restricted to the Nikon AF-S and a few AF-I type lenses.
Blessing in disguise it is

I find that the D3000 is small when compared to the D100, however, even after attaching a 35mm to the D3000, it is still no where near 'portable' or sleek and safe enough to carry out at night during dinners. For example, I just got back from my mom's birthday dinner. I would instinctively think twice about bringing a D3000 (kit lens or 35mm) to the dinner but would not hesitate to screw on a pancake lens on the GF1/EP1/EP2 or even the E-620.

And when I start charting out and listing the lenses that I may/intend to use in the near future, micro 4/3 and 4/3 lenses are just smaller and lighter than their APS-C counterparts. The difference I can foresee is 'fit all in a belt pouch' or 'fit all in a shoulder bag/backpack'.

The D3000 is indeed a good camera, but not for what, when and where I want to use it for.

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Regarding the G-series cameras, yes, there is indeed an adaptation required to either do all framing on the LCD, or to be at peace with using the EVF. It is a somewhat different mindset.
Yup. This is the fear that I am having that I may not adapt the different mindset. I am quite at ease with bringing it up to eye level to use the viewfinder. Will try to look around for a GF1 and attach the EVF to test it. Even better, an E-P2 with its EVF too.

Using just the pancake lens and composing with the LCD is no biggie for me. However, I don't know how to when using the kit lens or anything bigger (e.g. the Panasonic 14-150mm or Olympus 14-54 MKII lenses). It seems 'awkward' composing using the LCD with zoom lenses attached.

Hence why I find having an attached EVF will allow me to bring the camera to eye level and closer to my body like how I would hold a normal DSLR and help with stabilising the camera. Don't see any other ways to it. Do you?

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The several weeks before new stocks are available that include the E-620 cameras will allow you to sort things out with the other cameras you are considering. I will close with a photo of our winter time seas that we experience her along the southern Oregon coast line. This was taken from our back deck with the Olympus E-620 equipped with the 50-200mm lens.

Have a great day and a Merry Christmas.

Sarah Joyce
You have that for a view from your back deck?! Nice shot and even nicer view - especially one where you can look at every day and night.

You have a good one too and a merry christmas to you.

Justin.
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Old Dec 20, 2009, 2:03 PM   #56
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The one thing about the ep-1 is that if you use the external view finder, you are not looking through the lens view, or you will be using the lcd like a point an shoot to see the lens view. Something to consider also.

Not yet on the ep-1, she likes the leica more.
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Old Dec 20, 2009, 2:17 PM   #57
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Justin,

you mentioned earlier the difference between the EP-1 and 2. the major difference is the port on the EP-2 for the included EVF, which is actually quite a high resolution EVF, i think its about 4x the resolution of the optional EVF for the GF-1. And is about the same price as the GF-1 with the optional EVF.

For you, I believe the EP-2 to be the best bet between it and the GF-1 simply due to to the oly jpeg engine and the higher resolution EVF. Also, when you need to cut down on th size, you can take the EVF off. Giving you the flexibility of EVF when you have the space and time, and when you need something discreet and compact, you can make due with the LCD for composition.

Sarah and sho make good arguments for the 620 and i believe it to be a great camera. Just seems like you were offput by the size and bulk of a DSLR, and while it is small, the 620 is still a DSLR and especially with lenses, it is quite a bit larger than the micro 4/3. which are able to keep their lens sizes smaller due the shorter flang distance (no mirror)
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Old Dec 21, 2009, 6:18 AM   #58
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The one thing about the ep-1 is that if you use the external view finder, you are not looking through the lens view, or you will be using the lcd like a point an shoot to see the lens view. Something to consider also.

Not yet on the ep-1, she likes the leica more.
Hi shoturtle,

Yup. I noticed that. I tried out the E-P1 with its optical viewfinder - it does what it is supposed to do, but doesn't display any information whatsoever. It just helps you 'frame' the picture. I'll try to get my hands on a GF1 with the viewfinder and an E-P2 with the viewfinder.

Oh boy, the shop assistants are going to hate me for trying and not buying I envy you all with your option of having 30 day back returns with no questions asked. Here in Malaysia, once bought, that's it. No returns, no exchanges. Hence why I am quite apprehensive in purchasing a DSLR and post so many questions which seems to be going round in circles. Nevertheless, I'll be thick skinned and will face the assistant

Justin.

