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Old May 17, 2010, 8:11 AM   #21
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No problem, Bif dropped

Ergo is a bit more important the any of the factors. If you can not navigate the camera easily. Then the camera will not perform correctly for you.

All the other add on features are nice, but if you do not use them. Then they are fluff. The HDR, HD video and double exposure ability of the pentax is nice, but never see uses. So if it is a feature you do not use, I would not factor that into the decision.

The external flash is nice. But if you are trying to stay compact, it just adds bulk to the kit.
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Old May 17, 2010, 9:55 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by shoturtle View Post
Ergo is a bit more important the any of the factors. If you can not navigate the camera easily. Then the camera will not perform correctly for you.
Exactly what would you find hard to navigate using a D5000? Sure, he should see if the Pentax grip fits better. Personally, I doubt it for most hand sizes, since the Nikon has a bit larger grip surface with about the same weight as the Pentax.

For commonly used settings with the K-x (drive mode, WB, focus mode, iso speed, metering mode, HDR options, etc.), you can press the Info button, use the 4 way controller to navigate to what you want to change, and easily change it.

For commonly used settings with the D5000 (drive mode, WB, focus mode, ISO speed, metering mode, d-lighting options, etc.), you can press the Info button, use the 4 way controller to navigate to what you want to change, and easily change it.

Most newer dSLR models work in a similar manner (press one key to get to a screen that has the most commonly changed settings, letting you use the multi-direction controller to select the one you want to change). ;-)

Both models have a dedicated +- button for EV compensation and a single control wheel for changing aperture or shutter speed in other modes, which is one thing you may need to do more often. Both models also have a dedicated button that can be used for AE or AF lock. Both models have a dedicated LV button if that's something you want to use.

Both models have a similar mode dial (with commonly used PASM settings, as well as a variety of scene mode selections).

For less commonly used features, you may have to navigate menus. No big deal for things you don't change very often (custom settings, etc.). ;-)

I just don't see where the Pentax would have any ease of use advantages over the D5000 (which seems to be the OP's primary concern).

But, the D5000 would offer better focus in dimmer lighting (anything below EV 6 from tests I've seen using a 50mm f/1.4 to test with), and with a dimmer lens, the Nikon would start having the advantage in lighting better than that. The Nikon also has a body based AF assist lamp to help out in that area if lighting is very dim (since the use of a Flash for AF assist can be rather irritating).

Both models use a Sony 12MP CMOS Sensor, with the main difference between them likely being a different AA filter (probably weaker with the Pentax since tests show slightly more moiré from it when approaching extinction resolution) and a slightly different approach to noise reduction and tone curves (with the Pentax images looking slightly desaturated at it's highest ISO speed settings compared to images from the Nikon, with the Pentax retaining slightly more detail, as it's default NR is slighly less aggressive).

There are pros and cons to both approaches to NR (and both have user tunable settings in camera anyway). The Nikon also has better Dynamic Range shooting JPEG from tests I've seen.

Shooting RAW, these models test virtually identical, as you'd expect, since they both use a similar Sony 12MP CMOS Sensor. Both models appear to be modifying raw files to some extent from evidence I've seen (which can skew test results some). But, there's really not much difference between them shooting RAW:

DxOMark comparison from these two camera's raw files

IOW, unless you're viewing images at 100% viewing size, I doubt you'd see any appreciable difference between them for practical use in most areas, after tuning camera settings to taste (NR settings, contrast, sharpness, saturation, etc.).

IOW, we're just splitting hairs, as things like metering accuracy, WB accuracy and more are likely to have more impact on your images in real world conditions, versus shooting test charts anyway (and I doubt the Pentax is gong to be any better in those areas).

Given that the OP already has a D5000, I just don't see where it would make sense to return it for another camera, unless there is something the OP doesn't like about it (and I'd make sure the same issues don't exist on another model). I've seen more than one user regret changing systems in the past, because they thought another camera would be better, when that didn't turn out to be the case. Any of them have pros and cons, and any camera can take some time to get used to.

The D5000 is a pretty good camera for it's class, and I think we're just confusing the OP by bringing up other options, suggesting that they may be easier to use or offer some appreciable benefit. Everyone is welcome to express their opinion about it. But, personally, I just don't see it that way, as they're far too similar in too many areas.
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Old May 17, 2010, 2:41 PM   #23
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Thanks to everyone who has posted a response and thank you shoturtle for posting your photos.

When comparing, the one thing that I like about Nikon is that there is a 2 year warrenty as opposed to 1 year on the other brands.

I have another question about the D5000 - I have taken about 100 shots using a Duracell 8GB memory card. Suddenly today, I received a message saying :"Cannot format memory card. Card may be defective. Please insert another card". I have looked online to find a few other D5000 owners have had the same problem - and the result was they lost all of the photos that were stored on the memory card. Is it simply because one needs to stick to the cards listed in the manual as approved? Has anyone else experienced this? It's interesting that the camera formatted and used the memory card just fine until today. THere is nothing worse than losing your photos - I would return the camera if this is a Nikon D5000 issue.

Thanks..
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Old May 17, 2010, 3:08 PM   #24
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Duracell, huh?

I didn't even know you could get Duracell branded Memory Cards. :-)

See if you can get your photos back as a first step.

I'd download Photorec (free). It's available for multiple platforms (Windows, DOS, Linux, OS X, etc.). It's the one I usually use for image recovery.

http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/PhotoRec

Just download the program (see the download link on the left side of the page), unzip it, navigate to the win folder underneath where you unzipped it to and click on the photorec_win program to start it if you're using Windows. The .zip file also contains testdisk (another utility). But, you want to use Photorec instead.

