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Old Apr 12, 2010, 8:29 PM   #1
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Default Native 1080P

Hey guys, what consumer camcorders on the market record in absolute native 1080P/24P?

So far I know that Panasonic has a few models that do, and the new Vixia cameras coming out soon do, but generally, the price tag is strictly $1000 for all of these, plus, Panasonic's models require the native setting to use a weird color saturation thing. Also, wikipedia says something about how the models that do indeed do this can or can't depending on wether the model is a 50hz model or a 60hz model?

Anyway, it'd be nice to really have a good list!
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Old Apr 13, 2010, 1:42 AM   #2
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You can check camcorderinfo.com but I'm pretty sure you've already answered your own question. Until the last year or two, this wasn't available at all on consumer camcorders so you're going to have to wait a bit if you want it to become available on low-end models.

p.s. Panasonic and "weird color" often go hand in hand. You can correct it in post-processing.
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Old Apr 14, 2010, 9:35 PM   #3
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I found out from Canon's website, and a review, that the Vixia HV40 http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/co...&modelid=17996 can record in native 24P, but I'm curious about it because it is only a 600$-700$ camera, and I've read that mini-dvd disks can't handle native progressive rates, although I may have misread. The camera also has a slot for a memory card, though, so that may be where it can output it to.

So far, I know the new Vixia's coming out April 15 can record in native, and the HV40 possibly records in native. For panasonic, there's the cameras I mentioned above...what about Sony, do they have any consumer based camcorders that do native?

And what about Sanyo and their whole 1080P deal? Do they output native as well, or is it still the 60i transformation that alot of the cameras have?

Last edited by CSmitty123; Apr 15, 2010 at 9:50 AM.
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Old Apr 15, 2010, 7:21 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CSmitty123 View Post
I found out from Canon's website, and a review, that the Vixia HV40 http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/co...&modelid=17996 can record in native 24P, but I'm curious about it because it is only a 600$-700$ camera, and I've read that mini-dvd disks can't handle native progressive rates, although I may have misread. The camera also has a slot for a memory card, though, so that may be where it can output it to.

So far, I know the new Vixia's coming out April 15 can record in native, and the HV40 possibly records in native. For panasonic, there's the cameras I mentioned above...what about Sony, do they have any consumer based camcorders that do native?

And what about Sanyo and their whole 1080P deal? Do they output native as well, or is it still the 60i transformation that alot of the cameras have?
The HV40 does native 24p but not native 30p. Personally though, I think tape is a huge step backwards at this point. AVCHD supports 24mbps widely now and I don't see any benefit to tape aside form the lower cost. I believe Sanyo's best cam last year had native 24p. Sony is going to give you lower video quality than the other 3 brands we are discussing and certainly less accurate colors than at least the Canon and Panasonic cams. I do not believe Sony is offering native 24p anyway.
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Old Apr 19, 2010, 7:38 PM   #5
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So I recently found the Canon HF S100 camcorder for 400$ on a website that also offers free warranty for a year, and offers a free tripod, free case, and free video light. The problem is, the reason for this mega-sale is because the S100 is becoming completely obsolete; the S200 can do every single thing the S100 can plus new and extremely revolutionary features: better low light, native 24P, dual memory cards, ect ect and for only a couple hundred dollars more than what the HF100 was originally priced (Hf100 = $700 on amazon.)

But here's where my problem is, I'm shooting a film that's going to be shown in film festivals and probably select theaters, and while it isn't a high action movie, I don't want it to look pixelated or weird on a big screen. I want to use a small, handheld camera for this film so that I can surround myself with a natural production style for myself and for my actors. If I knew that the S100's "wrapper" (the way it requiredly converts 24P to two interlaced equaling 60P) would end up not hurting me in any way for my indie film, then I'd snatch up this 400$ amazing deal! (Even amazon still has the S100 for 700$).

But if Native 24P is truly what I need and no exceptions, I would spend $1,000 on the brand new S200, but it would extremely, extremely effect my budget. I just wish I knew exactly what was the right choice for me, and I sort of wish someone would tell me in confidence that it'd be impossible to notice any sort of loss of info once the S100 did it's thing, even on a very large screen, or if there's any other problems I could encounter, but I just really don't know.

Also, I've heard that despite the S100's Wrapper requirement, that you can connect it to a computer and save the files directly to the computer while filming to bypass the 60i wrapper. Is this true?
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Old Apr 20, 2010, 3:04 AM   #6
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You should really check out some HD videos on Vimeo with the various cams if you are concerned. I am very, very picky and my Panasonic HDC-HS250 video looks fantastic on my 50" 1080p plasma. I primarily shoot in 60i but I have used the 24p mode at times as well for that cinematic motion effect. Granted I have not watched my home movies in a theatre ...

I have never even heard of anyone trying to connect a consumer cam to a PC for recording so I can't comment on that. However, I don't see what the PC would have to do with the recording behavior.

Remember that none of these cams are going to provide indoor video that is commercially usable without some serious upgrades to the indoor lighting.

If you buy from Amazon and the cam doesn't suit your needs, you can return it within 30 days (or more in some cases) and only lose the shipping cost (about $8). B&H has a similar policy though the timeframe is 15 days.
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