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Old Apr 13, 2010, 8:06 AM   #11
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Same as on my Canons, you never get the HDMI cable and I've never bough one either. Just put them on the PC and watch videos there.
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Old Apr 13, 2010, 8:15 AM   #12
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Yep... manufacturers seem to be "pinching pennies" in a lot of areas now to save money (which makes sense, as competitive as the digital camera market is). You see the same thing in other areas, too (more and more kit lenses don't come with hoods so you have to buy them, remote controls are optional for cameras that have that ability, etc.). When I got my Sony A700, they were still including things like hoods for kit lenses, a nice IR remote control and more. With some of the newer models, those types of extras are starting to become optional.
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Old Apr 13, 2010, 10:42 PM   #13
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let's say money is not a problem... i might take photography as a minor so i def. need a dslr instead of point and shoot.

I heard most people recommend me to buy a beginner dslr but the thing is i want to learn how to use more manual controlled dslr that i can use for my entire minor classes.

that being said i don't want to buy a beginner dslr right now then have to buy another more advanced setting dslr latter in my college year.

any suggestion on what type of dslr is easy to use for beginners but also have more advance settings would be great.

and is this a good idea or should i really learn how to use a beginner dslr before going for a more advance one?
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Old Apr 13, 2010, 10:49 PM   #14
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I would not under estimate the high end entry level dslr. They are really good, and packed with features and performance especially the pentax k-x, canon t1i and canon T2i. They have features you would find in then next tier of dslr the prosumer level. They really blur the line between the two grades of camera.

Save the money invest in glass if you are serious about getting into photography. Canon T1i is a great option if you do not need all the HD features of the T2i, and will give you access to the most lens option on the market. Canon have a clear lens progression path from affordable to mid range to high end. The pentax does not have a many lenses. But both camera packs tons of performance.
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Old Apr 14, 2010, 4:40 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boboo View Post
let's say money is not a problem... i might take photography as a minor so i def. need a dslr instead of point and shoot.

I heard most people recommend me to buy a beginner dslr but the thing is i want to learn how to use more manual controlled dslr that i can use for my entire minor classes.

that being said i don't want to buy a beginner dslr right now then have to buy another more advanced setting dslr latter in my college year.

any suggestion on what type of dslr is easy to use for beginners but also have more advance settings would be great.

and is this a good idea or should i really learn how to use a beginner dslr before going for a more advance one?
The main things which spring to mind that generally set a higher level dSLR apart from a more entry level one are build quality, control button layout (things are generally less hidden in menus for higher end cameras), reduced auto modes (high end cameras don't have preset scene modes so you have to know what you want, larger viewfinders (big bonus), larger size (helpful depending on the size of your hands), often faster continuous shooting (not always a benefit unless shooting wildlife or sports), better AF systems..... hmmm, that's the majority of things I can think off, will add others if I think of any.

So, even with an entry level dSLR you can shoot in one of the partial auto modes such as aperture priority or shutter priority as well as full manual where you take full control of the camera. These are no different to shooting with a high end camera so for learning you can do the same right through the range. Where you really get better quality and creative control is with using the right glass.

As already mentioned the Canon range has a huge selection of lenses available, all of which will work on the various models in the entry to mid range. With Pentax, although they don't have so many new lens options there are a good number of 2nd hand manual or auto focus ones in the market. The downside of the K-x is that you don't have a visual confirmation of the auto focus point that is being used which is a pain and a lot of users are not keen on this. With Nikon, there is, like Canon a good number of lenses available but some of the prime lenses that might be needed for a course (prime means fixed focal length rather than zoom) will not auto focus with bodies until you get to the D90. Sony, good new glass, not too many option but there are some great quality ones there (and some high price ones), you can also use the old minolta AF lenses to increase options.

In honesty, I would potentially look at going Canon (not because I shoot it.... I'm more than happy to suggest other brands if they fit), reason being is you have the lens options and there is a very good chance that others will be shooting Canon meaning you can borrow other lenses, flash with people on your course to play around etc. Do you need to go as far as the T1i or T2i, I doubt it very much, yes they are nice but for learning they are potentially over kill (depending on budget), also you want to find out what else is needed for the course prior to purchasing, such as flash, lenses, tripod etc etc.
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Old Apr 14, 2010, 5:33 AM   #16
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Ah, thanks Jim. I wasn't sure as I knew the sensors were still the normal aspect ratio so wondered what the significance was. For most people printing then these won't make a difference but could be nice for people who only shoot landscape and want to view on the TV/monitor only.
I won't make up a number but it would be interesting to poll new-comers to dslr on how they plan to view their pics. Print or tv/monitor. There is no drawback at this point to having your camera do 3:2 and 16:9 (except naturally limited manufacturer choice). In the future, perhaps manufacturers will offer newly designed sensors cut in specific form factors and we'll have another item to choose by.

Personally, I really want 16:9. Print is so low down on my list of priorities that it doesn't matter. I can surely crop for the few prints I'll make. On the other hand, I'm not going to crop every photo to fit my chosen display medium.

I mention this because it seems to be a point glossed over my the pro reviews.
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Old Apr 14, 2010, 6:08 AM   #17
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It is an interesting point that I've never considered as a lot of my work is for print and also to get the wider more traditional angles out of lenses, however I can see that there could be more use for this ratio. My Canon SX1 has the option and if I've been shooting video with it sometimes I will forget and take some shots in 16:9 which are OK in landscape but a waste (generally) in portrait.

I've created a poll to try to gather some feedback on this question. http://forums.steves-digicams.com/ge...ur-photos.html
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