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Old May 12, 2010, 6:04 PM   #11
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Hank-

In a DSLR camera a swivel LCD is nice. In a super zoom I don't feel it is as important. If indoor lighting is an issue for you, the FZ-35 is a nice fit.

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Old May 13, 2010, 4:33 AM   #12
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Potential buyers reading this thread may want to try the video modes on both cameras before they decide. Currently I'm quite irritated and disappointed with the FZ35's video. When there is a point source in the picture (e.g. a spotlight, or sunlight reflecting off a car driving by), almost invariably this results in purple and white vertical streaking. Apparently this problem is known, and there is nothing to be done - the artefacts are courtesy of CCD sensor technology.

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Mark
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Old May 13, 2010, 7:51 AM   #13
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That, Mark, unfortunately is a very poor analysis of a known problem. It only occurs when shooting directly into a powerful light source or the sun. it is not unique to the FZ35/38, it also happens in other cameras. It is called lens flare.

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Old May 13, 2010, 8:13 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
That, Mark, unfortunately is a very poor analysis of a known problem. It only occurs when shooting directly into a powerful light source or the sun. it is not unique to the FZ35/38, it also happens in other cameras. It is called lens flare.

Sarah Joyce
Actually this is a poor analysis, as it is due to the CCD sensors handling of bright light sources when shooting video. The SX20 does seem to handle this better than the Panasonic, but as it is still CCD technology it is there. CMOS sensors do not have this issue, however they have other problems such as rolling shutter. Use a long lens hood to protect the camera and don't shoot at bright light sources and then it's not a problem for either camera, go with the Canon as it is bit more controlled if this is the final deciding factor, but still you will find the issue there, or lastly go CMOS but run into other areas of difficulty.
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Old May 13, 2010, 8:13 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
Hank-

In a DSLR camera a swivel LCD is nice. In a super zoom I don't feel it is as important. If indoor lighting is an issue for you, the FZ-35 is a nice fit.

Sarah Joyce
It is really nice if you are using it to video....i regularly use mine on my s5is
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Old May 13, 2010, 10:17 AM   #16
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Thanks for the back-up there, MarkSixteenSixteen. CCD highlight streaking has nothing to do with lens flare, Sarah Joyce. In fact, while doing a quick search for this phenomenon, I came across a thread, only four months old, on this forum, in which you actually took part:
http://forums.steves-digicams.com/pa...ple-lines.html

The phenomenon was explained already there, both by Mark and by Hards, you were even shown stills from videos, and someone posted a link to a sample video!
http://www.vimeo.com/7091455

dpreview also had a whole thread on this:
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/re...ssage=33114322

You wrote in that first thread that you never use video. Well, fine, but that doesn't mean that the problem doesn't exist. Pray tell, whose analysis is poor?

I remember reading that people have actually returned cameras because of this - it may have been on cameralabs.com or perhaps a customer review at amazon.com - the stills captured from some of those videos were completely marred by purple and green vertical streaking.

I shot an in-car video the other day, while driving home from work just after sunset. It was completely useless, because each street light, each car headlight made a vertical streak.

Granted, it's not a train-smash - it's just an irritation that I wanted to mention here. All CCD sensors suffer from it, but apparently the FZ35 is particularly bad.

For my part, I'll be on the lookout for a ND-filter; apparently, it helps to alleviate the CCD streaking.

P.S.: in this video, you can actually see that lens flare and CCD streaking are quite distinct from one another:
http://www.vimeo.com/6606024
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Old May 13, 2010, 9:04 PM   #17
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Well thanks, to both Mark's-

Good to get added details and become more versed in how these two problems are entirely different. How do camcorders avoid this problem?

Sarah joyce
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Old May 14, 2010, 6:18 AM   #18
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Hi Sarah Joyce,

I haven't read into great detail, but from what I've been able to understand, the problem has to do with transferring charge across a whole row of detectors, to the side of the CCD sensor. In a digital camera, the sensor is primarily designed for stills, and in video mode, it is effectively "pushed" into a high-speed burst mode. The fast charge transfer becomes problematic when pixels are close to saturation. It seems that even camcorders with CCD sensors exhibit this problem to some degree. (It's actually one way to distinguish between film and video.) But the problem is not nearly so pronounced on camcorders - perhaps they have sensors that...
* are larger?
* don't saturate so easily?
* transfer charge more quickly?

Regards,
Mark
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Old May 14, 2010, 9:29 AM   #19
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Quote:
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Well thanks, to both Mark's-

Good to get added details and become more versed in how these two problems are entirely different. How do camcorders avoid this problem?

Sarah joyce
Most of them are CMOS aren't they Sarah? I.E. the Sanyo 1010HD we use is a CMOS Sensor...
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Old May 14, 2010, 9:53 AM   #20
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LTZ-

Reading from yesterday, Cmos imagers have their own problem called "rolling shutter."

Sarah Joyce
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