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Old May 27, 2010, 3:30 AM   #1
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Default D3000 + 18-105mm = Result ?

I m photo lover with intermediate knowledge of photography. I own Nikon film system. (N80 + 24mm, 50mm, 85mm)

As for my first digital SLR, I am planning to get D3000 body

http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-D3000-10.../dp/B002P8CZ3A

with 18-105mm AF-S nikkor lens. This combination will cost me around $750. I dont want to spend more than $750.
What would be the result/ output of this combination ? Any other suggestions as for camera body and lens ?

Thanks for contributions
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Old May 27, 2010, 7:01 AM   #2
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Note that if your existing lenses are not AF-S (Silent Wave Motor), then they would not Autofocus on a D3000.

The entry level Nikon bodies (D40, D40x, D60, D3000, D5000) do not have a focus motor built into the camera body like your N80 does. If you want Autofocus with a D3000, you'd need to stick with lenses that have a built in motor (like the 18-105mm AF-S lens you're looking at).

So, you may want to consider a D90 instead for more flexibility with existing lenses (as it's the least expensive body in the current Nikon lineup that has a built in focus motor).
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Old May 27, 2010, 7:41 AM   #3
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The Nikon 18-105 is a reasonably good lens, and it will autofocus on the D3000 unlike the lenses you've already got, but it does have problems with vignetting and distortion. What do you want to shoot?
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Old May 27, 2010, 8:02 AM   #4
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If you were willing to consider factory-reconditioned equipment, you can get the D5000 + the 18-55 AF-S VR lens for $519, and a factory-reconditioned Nikon 55-200 AF-S VR for another $149 from Adorama (be careful -- there is a similar lens without VR that is slapped onto some low-priced 2-lens kits). They have a 90-day guarantee from Nikon AIUI. As others have mentioned, the D5000 will not autofocus some Nikon lenses, including those you already have. But it fits within your budget and you can use the lenses you have if you are willing to manually focus them. The D5000 is as good in low light as the D90 and has the same crappy video, if that matters to you. It has an articulated LCD and live mode, if you care for that sort of thing. The LCD and viewfinder are lower quality than the D90, but no worse than the D3000. FWIW
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Old May 27, 2010, 8:28 AM   #5
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FWIW, DxOMark's take on the three least expensive Nikon dSLRs:

http://www.dxomark.com/index.php/eng...(brand3)/Nikon

The D5000 is a lot better than the D3000, and if you're going to make that jump, it would be a shame not to go a little bit further and get the body your existing lenses can AF on.
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Last edited by TCav; May 27, 2010 at 8:33 AM.
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Old May 27, 2010, 9:09 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TCav View Post
FWIW, DxOMark's take on the three least expensive Nikon dSLRs:

http://www.dxomark.com/index.php/eng...(brand3)/Nikon

The D5000 is a lot better than the D3000, and if you're going to make that jump, it would be a shame not to go a little bit further and get the body your existing lenses can AF on.
I am quite surprised that they find a measurable difference in low-light performance between the D90 and the D5000. Both have the same sensor and same processor AIUI. Do you know where the difference comes from? It seems awfully large for sample variation.
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Old May 27, 2010, 9:14 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tclune View Post
I am quite surprised that they find a measurable difference in low-light performance between the D90 and the D5000. Both have the same sensor and same processor AIUI. Do you know where the difference comes from? It seems awfully large for sample variation.
The difference is only at ISOs 3200 and 6400. It's likely that the D90 process those differently than the D5000 does. Note that the D5000 goes down to ISO 100, while the D90 starts at ISO 200, so there are differences.
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Old May 27, 2010, 9:45 AM   #8
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Quote:
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Note that the D5000 goes down to ISO 100, while the D90 starts at ISO 200, so there are differences.
Both models have the same ISO range. ;-)

ISO 200 is the lowest available standard ISO speed setting with both. But, both models have available ISO speed settings for L0.3 (equivalent to ISO 160), L0.7 (equivalent to ISO 125), and L1.0 (equivalent to ISO 100). Basically, if you use those settings, the camera is just overexposing at an actual ISO sensitivity of ISO 200, then "pulling the exposure" (reducing the values stored so that the images appear to be properly exposed) to simulate lower available ISO speeds, which reduces Dynamic Range in the Highlights if you use them.
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Old May 27, 2010, 11:30 AM   #9
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Quote:
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Both models have the same ISO range. ;-)

ISO 200 is the lowest available standard ISO speed setting with both. But, both models have available ISO speed settings for L0.3 (equivalent to ISO 160), L0.7 (equivalent to ISO 125), and L1.0 (equivalent to ISO 100).
You're right. Thanks for catching my error.
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Old May 28, 2010, 4:54 AM   #10
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Does your 24, 50, and 85mm lens have built in auto focus motor in it, ie a AF-s or AF-i lens. If not it will not focus on the D3000 or D5000. You will need to move up to the D90 if you want them to auto focus.
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