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Old May 17, 2010, 6:57 PM   #11
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The pentax in nice, but you loose the option of the tokina 11-16mm 2.8. Both the pentax and the canon will do a nice job. The difference in angle of view between the 1.5 and 1.6 crop bodies are not that dramatic, at 10mm you are looking at a 35mm eq of 15 with the pentax, and 16mm with the canon. The 1mm may or may not make the difference with say a sigma 10-20mm or the new sigma 8-16mm.
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Old May 17, 2010, 7:00 PM   #12
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Following up on your reply to my thread...

While I shoot the Nikon D90, the Canon T2i is a very good choice. It typically competes directly with it and priced slightly above the D90 but that sale they have going on is great. The only problem is, the three sites I checked were all 'backordered' and it appears the sale ends 6/6...so can they deliver? The reason I was checking was the question about the Mack warranty coupled with the low price suggested gray market, but appears legit for Canon USA product and Canon USA warranty. If it was a gray market unit would absolutely say getting the Mack warranty, but even though Canon's warranty isn't 3 years, most prooblems with electronics happen in the first year. You would probably be better served using that money, and a little more, and getting a Canon flash, as the oncamera flash is very limited.

Telephoto - rare that would use it in real estate photography, but potentially useful for other personal photography. At that price get it. About the only time would be lakefront or lake view property where you want to bring the lake in closer without the distracting intermediate landscape.

On the SD card, economize as others suggested. I only have an 8mb Toshiba (Class 4) which I caught on sale at OfficeMax for $15. Granted not as fast as the Transend Class 10 mentioned earlier, but never had problems. Also, capacity not critical as you will not leave on the camera that long - and it looks like with my camera set to RAW, I have 500+ shots available.

Image stabalization is not that critical. Use a tripod. PERIOD!

While the photos you saw on the other thread were all available light, when using flash, on camera is OK, but off camera and multi flash is far superior. Don't know what the wireless flash capability of the Canon is.

The room coverage will be about the same as your SD880 which goes down to 28mm (equiv) but of course, the depth and detail plus low light handling will be far superior. You probably noticed the lens coverage difference when you progress from the 35/38mm coverage of the SD850/A80. Yes, the ultrawide angle opens a whole new world, but would defer that until you get to know the camera (and a closing or two). Canon's 10-22 is excellent (and probably better than Nikon's 10-24) but I am perfectly happy with Sigma's 10-20 f4-5.6 (not the newer constant aperature f3.5) and roughly half the price of Canon/Nikon. Some will suggest the Tokina 11-16 f2.8 which is an excellent lens, I ruled it out due to the range and am glad I did. I get Virtual Tours for free (Prudential has a corporate arrangement) and found that stitching ultrawide frames is problematic and usually shoot them around 18-20mm. With the Tokina, I would have to switch lens.

The other reason I suggested holding off the ultrawide purchase until after learning the camera, is that it is a very difficult lens to master. You really have to pay attention to the angles. Forget corner to corner. Typically, center of the room and at times squatting to waist level evens everything out. Exterior - and "L" shaped house is another challenge as the forward part really juts towards you. Also, If you don't have post processing software, watch the sales for Paint Shop Pro x3 (got mine for Best Buy for $49) or Adobe Photoshop Elements (sales around $65) - avoid the $99 retail. They (I belive Adobe's does) have the ability to adjust the perspective angles - vertically and horizonally - that you couldn't avoid when taking the picture. I probably will upgrade to Photoshop CS5 soon, but that is a whole different issue.

FREE PROGRAM! I just downloaded "Handbrake" which is freeware. Movies are HUGE and this will downsize movies (while retaining the original) for web and ipod. I am in Toastmasters and typically we used a Flip to video 5-7 min speeches and email to them to review their speech. That person was out so I filmed a 7 min speech - not in HD, on my D90 and couldn't email it as it (far) exceeded the 25mb limit. Burnt it to disc and it took 2/3 of the CD! Appears to be a very useful program - but still didn't get it to email size.

Above is 2 of the three things I discuss in a seminar I give to Realtors - cameras and software. The last I call "You". What is the story you want to tell about that property. Photography is the medium - tell the story. It is also where we look at trashy MLS photos and ask what was their story.

Good luck.

Last edited by tizeye; May 17, 2010 at 7:17 PM.
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Old May 17, 2010, 7:06 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shoturtle View Post
The pentax in nice, but you loose the option of the tokina 11-16mm 2.8. Both the pentax and the canon will do a nice job. The difference in angle of view between the 1.5 and 1.6 crop bodies are not that dramatic, at 10mm you are looking at a 35mm eq of 15 with the pentax, and 16mm with the canon. The 1mm may or may not make the difference with say a sigma 10-20mm or the new sigma 8-16mm.
That works out to be about a 5 difference when using the same lens. That's the difference between a 90 angle of view and 85. The wider you go, the bigger the difference.
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Old May 17, 2010, 7:09 PM   #14
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I will defer to tizeye on this matter, he is the expert in real estate photography.
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Old May 17, 2010, 7:34 PM   #15
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I will defer to tizeye on this matter, he is the expert in real estate photography.


