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Old Dec 30, 2009, 4:00 PM   #1
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Default Thanks for all the advice but... Still need help

Thanks to all that assisted with the last posting that I made in my search for a SLR camera. First I've done a little more research and second can give a little more detail of what I will be using it for. Even though I am moving up from a 15 yr old P and S Pentax I think that I want to go SLR and not intermidate.
What will I mainly be doing:
1. Stay within the 500 to 600 price range so that my wife won't kill me
2. Mostly will be used for indoors( Family events and Hoildays) and also for vacations a couple of times a year. If I am correct I need one with a good ISO in order to acheive quality in low light situations.
3. I now understand that instead of buying a camera I am buying into a system for the future Thanks TCAV. So not having to buy new lenses if I upgrade years down the road is a plus.
4. I/S seems to be a topic of choice kinda like Ford or GM. Whether in the lens or in the body. Does it really make that much of a difference one to the other or is it personal perference?
5. Finally portabality, My wife and I will be taking our first ever cruise next year and I want to take it along and get some great photo(Memories)

So here are my current choices and would like expert opinion and feedback from the experts in the forum. Cannon XSI, Nikon D5000 (Price may be issue) Olympus E520 or maybe E620.
I didnt chose a Pentax because no one carries the SLR line anywhere close to me and I was afraid the support and accessories would be an issue.
Thanks and now I defer to the experts:
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Old Dec 30, 2009, 4:23 PM   #2
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For what you want to do, I think the dSLRs you've narrowed your selection down to, are equally capable to serve your needs. I will say that the Canon and the Olympus have better kit lenses, but additional lenses and accessories for Olympus are few and expensive. From that perspective, I think the Canon would be the best choice. But the D5000 can record the occasional video if you want.
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Old Dec 30, 2009, 7:39 PM   #3
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It's too bad that you've taken the Pentax K-x out of the equation. It would probably work very well for you, but I can understand being worried about support. I shoot Pentax and used to buy quite a bit of stuff from a local shop, but they no longer carry Pentax in store (sigh). Now I order my stuff from B&H, Adorama or Amazon. As far as support - Pentax has a very friendly bunch of people who hang out on a couple of bulletin boards (including this one). They've been far more use to me than the camera store ever was.

But since you have, I think the Oly would work fine but the sample pictures I've seen at higher ISOs seem to have a bit more noise. It's not hugely different and could be managed with software, but if one of your primary uses is indoors, I think the Canon or Nikon should start off ranking higher, if the ergonomics are OK. If you prefer the size and feel of the Oly, then get it instead as I think the ergonomics are more important than the little bit of extra noise of the Oly at higher ISO levels.

Is there a reason you aren't considering a Sony?

As far as image stabilization - someone shooting sports would put it about last as they will usually be using fast enough shutter speeds that camera shake isn't a problem. Those using flash all the time would also not care much about it. Where it comes in very handy is if you are shooting in low light at slow shutter speeds without a tripod. Then camera shake becomes a problem. So how important stabilization IS a personal thing - it all depends on what the photographer is going to be doing. I'm often shooting at slow shutter speeds, so it's very high on my list of priorities. And since I depend on older lenses much of the time, I appreciate in-camera stabilization.
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Old Dec 30, 2009, 9:00 PM   #4
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To answer your question about Sony it was really due to the fact that the 2 that I did handle it didn't like. Also a few people that I taked to had the same concerns about Sony that you mentioned. Thanks
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Old Dec 30, 2009, 9:03 PM   #5
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Thanks TCav and I will say that I agree with the statement that "If I want to shoot video I would use a camcorder and not a camera". I think that you said that but I may be wrong. Thanks
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Old Dec 30, 2009, 9:12 PM   #6
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Good enough reason for knocking out Sony - you won't use a camera if you don't like the feel (I didn't like the viewfinder on the Sony dSLR cameras that had live view - they were too small for me to use comfortably).
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Old Dec 31, 2009, 6:13 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by powelldb1 View Post
Thanks TCav and I will say that I agree with the statement that "If I want to shoot video I would use a camcorder and not a camera". I think that you said that but I may be wrong. Thanks
That sounds like me.
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Old Dec 31, 2009, 5:59 PM   #8
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I found a Cannon XS at BB for 514 that comes with a 18-55mm lens. I also found one for about 100 dollars more that comes with 2 lens 18-55 and 70-200mm. Is it worth the extra to get the seconf lens?
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Old Dec 31, 2009, 6:08 PM   #9
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70-200? Probably not.

If it's the Canon 75-300, skip it. If it's the 55-250, jump all over it!
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Old Dec 31, 2009, 6:25 PM   #10
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it is the 75-300 so I will take your advice. Also I can get a XSI for around the same money. Will keep looking but I will probably take the XSI for the same money
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