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Old Mar 13, 2010, 11:23 AM   #21
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calmmom-

Yes, certainly the Sony A-230, and the Canon XSi would give you much better image quality, better sports shots, better dof, and much better low light capability than the FZ-35.

Ielimated the Oly E-420 for lack of IS, and the Canon XS due to the fact that the XSi is clearly the better camera.The current low price of the Sony A-230, and the equally low price of the needed Sony 55-100mm lens, makes that a very attractive
alternative to the FZ-35, while giving you space to grow and stretch your legs photographically.

The Sony A-230 is, in my opinion, the easiest advanced camera on which to make your transition from P+S.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Mar 13, 2010, 11:31 AM   #22
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I agree with hards, if you are planning to do the occasional sport shot the canon option would be the better choice. As it does have the better Auto Focus system.

Also canon also gives you the largest selection of lenses in many price ranges.
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Old Mar 13, 2010, 11:48 AM   #23
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Ok, it looks like I may narrow it down to the Sony A230 or the Canon XSi. I know others have spoken highly about the Pentax K-X. Seeing that I will be doing some kids sports photos with just the kit lens (for now), which one of those 3 do you think would be the best for me? Remember, I am used to getting some decent sports shots with my old p+s now so that is what I am comparing to.

Now I need to start looking for deals.

You all are great! Thanks!
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Old Mar 13, 2010, 12:02 PM   #24
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calmmon-

My husband and I have raised 8 children. By and large those sports were outdoors. Even though I own and like both the Canon XSi and the Sony A-230. I think that due to the lower initial price of the A-230 and the economical availability of a Sony 55-200mm lens which you will need for those outdoor sports photos, that the Sony will be the better choice for you.

The Sony A-230 gets you in more inexpensively and with the two lenses that you will need for the sports photos. It will also be an easier camera on which to make your transition.

Have a great weekend.

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Old Mar 13, 2010, 12:18 PM   #25
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The higher iso of the k-x will let you take indoor shot much easier of your kids doing sports. It is the best low light camera in the entry level market, rivaling even the higher end canot T1i and T2i in noise at the higher iso's.

It is a much better camera then the A230, and it lets you do HD video if that is something you may be interested in. It too is a very easy camera for a point and shooter to move up to a dslr. It has a pretty easy to use menu system for scenes. Also has many art filters to let you do the creative shots.

If you were to get the k-x I would spend the extra 80-116 dollar for the 2 lens kit. The 55-200 is 80 dollar more, the 55-300mm is 116. If you get a longer general purpose telephoto zoom later, it will cost a lot more for the pentax lens, but will be in the 170 range for a aftermarket zoom.
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Old Mar 13, 2010, 1:42 PM   #26
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calmmom-

The Pentax Kx is not a bad choice, however, it does represent a measurably high initial investment on your part.

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Old Mar 13, 2010, 4:46 PM   #27
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Calmmom, I've not brought up any children, but I've shot thousands of sports photographs professionally LOL.

None of the wide kit lenses will give you the reach for sports just forget it. Depending on the sport you will likely find that 200mm is not long enough and need nearer 300mm to get good shots assuming the light is there. Now if you've been happy with the results from a P&S then you will get better results with a dSLR. Currently for sports the best AF system is in the Canon range (sports requires a good predictive continuous focus mode which is where Canon and Nikon take the lead).

The problem with this game as that budget and getting the best tool for the job don't always work together so you have to find the best balance for you. Personally I would be going Canon at the entry level and if you were in the mid to high level then Nikon currently has the edge. After this we then come to Sony and Pentax and I wouldn't like to make the call on which is better re the AF and lens options.

The other major element to getting good photos is having the right lens. IS isn't going to be of importance in sports but having a reasonably fast AF is. When I first started out with Sports photography for fun it was with a Tamron 70-300mm f4-5.6 which did OK but when moving up the food chain the results really improve, but again it is back to this cost issue.

Don't just buy something because it is the cheapest (or most expensive for that matter), make sure you get what is going to give you what you require now and what you are likely to want to do in the future. You don't want to be changing camera systems in the future, it really isn't a cheap thing to do, I know, I've done it once and not planning to do so again.
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Old Mar 14, 2010, 9:58 AM   #28
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As usual Mark has given some good advice. Of the posters in this thread, Mark is the only one who shoots sports - you would be wise to listen to what he has to say.
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Old Mar 14, 2010, 10:46 AM   #29
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I would really break down how much sport shooting you will be doing. As it can get very expensive on the lens department. If it is for the occasional snap. You may not want to make the heavy investment into a sport dedicated lens. You will also need to consider serious your budget, as it can get really expensive if you do want to shoot sports heavily.

But if you do want to go the sports route, Mark would be an excellent source of info.
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Old Mar 14, 2010, 11:20 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shoturtle View Post
I would really break down how much sport shooting you will be doing. As it can get very expensive on the lens department. If it is for the occasional snap. You may not want to make the heavy investment into a sport dedicated lens. You will also need to consider serious your budget, as it can get really expensive if you do want to shoot sports heavily.

But if you do want to go the sports route, Mark would be an excellent source of info.
The hard area is not knowing the future, so even if now it is just a snap, if wanting to add to the system later on it is better to have the right system in the first place.

As I mentioned it can get expensive, but even more so if you need to switch systems at a later date. The Sony will allow you to get some shots, just saying that there is an advantage to the Canon in this area.

I don't think it was mentioned what sports are required as again this can have an impact on the needs of the kit.

I've seen quite a few parents shooting their kids who get really involved with photography and as the kids go up the levels then the parents also go up the lens/body food chain to get better results.

So basically I'm saying, don't sell yourself short and have to change systems if that is likely to happen, get lenses that will do the job (when we know the system and the sports this can be discussed) and most importantly get out and enjoy your shooting.

I've not shoot too many youth outdoor sports but here is one to get you desiring your new camera even more.

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