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Old May 25, 2010, 10:47 AM   #1
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Default Going T2i

My time to ask for advice for my next camera. Thanks in advance for the help and for the great amount of friendly knowledge i got from all the people here at Steve's.
I'm going T2i after some thoughts, departing from the GH1 14-140 initial decision (quite expensive). Besides the bigger sensor, good price-quality relationship, future lens selection, chance for bigger, better prints, etc., is the fact that I own a Speedlite 380EX TTL flash from film times which will be handy. Needs:

. Landscapes.
. Portraits. Bokeh welcome.
. Casual, people, street picks.
. A few macros.
. Some night shots.
. Video.

I canīt afford primes, so what do you think about this first setup:

. Canon T2i.
. Canon EF-S 15-85 mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM.
. Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II (or Canon 85mm 1.8 USM?).

. Accesories: Canon EW-78E lens hood | Tiffen 72mm 3 Filter Kit:UV Protector Filter, Circular Polarizer Filter, Neutral, Density 0.6 Filter | Canon ES-62 Lens Hood with Hood Adapter 62 for EF 50mm f/1.8 II | Bag, spare batteries, etc.
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Old May 25, 2010, 11:07 AM   #2
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Not a bad set up. I like the 85 F1.8 better than the 50, but that is just a personnal preference as what I shoot is better served that way. I really like the 15-85, that would be a great walk around lens (I tried the 18-55 kit and it was too short for me).
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Old May 25, 2010, 11:42 AM   #3
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The 85 will give you a good head shot prime, it is the better bokeh lens then the 50 1.8, 9 blades vs 5 blades. If the 85 is in your budget, I would look a the ef 50 1.4 also, same price range. It makes for a better full body lens.

But you do have an excellent set up from what you described. I would pass on the UV filter, but I have tiffen cpl and ND filters. And they work fine.
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Old May 25, 2010, 11:50 AM   #4
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I think the 15-85 is an excellent choice. It will be good for the landscapes, casual, people, street, and video.

The 50/1.8 would be good for couples and environmental portraits and night shots.

The 85/1.8 would be good for head & shoulders protraits, but might be long for some night shots. When you're in the dark, you need to know something is there in oder to know to point your camera at it, and the 85 can reach farther than your eye can. So it might be too long for the things you can see. and you won't know to point the camera at things that the 85 would be right for. What you might consider instead is either the Tamron 60/2.0 or Sigma 70/2.8, which might also cover the macro part.
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Old May 25, 2010, 12:32 PM   #5
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I think you have a great setup.

the t2i is a great camera. and the 15-85 is an excellent choice, one of the best normal zooms you can get on a crop body.

i think the 50 1.8 is a good and cheap first fast prime. its small, light and does reasonably well for the price.

lens hoods, yes.
do i think you really need to get all the filters, i doubt it, and unless they are really nice multicoated filters they are only going to hurt your optics. i would just get the hoods and lenses first, the hoods will protect your front element just fine. and if you find yourself needing a circpol, or ND then get a better 1 separately.
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Old May 25, 2010, 12:55 PM   #6
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Thanks all.
Hmm. I've seen only good reviews for the Tamron 60 2.0, but its $449 (with email rebate) more. Now, if i delete from the cart the Tiffen filters ($100) -as suggested by Dustin- and the 50 1.8 with hood ($130) the difference is $219, which i can afford. Does the Tamron 60 2.0 have IS? The 50 1.8 doesn't if i'm not wrong.
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Old May 25, 2010, 1:34 PM   #7
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No. Neither of them are stabilized.

What kind of macro shooting do you have in mind?
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Old May 25, 2010, 1:54 PM   #8
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Macros, real macros, very occasional. Sometimes picks of my Japanese knife collection; objects, watches, etc. No macros of flowers or insects, etc. Usually middle close ups like here. Portrait picks are prevalent over macros. But portraits will be shot hand held. I'm planning a series of portraits of workers in their own work place. I need uber detailed portraits as i'm used to medium format film picks. 27" (70 cm.) prints are not uncommon.
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Old May 25, 2010, 2:08 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ordo View Post
Macros, real macros, very occasional. Sometimes picks of my Japanese knife collection; objects, watches, etc. No macros of flowers or insects, etc. Usually middle close ups like here. Portrait picks are prevalent over macros. But portraits will be shot hand held. I'm planning a series of portraits of workers in their own work place. I need uber detailed portraits as i'm used to medium format film picks. 27" (70 cm.) prints are not uncommon.
Then either the Tamron 60/2 or the Sigma 70/2.8 should work very well. Better than the 50/1.8.
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Old May 25, 2010, 2:26 PM   #10
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I agree, the 50 1.8 is not really great for closeups. a short macro like the tammy or siggy will do great. I have the Canon 60mm 2.8 which is very similar to these lenses, and I love it for non-moving macro semi-macro work. And works really nice as a portrait lens as well, though it is a bit sharp, so i would not suggest using any unsharp mask on any portrait you take with these type lenses as all 3 are extremely sharp.
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