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Old Dec 11, 2009, 3:33 PM   #1
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Default Olympus E-620 vs. Nikon D90 vs. Nikon D5000

I was trained as a photographer and have been using film up until now. Now that I have fewer places to get film developed I am looking at buying a DSLR. I have money constraints as does everyone! Mine are worse than most.

I am looking at the e-620 and the d90 primarily. My heart had been set on the d90, but I figure it will be replaced in the next 9 months. I like the e-620 due to its form factors. I don't understand what 4:3 is? The D5000 seems to much of a beginners camera, and I don't like anything that is menu dependent. I know the e-620 has many menus too, but I also know that Olympus makes great cameras ask does Nikon.

I need help from the outside to figure this out. I have to decide by tonight or early tomorrow! So please respond ASAP. I am a fairly seasoned photograher. I have been shooting pictures since I was 9, and moved up to an very old rangefinders by the age of 13. I majored in photography in high school and college, and love to carry a camera on me at all times. I figured the Olympus leaves me enough money to still get a P&S. I am very picky about picture quality! I will shoot the impossible to see if it can be done, and I usually accomplish it. I also need a camera to shoot the jewelry that I make. Which means it needs to be able to do macro. So please help me in this decision.
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Old Dec 11, 2009, 3:49 PM   #2
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You need to provide a little more information on the types of photography you do. Of note: as you know from your existing experience, macro photography is more about the lens than the camera. Both cameras are capable of macro photography, but the macro capability of the lens is more important - and for something like jewelry, the surface / background and light tent are more important than the DSLR body you use. So, what types of photography do you do - portrait, action, landscape, wildlife? The idea is to determine if your specific photographic needs are more suited towards one camera/system over the other.
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Old Dec 11, 2009, 4:09 PM   #3
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While I'm not a big fan of Wikipedia... their page on the fourth-thirds format is concise, understandable... and fair:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Thirds_system

Most digital SLRs have an APS-C sized sensor (see the comparative diagram on the Wiki page). Although some expensive digital SLRs have "full frame" sensors - that is, sensors the size of a traditional 35mm film frame.

The theoretical advantage of large sensors is room for larger pixels for any given resolution (10 megapixels, 12 megapixels, etc). That usually means less "noise" (or "grain," to take a term from film. The Wiki page goes into more detail.
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Old Dec 11, 2009, 4:30 PM   #4
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What camera and lenses do you have now? If you already have a few lenses for your film camera, you can save some/a lot of money just getting a body which can take these lenses. Almost any modern camera is capable of taking good quality shots, so it's more about your specific requirements towards lenses and accessories and your personal preferences. Oly has an in-body image stabilizer, Nikon has a better low light/high ISO IQ and a much larger selection of lenses - your choice
I used Oly and Nikon film cameras, but with digital switched to Canon. At the end it doesn't really make much difference what brand you use, but how you use it. Think about the lenses and accessories you will need, then decide what body to get.
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Old Dec 11, 2009, 4:39 PM   #5
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what film camera system do you have, as an example. I just recent switch over to digital from a film slr. I was looking at the d5000, d90, e620, and t1i. One of the reason I went with the t1i as my film eos lenses work with it. The e620 was my second choice, i like what they package into the camera. So if you have an investment in lenses already, you my want to look into a camera that your lenses for will work on.

4:2 is an aspect ratio.
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Old Dec 11, 2009, 5:24 PM   #6
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I currently have a Nikon FE with a 35-105 lens, a 50 mm lens, and a 135 lens. All are Nikkor. The 35-105, I bought in 1986 in NYC and it should work with the D90m, I think. My old P&S is an Olympus Stylus Zoom with a 35-105 lens that I have snuck into more basketball games than I can tell you about. I like to shoot architecture, scenery, a lot of outdoor pics. I also shoot humor while driving. The oddities you find in signage. I love nature photos, and abstract architecture to clarify! I have also done toy photography. I have done one or two concerts at House of Blues (very dark in there), and lots of action on the musicians part. I hope that helps.
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Old Dec 11, 2009, 5:56 PM   #7
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I not sure if it will work, which lens is it exactly? If it is does not work with the newer nikon, then the glass question is not a concern. You will be choosing more then just a camera, you are choosing a system.

The D90 is allot heavier then the e620, while shooting humor, it may be a bit bulky to deal with. The D90 is a higher end camera. It has a faster burst rate 4.5 fps vs 4fps of the olympus. The D90 with the 18-105 is also 300 bucks more then the olympus with two lenses. Low light the D90 is better with higher iso at 6400. It has the same resolution sensor as the D5000.

The E620 has a very good jpeg engine. And a ton of in camera filters and options. If you are not into post production editing with photoshop or aperture.

On paper the D90 is the better camera.
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Old Dec 11, 2009, 7:13 PM   #8
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From the Nikon Webpage on D90 lens compatibility:

1) DX AF NIKKOR: All functions possible
2) D-/G-type AF NIKKOR (excluding IX NIKKORlenses): All functions possible (excluding PC Micro- NIKKOR)
3) AF NIKKOR other than D-/G-type (excluding lenses for F3AF): All functions except 3D-Color Matrix Metering II possible
4) AI-P NIKKOR: All functions except Autofocus, 3D-Color Matrix Metering II possible
5) Non-CPU AI NIKKOR: Autofocus not supported. Can be used in exposure modes A and M but exposure meter does not function. Electronic range finder can be used if maximum aperture is 5.6 or faster; Color Matrix Metering and aperture value display supported if user provides.
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Old Dec 11, 2009, 7:20 PM   #9
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To shoot your jewelry, you'll need a relatively short macro lens.Olympus has a 35mm f/3.5 macro lens that should work well and it's relatively inexpensive. Olympus also has a 50mm f/2.0 1:2 macro lens for $500. Nikon has some very good macro lenses but they're all longer. Even accounting for the difference in sensor size, I think the Olympus E-620 with the 35/3.5 macro lens would be a better deal.
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Old Dec 12, 2009, 11:18 AM   #10
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Here is a review of the e620 it did not do to bad at 1600iso

http://www.digitalcamerareview.com/d...w=olympus+e620
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