Then, just pick your memory card from the list that comes up (you should be able to tell which one it is from it's size), and use the defaults for everything else. Note that sometimes it's best to use the "Whole Disk" option on the partition selection screen (but, in most cases, the defaults work fine)

IOW, in most cases, the only screen you'll need to do anything but press enter on is the one asking you where to save files. Press Y for that one if you want to use the default folder locations (under where you started the program from on your hard drive). By default it will create folders named recup_dir.1, recup_dir.2, etc. underneath the win folder you started the program from and place recovered images there.

Download link for the windows version:

http://www.cgsecurity.org/testdisk-6.11.3.win.zip

If you're using OS X, Linux, etc., just go to the download link menu choice on the left side of the main page and get the appropriate download for the operating system you're using.

Another free program you can use under Windows is diskdiggger if you're uncomfortable with the text based interface photorec uses.

http://dmitrybrant.com/diskdigger

Here's the direct download link to it.

http://dmitrybrant.com/files/diskdigger.zip

Just unzip it and run the program. For deleted files, just use the defaults for everything (don't try to uncheck any boxes).

If it doesn't find your files (i.e., you've formatted the card and their is no File Allocation it can use), just restart it and select the "Scan the disk surface for traces of lost files (dig deeper)" option and it will work the same was as photorec (ignoring the file system entirely, which is useful for badly damaged media with file system errors). Click on the Save column over the images it finds and it will prompt you where you want to save them to on your hard drive.

But, diskdigger doesn't work as well as photorec for badly damaged media with some file types (i.e., it has trouble determining how many bytes to recover unless you tell it using the box that pops up with some raw files).

Here's yet another free program. But, note that it does not work with Vista or Win 7 (it's best used with XP):

http://www.pcinspector.de/SmartRecov...htm?language=1

After you get your photos back, then see if your card will format using windows disk management (and if you see any partitions on it, delete them). Format it as FAT32, then make sure to "right click" on the card under My Computer and "eject" it before removing it from your card reader to make sure any writes cached in memory are written to it with the card unmounted properly), and then see if the camera will format it using the camera's menu choice for format.

Then, buy another memory card. I'd probably go with something like this one (16GB Transcend Class 10 for $46.99 delivered). IMO, it's probably your best "bang for the buck" (very good balance between storage capacity and speed for the money for use in that type of camera).

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16820208535

Or, in a more expensive card that tests even faster (although I doubt you'd see enough difference to warrant the extra cost), go with something like a Sandisk 30MB/Second Class 10 Extreme III SDHC card instead (and not all Extreme III cards are 30MB/Second, so get one marked that way).
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Old May 17, 2010, 3:48 PM   #25
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If you are going to keep the d5000, check if it is one of the ones that are on the recall list. I forgot exactly what it was recall for, some power issue. But I would check anyways. Think you can check with the SN number on the Nikon website.

PS

It really should not matter what brand of card you use, as sdhc is a standard. That said, some cards are more reliable then other. I have seen and know people that have duracell cards. Bestbuy sells them. And they seem to be good and reliable cards for their point and shoot cameras. Have not tried it on a dslr. But that should not really matter. It may be you just have a bumb card. I have had scandisk card go bad at work. So fluke things can happen.

But I would avoid ADATA cards.
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Last edited by shoturtle; May 18, 2010 at 10:51 PM.
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Old May 17, 2010, 6:19 PM   #26
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Thanks for the tips. My card appears to be dead - will not read at all.

The interesting thing is that I have come across 2 other individuals online who have had the same problem - one person had 3 memory cards get ruined in the D5000 - 2 of which were not on the approved list, one of which was on the approved list. This individual lost many more photos than myself.

This is a new memory card -there is no good reason that it should have just died.

I may return the camera - sadly because I was beginning to get used to it and I may check out the K-x. I was excited about the extra quiet mode on the D5000.

Oh well, we'll see but I'm very glad this memory card issue happened while I am still able to return the camera.
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Old May 17, 2010, 6:22 PM   #27
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Sorry to hear about the lost photo, but if you want to remain with a nikon. The d90 is a excellent camera. But quite a bit more.
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Old May 22, 2010, 5:59 PM   #28
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Quote:
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This is a new memory card -there is no good reason that it should have just died.
Make sure you buy only factory packaged name brand cards from a reliable domestic seller. If you buy cheap "bulk" or "OEM" cards (even supposed name brand ones) from overseas on line sellers, there is a good chance they will be counterfeits of inferior quality.
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Old May 25, 2010, 6:16 PM   #29
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CMM/Carolyn-

Both the Nikon D-5000 and the Pentax Kx are very good DSLR cameras. In fact, I own both of them. If high ISO capability is an issue for you, the Pentax Kx has the best ISO capability.

Are you interested in just the camera and kit lens, or a 2 lens kit? How do you feel about buying on E-Bay? Cameta Cameras has a D-5000 body closing this afternoon (05/25) for around $450.00 with a full 1 year guarantee. That is where I found the lowest price on the D-5000. The Pentax Kx runs right around $500 for the camera and kit lens. Pentax has 2 two lens kit, the Pentax 18-55mm and the Pentax 50-200mm or the Pentax 18-55mm and the Pentax 55-300mm lens. The last 2 lens kit with the 55-300mm lens is $679 at B&H.

So, all in all the Pentax KX will cost a little bit less, and has the best high ISO capability, but it flash system is behind Nikon's flash system. You often here the remark that the Nikon D-5000 does not have the ability to use the entire line of lenses, and that is true, but it does not mean much. There are over 40 different lens available for the Nikon D-5000.

Both camera's menus system are good, though I like Nikon's a little better. The new lens selection for Pentax is limited when compared to Nikon's or Canon's. So, it comes down to personal preferences. You cannot go wrong with either camera really.

So, now it is your turn, Carolyn, give us some feedback with your D-5000 experience??

Sarah Joyce
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