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Old Dec 21, 2009, 10:37 AM   #59
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Justin,

you mentioned earlier the difference between the EP-1 and 2. the major difference is the port on the EP-2 for the included EVF, which is actually quite a high resolution EVF, i think its about 4x the resolution of the optional EVF for the GF-1. And is about the same price as the GF-1 with the optional EVF.

For you, I believe the EP-2 to be the best bet between it and the GF-1 simply due to to the oly jpeg engine and the higher resolution EVF. Also, when you need to cut down on th size, you can take the EVF off. Giving you the flexibility of EVF when you have the space and time, and when you need something discreet and compact, you can make due with the LCD for composition.

Sarah and sho make good arguments for the 620 and i believe it to be a great camera. Just seems like you were offput by the size and bulk of a DSLR, and while it is small, the 620 is still a DSLR and especially with lenses, it is quite a bit larger than the micro 4/3. which are able to keep their lens sizes smaller due the shorter flang distance (no mirror)
Hi Hards80,

Yup, it seems the biggest difference between E-P1 and E-P2 is only the EVF. The E-P1/2 EVF is also significantly better as compared to GF1's copy. No other significant changes based on what I have read. However, the focusing speed between both are the same (slower) and that the GF1 is faster than both.

One thing that is swaying me more towards the micro 4/3 system is due to the Panasonic 20mm F/1.7 prime lens. Nothing in the 4/3 system has such a lens in such a compact size (Panasonic and Sigma have faster lenses but much much bigger and longer). And there is no adapter for 4/3 bodies to use m4/3 lenses either.

The versatility of m4/3 system is also attractive: screw on a zoom lens and viewfinder for the day out shooting and screw on just the pancake lens for indoor or night/social outings. Coupled the above and with my aversion for flash usage (Panasonic 20mm F/1.7 lens) and tripod use (image stabilisation) and requirement for a viewfinder (EVF) and Olympus JPEG engine, it seems that the E-P1 or E-P2 is the right choice for me.

However, my concern is of the focusing speed of the E-P1 and E-P2 as compared to the GF1. It seems that reviews are giving the E-P1/2 some heat due to its slower focusing speed and are putting the GF1 on a pedestal as it trumps it. Anybody has thoughts or experience in this? Should I be concerned?

Oh my oh my, decisions decisions Justin.

Last edited by JustinY; Dec 21, 2009 at 12:24 PM.
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Old Dec 21, 2009, 2:22 PM   #60
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Hi Hards80,

Yup, it seems the biggest difference between E-P1 and E-P2 is only the EVF. The E-P1/2 EVF is also significantly better as compared to GF1's copy. No other significant changes based on what I have read. However, the focusing speed between both are the same (slower) and that the GF1 is faster than both.

One thing that is swaying me more towards the micro 4/3 system is due to the Panasonic 20mm F/1.7 prime lens. Nothing in the 4/3 system has such a lens in such a compact size (Panasonic and Sigma have faster lenses but much much bigger and longer). And there is no adapter for 4/3 bodies to use m4/3 lenses either.

The versatility of m4/3 system is also attractive: screw on a zoom lens and viewfinder for the day out shooting and screw on just the pancake lens for indoor or night/social outings. Coupled the above and with my aversion for flash usage (Panasonic 20mm F/1.7 lens) and tripod use (image stabilisation) and requirement for a viewfinder (EVF) and Olympus JPEG engine, it seems that the E-P1 or E-P2 is the right choice for me.

However, my concern is of the focusing speed of the E-P1 and E-P2 as compared to the GF1. It seems that reviews are giving the E-P1/2 some heat due to its slower focusing speed and are putting the GF1 on a pedestal as it trumps it. Anybody has thoughts or experience in this? Should I be concerned?

Oh my oh my, decisions decisions Justin.
Hey Justin,

Just to follow-up and clarify a few things.

The Olympus EVF works only on the EP-2 (not the EP-1), so if you want the EVF in an Olympus, you will have to get the EP-2.

Focus speed is faster on the Panasonic, that is a fact. However, for your intended usage, of landscapes, general get-together, and street photography, the Olympus would be more than up to those tasks.

So it looks like the EP-2 kit and then adding the Panasonic 20 1.7 would be a good kit for your needs.
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