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Old Jan 28, 2010, 8:16 AM   #1
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Default sony fd200 macro shots 2.0 meg vrs h20?hx1

gonna post these couple macro shots out my sony fd200.this is only a 2meg camera .these are taken in macro mode 640by480.i love this camera for its close up ability.i use this camera nearly daily.
i am shopping for a new camera but honestly.i might keep this around.
what you think?

Shot at 2009-09-27


By null at 2006-12-08



By null, shot with FDMAVICA at 2008-12-27

By null, shot with FDMAVICA at 2008-04-01

i do not use a flash when taking close up shots .this is a 2.0 meg sony fd200.thats right a floppy camera with memory stick.i take alot of closeups for ebay sales and other internet sales i do .

so can i expect these same quality shots out of say the dsc h20?
the dsc hx1?
these are the cameras i am looking at .will both these do a macro as good or better than these?


ps- if anyone has macro shots from a h20 or hx1 thats not of birds,flowers,or other outdoorsy things please post them for me to see.i am looking for your average everyday user macro shots of ordinary things .unlike birds,flowers,ect........most all my shooting is for internet sales.thanks

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Old Jan 28, 2010, 2:00 PM   #2
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moved this to "what camera should i buy" you should have more information here
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Old Jan 28, 2010, 2:37 PM   #3
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John-

I am happy to help out. Here is a H-20 macro or close-up sample.It has various textures, colors, and type faces to allow for good judgment of the image quality. The HX-1 has not arrived yet. When it arrives I will also provide a sample from that camera as soon as it arrives.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jan 29, 2010, 10:50 AM   #4
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thanks sara,that close up looks good to me
i can get pretty close with my mavica .about a half inch to subject.
thanks again.

joe

what you think about the closeups out this 2 meg mavica?i think they are great .hence why i am still using a 2.0 camera.i do alot of closeups.
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Old Jan 29, 2010, 12:11 PM   #5
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Joe-

Yes indeed there a few select "old timer" cameras out there that are noted for the close-up photos.However, the H-20 is no slouch.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jan 31, 2010, 11:44 AM   #6
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Default Macro Consumer Cameras

Macro photography at the non-dslr camera level, currently, has one, single, glaring deficiency: lack of reasonable working distance between camera and subject (which for some very odd reason the reviewers never deal with at all). This is primarily due to the camera maker's choice to use the wide end of the zoom for the macro function which, in general, requires putting the camera lens within 1cm to 5cm from the subject in order to get a maximum subject /image ratio. This is great when you're photographing a ladybug on the end of a leaf in the great outdoors but it is an impossible distance when you're doing table top "studio" photography like the jewelry documentation and advertising photos I do weekly.

Such close focusing distances result in maximum distortion of the subject but minimum tolerance for lighting and reflection control. Earlier in the digital age Nikon made what I still consider to be the best non-dslr macro camera ever - the CoolPix 4500. It had a sweet spot in the middle of the zoom range that was distortion free while allowing fairly good working distances. For objects the size of rings, however, you could go even higher on the zoom range - getting a larger image while maintaining working distance - and the resulting distortion was negligible. It was (is) 4Mp which is twice the resolution evident in JohnDoe03's 2Mp fine shots. The downside was a strong tendency to burn the highlights requiring underexposure and then post processing to recover the proper brightness/contrast. Using the tif format was also a pain as it took a full 25" between shots.

The point is, however, that such working distances are possible from the camera design point of view but I know of no current compact, enthusiast, or near dslr digital camera that approaches this type of functionality. Hence I'm back to shooting all of my table top work with a Nikon DX camera fitted with a Nikkor 105 macro AF (which means manual focusing on a DX camera - but not necessarily a bad thing). Big for the setup I'm using but producing great results - and from a working distance I can live with.
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Old Jan 31, 2010, 12:16 PM   #7
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Goldwork-

Welcome to the Forum. We are delighted that you dropped by.

You use of a Nikon DSLR + a dedicated Nikon Macro Lens does indeed increase and assist macro or close-up results. It would be nice to see so of the images that you have produce with your equipment. I am sure that it is excellent. However, it also comes at a much higher price than the Sony H-20, priced at around $225.00.

Another issue that results in better working space, or stand off room, is the use of the "tele-macro" approach. It uses the camera's zoom capability to zero in on a small object.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jan 31, 2010, 1:04 PM   #8
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Sarah Joyce, thanks for the welcome. I'm a hit and miss poster but this thread caught my attention. I wasn't trying to brag about my equipment. Quite the opposite. In terms of resolution and image quality most of the major brand "consumer" cameras will produce photos every bit as good as the dslr rigs at the print sizes most commoly needed (1.5" X 1.5" newspaper ads to 8 X 10 glossies). These cameras, due to their diminished dimensions, are much more convenient to work with as well. I would prefer them over the dslr anytime. The fact that only the bottom ISO gives good results is no problem either as lighting can be adjusted to accomodate.

The problem, though, for myself and thousands and thousands of crafts people is the poor macro function in, now it seems all, consumer level and even so called enthusiast cameras described in my first post: working distance.

Regarding your reference to "tele-macro": all current zoom type digital cameras that I've investigated increase focusing distance as the focal length increases which has the effect of decreasing the image size on the sensor.

You can see examples of my work on my much neglected website at goldwork.com. The great majority of all posted images there were shot with the previously mentioned Nikon CoolPix 4500.

Les Brown
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Old Feb 2, 2010, 8:29 AM   #9
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Hi there, Goldwork-

Yes, in the past the Nikon brand of digicams were famed for their excellent macro capabilities. Today, only Samsung seems to have retained that high quality macro capability level. The Samsung TL-225 does excellent macros.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
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