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Old Mar 25, 2010, 3:35 AM   #1
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Default Which one to go with, Nikon D-5000 or Sony A 500

Hi Friends,

Please help me in deciding my DSLR camera, I am bit confused with the Image stabalisation which comes with Sony and Nikon Doesn't have.
will it make a big difference, or how can we judge on this.

One more thing I noticed while I was searching for Lens for Nikkon D 5000 that it comes with New Wide angle lens of 28-60mm and 60-180mm, should I go with this or with the normal one which comes with 18-55mm and 18-200mm lens?
Please advice.

Thanks & Regards
Vinoop

Last edited by Vinoop; Mar 25, 2010 at 3:36 AM. Reason: spelling mistakes
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Old Mar 25, 2010, 8:34 AM   #2
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Vinoop,

Nnot sure where 28-60 and 60-180mm lenses are coming from. The d5000 should be sold with 18-55 or sometimes 18-105. The 18-55 standard kit lens is stabilized. As is the popular consumer telezoom 55-200mm.

In general I think image stabilization is one of the most overrated features - just like more megapixels. It's important at longer focal lengths. There are some cases where it is beneficial at shorter focal lengths - if you are doing a lot of low light shooting OF NON-MOVING SUBJECTS. The key is non moving. Low light shooting of people or animals you shouldn't be relying on anti-shake to get good shots. It will let you down because people move - even slightly. But again, the kit lens of the nikon is stabilized as is a number of other nikon lenses which are priced competitively with sony lenses. The one drawback with the d5000 is it does not have a focus motor in the body. So you have to have a focus motor in the lens. Which means Nikon AF-S lenses or Sigma HSM lenses. That's fine for many zoom lenses. The problem is short prime lenses. Many don't have a focus motor. But, that's only an issue if you need those particular lenses.

But both are fine cameras.
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Old Mar 25, 2010, 10:00 AM   #3
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The Nikon D5000 and Sony A500 are both very good. Without knowing what you've got in mind. there isn't much that distinguishes them (except that the Nikon can record video while the Sony can't.)

I don't necessarily agree with JohnG about the usefulness of image stabilization. He uses flash a lot, where slow shutter speeds aren't an issue, and he shoots a lot of sports/action where faster shutter speeds are necessary, so image stabilization doesn't apply for what he does. I shoot in available light, and I shoot close-up, so image stabilization is more of a "must have" feature for me.

But as JohnG pointed out, whether you go with the Nikon D5000 or the Sony A500, you'll get image stabilization. The difference is philosophical.

But it would be easier for us to answer your broader question if we knew what you plan to take photos of.
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Old Mar 25, 2010, 10:38 AM   #4
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vinoop-

The Nikon D-5000 now has over 40 lenses that are available to it. It also has an articulated LCD screen which is desirable, and is is physically smaller and lighter than the Sony A500 making it an easier and faster camera to work with for long periods.

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Old Mar 25, 2010, 10:55 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
... It also has an articulated LCD screen ...
As does the A500, btw.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
... and is is physically smaller and lighter than the Sony A500 making it an easier and faster camera to work with for long periods.
The A500 body is bigger and heavier than the D5000, but Sony's typical consumer-grade lenses are smaller and lighter than Nikon's, so it evens out.
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Old Apr 6, 2010, 3:13 PM   #6
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HI All, thank you very much for your reply, and aplogize for the delay in replying as I was out of town for a week.
I am still confused, as most of the answers are supporting both. :-)
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Old Apr 6, 2010, 3:19 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vinoop View Post
I am still confused, as most of the answers are supporting both. :-)
Yeah. What's missing is what you want to do with which ever camera you choose. For instance, the Sony has image stabilization in the camera body, so any lens is stabilized, and thus stabilized lenses for the Sony will be smaller, lighter, and cheaper than for the Nikon. But if you won't be shooting in available light, or you won't be shooting close-ups, then it doesn't matter as much. But if you want the option to record video, then, of the two, the Nikon is the best (the only) choice.

So, what do you want to shoot?
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Old Apr 7, 2010, 6:05 PM   #8
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The sony also has 12800iso, so it is a bit better in low light. But it is a bigger camera.
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