I am glad the 8-16 wasn't available when I was shopping for the ultrawide or I would have been sorely tempted. I went through the 10 vs 12 on the short end, and the shots I took inside the camera store with a constant left marker had notable coverage differences. I would have gotten the 8-16 out of ignorance and been very frustrated.

The 8-16 is probably great for true landscape - like the Grand Canyons. But throw in corners, angles, walls and trying to control perspective I'm getting nighmares. With the 10, it has been a significant learning experience. Trust me, you don't want to see some of my flops.
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Old May 17, 2010, 7:38 PM   #16
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We all have flops, when I first started out with low light shooting many many years back. There were some awful ones, but we all learn
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Old May 17, 2010, 9:47 PM   #17
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Thanks a lot for the reply tizeye, definitely looked into the D90, and would wait for the D90s (whatever it'll be called), if I knew when it was coming, but I know the T2i is here for the busy season. Same goes for waiting for the Canon 60D.

Quote:
The only problem is, the three sites I checked were all 'backordered' and it appears the sale ends 6/6...so can they deliver?The reason I was checking was the question about the Mack warranty coupled with the low price suggested gray market, but appears legit for Canon USA product and Canon USA warranty.
Local store, 2 left in stock, likely heading there in the morning, since no one has voiced serious drawbacks to the T2i in this thread, or the MANY reviews I've read. Obviously I'll check replies before I go. Price is about $70 lower than I've seen elsewhere, which surprised me too, but I verified that it's not import.

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Telephoto - rare that would use it in real estate photography, but potentially useful for other personal photography. At that price get it. About the only time would be lakefront or lake view property where you want to bring the lake in closer without the distracting intermediate landscape.
Don't do a ton of lakefront, so the telephoto would primarily be for personal use.

Quote:
Image stabalization is not that critical. Use a tripod. PERIOD!
Always use a tripod for real estate, but IS will be crucial chasing my 3.5 year old.

Quote:
While the photos you saw on the other thread were all available light, when using flash, on camera is OK, but off camera and multi flash is far superior. Don't know what the wireless flash capability of the Canon is.
Good call on the additional flash, will definitely look into it.

Quote:
The room coverage will be about the same as your SD880 which goes down to 28mm (equiv) but of course, the depth and detail plus low light handling will be far superior.
28mm is exactly why I went with the SD880, which is why the kit lens will suffice temporarily.

Quote:
Yes, the ultrawide angle opens a whole new world, but would defer that until you get to know the camera (and a closing or two). Canon's 10-22 is excellent (and probably better than Nikon's 10-24) but I am perfectly happy with Sigma's 10-20 f4-5.6 (not the newer constant aperature f3.5) and roughly half the price of Canon/Nikon. Some will suggest the Tokina 11-16 f2.8 which is an excellent lens, I ruled it out due to the range and am glad I did.
Interesting info from everyone about the lens choices, all of which I've been researching. I guess I'm hesitant to go with something other than Canon, due to some reviews I've read where Sigma/Tokina users have said, "spend the extra money on the Canon". On the flip side, only a couple Canon users have said, "save the money and go with the...". I'm big on paying for quality.

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I get Virtual Tours for free (Prudential has a corporate arrangement) and found that stitching ultrawide frames is problematic and usually shoot them around 18-20mm.
Pardon? Your brokerage, or PREA? Been with Prudential for 7 years, but didn't know about a corporate agreement. I've been paying for my own for the past 4 years.

Quote:
The other reason I suggested holding off the ultrawide purchase until after learning the camera, is that it is a very difficult lens to master.
I'm a quick learner, which will hopefully apply in this situation of switching to SLR.

Quote:
Also, If you don't have post processing software, watch the sales for Paint Shop Pro x3 (got mine for Best Buy for $49) or Adobe Photoshop Elements
Photoshop user for the past decade or so.

Quote:
FREE PROGRAM! I just downloaded "Handbrake" which is freeware. Movies are HUGE and this will downsize movies (while retaining the original) for web and ipod.
Already use handbrake for other stuff, but also have Adobe Premiere Elements in the arsenal.

Quote:
Above is 2 of the three things I discuss in a seminar I give to Realtors - cameras and software. The last I call "You". What is the story you want to tell about that property. Photography is the medium - tell the story. It is also where we look at trashy MLS photos and ask what was their story.
Awesome info, and I see AWFUL MLS photos everyday. Mine are good now, looking for them to be great.

Thanks again for the info, and keep it comin'!

Last edited by ckeegan; May 17, 2010 at 9:54 PM.
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Old May 17, 2010, 9:52 PM   #18
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The T2i is a very good cameras, the little difference that Tcav and I debated about will not make much of a difference base on what tizeye have inform you of.
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Old May 17, 2010, 9:54 PM   #19
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PS,

The d90 was tipa's advance camera of year in 2009, the T2i is tipa's advance camera of the year in 2010. If you get it, you are getting a heck of a good camera.
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Old May 18, 2010, 5:41 AM   #20
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The T2i is a very good cameras, the little difference that Tcav and I debated about will not make much of a difference base on what tizeye have inform you of.
If stabilization, video, and wide angles are important to you, Pentax is the best choice, and nothing tizeye has said changes that.
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