Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > What Camera Should I Buy?

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Feb 22, 2010, 2:25 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
dropmyload's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Nairobi, Kenya
Posts: 392
Default Complete newbie...wants to graduate from p&s to dslr

Yes, here is another newbie who knows little but really wants to take better photos....

Currently using a Casio Exilim and a Nikon Coolpix L16 (and an Iphone 3GS haha) for taking pics of family, friends, holidays etc. I live in Africa so you can imagine the wildlife and scenery is amazing.

Now I want to get a decent entry-level slr to "learn" photography with.....and I would love to have a nice zoom lens with which I can take shots of wildlife, kids on safari, scenery, sunsets etc. Also dont want a very huge camera, something I can carry along to the bush, or to birthday parties, or even school plays.

I know I'm probably the millionth newbie here with the same questions, but can some expert pls kindly assist?

(I also dont want to spend the GDP of a third world country buying this entry level camera...)
dropmyload is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Feb 22, 2010, 2:43 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
pbjunkiee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Pensacola Fl
Posts: 914
Default

an entry level dslr kit is what you should look into.

either the canon rebel series

or the nikon 1000 series would be a good jumping off point.
pbjunkiee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 22, 2010, 2:57 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Alan T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Chester, UK
Posts: 2,980
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dropmyload View Post
... using a Casio Exilim and a Nikon Coolpix L16 (and an Iphone 3GS haha)...want to get a decent entry-level slr to "learn" photography with.....and I would love to have a nice zoom lens ....Also dont want a very huge camera, something I can carry along to the bush, or to birthday parties, or even school plays...dont want to spend the GDP of a third world country...entry level camera...)
The requirements "nice zoom lens", "slr", 'not "huge"', and 'go easily anywhere' are to some degree mutually exclusive. For the wildlife you'd really need a solid tripod as well.

Using a small 'bridge' superzoom hybrid camera (with plenty of manual overrides) as a first step would help with the 'learning' part, and be more likely to be taken everywhere. This would give you a more practical rather than theoretical idea of your dSLR requirements, and would do nicely as a backup later when you get the dSLR. Keep the Exilim or the Nikon as well, so it can always be in a shirt pocket when you haven't got the others.

Only you yourself can judge just how much you're willing to spend or to carry!

Good luck!
Alan T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 22, 2010, 3:11 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
dropmyload's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Nairobi, Kenya
Posts: 392
Default

Alan, any examples of such a superzoom camera?
dropmyload is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 22, 2010, 3:38 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Alan T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Chester, UK
Posts: 2,980
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dropmyload View Post
Alan, any examples of such a superzoom camera?
Best to look through the reviews on the main 'Steve's Digicams' site, and then in the relevant forums here.

I use two elderly (2-3 yrs!) Kodaks, a Z712 and Z1012, because they were very cheap and they're very small & light. But many folk think they're 'too plasticky'. I might well have a Canon or Panasonic model if I weren't so mean, but I'd be carrying a little more bulk and weight.

Each Kodak fits with ancillaries (including 2 spare batteries, cards, mini-tripod, cleaning materials) in a very small bag, roughly a 6-inch (150mm) cube. My film SLR bag (OM-10 & 3 lenses) used to be 12"x9"x11".

Happy photohunting!

Last edited by Alan T; Feb 22, 2010 at 3:40 AM.
Alan T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 22, 2010, 5:07 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,544
Default

While a superzoom P&S may do well, if you go with a dSLR, Olympus makes the smallest lightest models, and for equivalent angles of view, their lenses are smaller and lighter as well. But they're more prone to image noise at higher ISO settings than other dSLRs, and they don't focus as quickly for active kids and wildlife. The Canon T1i or XSi are probably better at that, along with the Pentax K-x, and aren't very big or very expensive.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 22, 2010, 10:39 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

dropmyload-

Welcome to the Forum. We're delighted you dropped by.

Reading the posts in this thread carefully, it would appear that an slr type camera, on that is generally refer to as a super zoom or a bridge camera is more of what you are looking for instead of a DSLR, per se. A good example of that type of camera is the Panasonic FZ-35/38, the Sony HX-1, and the Canon SX-20. Check those out, and then we can move forward in which ever direction you choose.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 22, 2010, 11:00 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
shoturtle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Frankfurt AM
Posts: 11,348
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dropmyload View Post
Yes, here is another newbie who knows little but really wants to take better photos....

Currently using a Casio Exilim and a Nikon Coolpix L16 (and an Iphone 3GS haha) for taking pics of family, friends, holidays etc. I live in Africa so you can imagine the wildlife and scenery is amazing.

Now I want to get a decent entry-level slr to "learn" photography with.....and I would love to have a nice zoom lens with which I can take shots of wildlife, kids on safari, scenery, sunsets etc. Also dont want a very huge camera, something I can carry along to the bush, or to birthday parties, or even school plays.

I know I'm probably the millionth newbie here with the same questions, but can some expert pls kindly assist?

(I also dont want to spend the GDP of a third world country buying this entry level camera...)
What is your budget.

For something not large, the olympus e620 is the smallest dslr on the market. It is a 4/3 sensor so if you can live with good iso performance to 800iso and acceptable at 1600iso. It is a good value with a ton of features. It also has the best lens kit on the market.

The pentax k-x is the best low light performance in the segment. There is only 2 camera currently in the entry level dslr segment that has 12800iso. It is the pentax k-x and canon T1i. The T1i is about 200 dollars more expensive.

If you a good mid grade entry level dslr the canon XSi is a great performer up to 1600iso which is it's highest level. It is a bit older the the T1i, but will have just as good imagine quality as the t1i covering the same iso range. The T1i is a bit higher end the the XSi, and has great low light ability. Also the canon's has the best auto focus in the entry level dslr market.

If you are not to concern about lens growth, the nikon d5000 is currently on rebates. It has the best flash system on the market if flash photography is a big thing for you. But you will be limited to lenses with built in motor AF to have it auto focus. So with the nikon lenses you can only use af-s and af-i series lenses.

All these camera take excellent photos, and the differences is up to what your eye prefers.

On a side note the pentax and olympus are the easiest to transition from point and shoot to dslr. They have more menu drive option and art filter for when you confuse about a shot set up.
__________________
Super Frequent Flyer, no joke. Ex Patriot and loving it.
Canon Eos 60D, T1i/500D, Eos1, Eos 630, Olympus EPL-1, and a part time Pentax K-X shooter.

Last edited by shoturtle; Feb 23, 2010 at 12:05 AM.
shoturtle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 22, 2010, 11:58 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
dropmyload's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Nairobi, Kenya
Posts: 392
Default

Thank you all so much.

So it is between a super hybrid and an entry level DSLR. I feel perhaps if the price diff isnt too big, a DSR would be a better buy, given the vesatility.

Let me check prices and let you guys know which model I'm feeling.

Once again, many many thanks!!
dropmyload is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 24, 2010, 5:13 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
dropmyload's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Nairobi, Kenya
Posts: 392
Default

Looks like Im leaning towards the Panasonic FZ35, it seems to have everything I want (except good quality in low light...which Im sure an extra flash can fix).

I was going through the web and found the below pic...what lens is that?

http://a.img-dpreview.com/news/0907/.../FZ38/lt55.jpg

Last edited by Mark1616; Feb 24, 2010 at 5:33 AM.
dropmyload is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 5:13 AM.