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Old May 31, 2010, 10:23 PM   #1
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Default help with selecting new camera

Hello all,

I have dived into the deep end with dlsr about 6 months ago - and find i am taking photos every day - "daily dose of dslr disease"

I like taking landscapes
I LOVE TAKING WATER shots (lake, sea, beach & river, moving and stationary)
I like taking close ups - almost macros i call em with my new "sigma 18-50 ex macro" ( i still have my kit lens but the 70-300 gives me grief with poor quality blow ups of pics)

i have a canon 1000d with kit lens but i use my sigma exclusively now.
I find i am using ISO more and more but would like a camera with better ISO quality pics at 1600-

I could blab on and on about what i like but at the moment anything takes my interest (like HDR!!)

what i am asking is for camera and lens advice
i am looking at upgrading to canon 50d but i would like feedback about Nikon and even Pentax - similar camera to the 50d.

Ultimately, i would like to make large prints of photos (from a4 to 2 feet by 2 feet?) so i guess megapixel is an issue. Also, good performer at higher ISO i guess would be good.

be easy on my wording - i am trying to use the correct wording for what i need but i still am learning

cheers for your feedback
Whiting
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Old May 31, 2010, 10:31 PM   #2
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Since you switched fro the Canon kit lens to the Sigma 18-50/2.8, do you still feel that you need to use higher ISO settings? After all, at 50mm, f/2.8 is 4 times faster than the f/5.6 you'd get with the kit lens. That means you can use ISO settings 1/4 as high.

Since you've got the Sigma 18-50/2.8, changing dSLR brands means you'd have to replace it. For that reason, I think your first choice for a new camera body should be Canon.
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Old May 31, 2010, 11:02 PM   #3
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Hi,

thanks for the suggestion...
i had a look here
http://www.sigmaphoto.com/dc-lens-compatability-chart

and for that lens it seems to suggest that i can use it on other brands?
or am i reading it wrong? I think the sigma lens is a 72 something connection?

cheers
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Old May 31, 2010, 11:12 PM   #4
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Each dSLR manufacturer has it's own lens mount, and they are not compatible with one another. Sigma makes lenses for all mounts, but a particular lens manufactured with, for instance, a Canon mount can't be used on any other brand of camera body.
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Old Jun 1, 2010, 7:19 AM   #5
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As usual, TCav has given excellent advice. I would just like to add one suggestion -- assuming money is an issue, you may want to consider getting a good ultra-wide angle zoom instead of upgrading your camera at this time. Wide angle lenses are really cool with nature shots. It's not just that you can get a nice panorama (although that's true), but you get a terrific 3D effect, where the foreground seems to be clearly closer than the background (the mirror image of how teles squish everything together front-to-back, but for visual effect the enhancing of z-axis distance is much more visually useful in most cases). Using this effect makes for some very engaging nature shots. For the ultrawide, you would want a lens that ranges from 8-12 mm up, and is rectilinear (as opposed to fisheye, which is of very limited applicability). This, and perhaps a couple of filters (polarized and GND) can give you a range of capabilities to learn to put to good effect before you worry about getting a better camera than the quite-capable one you have now. BTW, that 72-something connection you mentioned was probably a 72mm size for the filters, which screw onto the front of the lens. If the ultrawide zoom you get has a different filter size, you'd need to either buy two sets of filters or just get filters for one of the lenses. To start, at least, a filter set for the 18-50mm lens makes the most sense to me, and it never makes any sense to put a polarizer on a wide-angle lens AFAICS. Just my ill-informed opnion, FWIW.
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Old Jun 1, 2010, 7:55 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tclune View Post
... it never makes any sense to put a polarizer on a wide-angle lens ...
Correct. At wider angles of view, a polarizing filter will cause vignetting.

And thank you.
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Old Jun 1, 2010, 4:44 PM   #7
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Hi,
thank you both for thoughtful replies...
hmmm....ultra wide angle zoom?
would any of these fit the bill..
http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/digi...comparison.htm
Nikon 12 - 24 mm f/4,
Tokina 12 - 24 mm f/4,
Sigma 10 - 20 mm f/4 - 5.6
and Tamron 11 - 18 mm f/4.5 - 5.6



i'd probably lean toward the Tokina? but i have no idea really

or should i go for
http://www.slrphotographyguide.com/c...ape-lens.shtml
Canon EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM (ultra wide angle zoom lens)
Canon EF 24-105mm f/4 L IS USM (wide angle zoom lens)
Canon EF 17-40mm f/4.0 L USM (ultra wide angle zoom lens)
"One of Canon's best selling lens due to it's low cost, considering it's high quality. If you see a Canon lens with a red circle around the tip, you know it's considered better quality (sharper images) than those without the ring."

It seems an ultra wide angle zoom is below 24mm mark from my brief readings. Also the above is interesting..."a red circle" denotes better quality??
I never paid attention to the coloring of the lens tip - do people look at this?


thanks for your feedback
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Old Jun 1, 2010, 6:20 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whiting View Post
It seems an ultra wide angle zoom is below 24mm mark from my brief readings.
That's for a full-frame sensor. Your camera has a crop factor of 1.6 if I'm not mistaken. So, to convert that 24mm into terms applicable to your camera, divide 24/1.6, and ultrawide lenses on your camera would be 15mm or less. So none of the Canon lenses you list would get you there -- and none of them would be a noticeable improvement in angle of view over the Sigma you have now. All the others would qualify, although I doubt that the Nikon is available for Canon cameras. The others would all be contenders. The usual sites that are listed here for evaluation of lenses may help you decide between these three lenses. AIUI, they are all well-regarded. There is also a new 8-16mm lens from Tamron if memory serves, but I don't know if it has been evaluated yet.

ETA: I looked it up, and the 8-16mm lens is new from Sigma, not Tamron. FWIW

Last edited by tclune; Jun 1, 2010 at 8:11 PM.
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Old Jun 1, 2010, 7:56 PM   #9
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The Canon 17-85 has a lot of vignetting at the wide end. If you're serious about shooting at wide angels, you could do better.

The Canon 17-40 is nice, but it's not a lot better than the Sigma 18-50/2.8 you already have.
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Old Jun 1, 2010, 9:03 PM   #10
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I would also look at the tokina 11-16mm 2.8 for the canon. It is a very good wide angle for the APS-C cameras
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