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Old Dec 29, 2009, 11:00 PM   #1
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Default My first DSLR

I have a Nikon P90 and find that it's lacking in the areas my wife and I want to create great photos. Even after fine tuning settings, shots are good, but not great. There's always some noise in low light, and the depth of field isn't quite what we want. After doing some research it seems that some of these are due to limitations of point-and-shoot cameras compared to DSLRs. With that said, we were looking at the Nikon D3000 mostly for it's ease of use. However, I see a lot of mixed reviews. I am also considering the D5000 which seems to be a solid camera.

Are there a lot of major differences between the D3000 and the D5000? I mean is it worth the extra couple of hundred dollars for the 5000 over the 3000? The pivoting screen of the D5000 isn't a necessity, nor is the video capability, and to be honest, the advertised ease of use is really the only thing steering me towards the D3000. I just dont want to be in a position of splurging on the D5000 and my wife and I being stuck with a hard to use camera.

**Edit** The primary use of this camera will be to photgraph our children, an active 2.5 year old an 8 month old, with some occasional landscape and macro sprinkled in.

Last edited by fbords; Dec 29, 2009 at 11:05 PM. Reason: added more details
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Old Dec 29, 2009, 11:21 PM   #2
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The D5000 is a way better camera. It will out perform the D3000 in the low light arena where you seem to like shooting with a 6400 iso, so the nikon d5000 handles noise better then the D3000. Also it has a better sensor. The D5000 compete head to head with the canon T1i, their top of the line in the rebel line up. The d3000 has a iso 3200, but this is not where the camera performs.

The D5000 at 12mp will also give you better resolution then D3000 at 10mp, if you do editing with software the add resolution help out imagine quality. This D5000 will not be a dslr that you will out grow if you get deeper into photograph

It has a similar limiting factor like the d3000 when it comes to lenses, as it will not work with the whole nikon lens line up. It will work with the af-s and af-i series lenses only.

So if you are willing to spend the extra, the d5000 will do more, and most likely give you better pictures then the d3000. But if you want to save some money, the d3000 will do the job, just not as well in indoor and low light situations. But still will out perform your current P&S.

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Old Dec 29, 2009, 11:30 PM   #3
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Thanks. I know that both are far better than what I have now. My number one concern is picking up the D3000 and a few weeks/months down the line, finding myself constrained again and wanting more. Likewise, I dont want to just spend the extra money on the D5000 just because it costs more and is "supposed" to be better. I want to ensure that if I'm making the investment, it will serve my needs and make us happy for years to come.

Can you elaborate on what makes the D5000 better? You mentioned that it is better in low light, but what else can it do, that the D3000 struggles with or can't do at all?

Does anyone know typical resale value for Nikon DSLRs? I know that it's typical to buy some body/lens outfits, then upgrade down the line. I'm just curious if what I buy now will serve any good for resale in a few years when/if I look to upgrade to a better device.

Anyone have any experience with larger print sizes from photos taken with either of these cameras? We're looking to decorate our home with some self made portraits, and nature photos also, and I was curious as to how large they can be made realistically.

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Old Dec 29, 2009, 11:41 PM   #4
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It has a better auto focus system. The improve sensor, beside great resolution bring out the color better then the D3000.

The higher ISO will allow the D5000 to take photos indoor and at night where a flash is not advisable or if you want a different effect. Because a flash freeze the shot.

Here is an example of shooting at a higher iso that d3000 would have some problems with while the d5000 will do. Just a note, I took this with a canon t1i.
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Old Dec 29, 2009, 11:45 PM   #5
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Nikon decided on have a 2 tier "entery level" dslr line, while canon, sony and olympus has 3 tiers. So the step up is a bit harder hit to the wallet then with the other brands.
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Old Dec 30, 2009, 12:08 AM   #6
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Thought I would take a quick snap form my window showing the difference between 16-6400. So actually here is bit better example of the different between iso 3200 and 6400, I try taking it a 1600 but there were next to no details. first one is 3200 2nd one is at 6400. I know that these are lousy pics. But you can see that at 6400 you get more details. I used a bright lens and it was hand held.
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Old Dec 30, 2009, 12:20 AM   #7
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do you think the 18-55mm VR lens it comes with is a good starting point for this camera? I know far more about the bodies of these devices (though my knowledge is limited), than I do about the lenses themselves.
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Old Dec 30, 2009, 12:26 AM   #8
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The kit lenses are quite good for general purpose and they are all VC so you have vibration control to compensate for hand shake. It is a very good starting point. Once you develop more into dslr, and know the direction you want to go, you can then get lenses more suite for that direction. And for most of your shooting it they will do quite a good job.

Also check out this site, I found it when I was helping my brother who is looking to move form dslr. He found the youtube workshop quite good for a new dslr owner.

www.dslrtips.com
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Old Dec 30, 2009, 12:32 AM   #9
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You seem to have had your share of experiences with different model DSLRs. How does the D5000 compare to other similar models in it's class? is it comparable to sony, and canon's models, or does it exceed/fall behind them?

by the way, excellent website recommendation

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Old Dec 30, 2009, 12:52 AM   #10
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Actually I just recently switch from a film slr to a dslr. So I was doing allot of research between camera brands earlier in the year. I actually borrow or rented about 8 cameras and took them out on shooting days.

I found the D5000 lens limitation bother me. But overall quality of the photos to be better then the sony a380, on par with the olympus e620, and maybe slightly behind the canon t1i as the canon had more vivid color though a bit more nosie. Against the consumer lines of so call "entry level" is a very good camera. The pentax k-x was not out. It is a bit behind the next tier cameras like the canon 50d, nikon d90, olympus e-30 and pentex k-7, but that is to be expected giving they are a higher grade camera.

But at the end of the day, between the "entry level" camera. They were all pretty much on par. Some did stuff bit better in on department while the other did better in another. My decision for the t1i was I perfer the look of the photos it took, as I found it more pleasing to my eye. The olympus was also pleasing to me. Remember everyones eye are different. So it came to to personal preference of the photos and ergos, because honestly they really are very well match cameras in the top tier of the entry level market. But the D5000 was not left behind in any department in performance. It has a great AF system, low light ability, and had a very fast burst rate for cameras in this class better then the canon.

If you are considering the d5000 seriously you will not be disappointed in its abilities.
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