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Old Jun 6, 2010, 11:43 AM   #11
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I'm looking to buy a DSLR. I've never had one before so I'm new to the world of DSLRs. Right now I have my eye on either Nikon D3000 or Canon Rebel XS or XSI. Honestly, I have no clue which way to go.
I shoot a variety of everything, but mainly looking for something good for shoot landscapes, upclose, and low light/night photos.
One big problem with the D3000 for your intended use is that it doesn't have a "Live" mode. If you're like me, when you shoot macro or up-close images, you will want to have a fully zoomed "Live" image for checking that you are in focus where you want to be. I don't know about the capabilities of the other camera, but that was one of the big limitations of the D3000 vis-a-vis the D5000 in my mind. FWIW
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Old Jun 6, 2010, 11:54 AM   #12
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One big problem with the D3000 for your intended use is that it doesn't have a "Live" mode. If you're like me, when you shoot macro or up-close images, you will want to have a fully zoomed "Live" image for checking that you are in focus where you want to be. I don't know about the capabilities of the other camera, but that was one of the big limitations of the D3000 vis-a-vis the D5000 in my mind. FWIW
I would hesitate to call it a BIG problem. I've been shooting macro for years without 'Live View', and I've had much success using the optical viewfinder, occasionally assisted by a right angle viewer, without any trouble. And using 'Live View' fully zoomed might let you quickly check focus, but it's a pain for checking the depth of field.

What I would call a big problem with the D3000 and macrophotography, is that there are only five macro lenses that will autofocus on the D3000, only two of them are stabilized, an they're both pretty expensive.
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Old Jun 6, 2010, 2:09 PM   #13
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No, the Canon XS and XSi do NOT have image stabilization, Sony, Pentax and Olympus only have in body image stabilization.

Nikon and Canon want you to get image stabilization in their lenses.

Sarah Joyce

If i don't get the image stabilization in the lens, does it make that big of a difference. I have a tripod that I usually use
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Old Jun 6, 2010, 2:17 PM   #14
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I guess we think along different lines. I know that there are times in low light environments when I will have a measurably slow shutter speeds. That is when IS can make a real difference.

And no, I do not carry a tripod into every single photo situation. So in body IS is a big asset as every lens mounted gains the benefit of IS. Perhaps your workflow is different.

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Old Jun 6, 2010, 2:31 PM   #15
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If i don't get the image stabilization in the lens, does it make that big of a difference. I have a tripod that I usually use
If you usually use your tripod for your close-up and low light photography, then you don't need IS. But if you'd like to not have to use it for those things, then IS is the way to go.
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Old Jun 6, 2010, 3:30 PM   #16
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If i don't get the image stabilization in the lens, does it make that big of a difference. I have a tripod that I usually use
If you are shooting on a tripod, you will want the image stabilization turn of, as it will cause camera shake when shooting on a tripod.
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Old Jun 6, 2010, 6:03 PM   #17
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if you want an entry level camera but with stabisation in the body and good low light performance wouldn't the pentax k-x be the obvious choice?

though nikon and canon certainly have more glass availble - pentax isn't to badly served (and they have some fantastic fast primes) unless your wanting over 500mm telephoto
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Old Jun 6, 2010, 6:19 PM   #18
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What I would call a big problem with the D3000 and macrophotography, is that there are only five macro lenses that will autofocus on the D3000, only two of them are stabilized, an they're both pretty expensive.
I wouldn't consider these issues problems. First, Af isn't a huge deal in Macro photography, as many do their focusing manually since you are dealing with such shallow DOF and relying on AF to get it right isn't always the best choice. Stabilization also isn't a huge deal as you're mostly (or at least should be) shooting on a tripod and stabilizaion becomes less effective as your get to minimum focusing distances. Nikon even recommends VR be turned off for macro work in the manual.

That being said if you will be using this lens for general purposes in addition to macro, these things do become more important.
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Old Jun 6, 2010, 7:16 PM   #19
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If you want to use a macro lens for a portrait lens then it is an issue without AF.
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Old Jun 6, 2010, 7:16 PM   #20
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I wouldn't consider these issues problems. First, Af isn't a huge deal in Macro photography, as many do their focusing manually since you are dealing with such shallow DOF and relying on AF to get it right isn't always the best choice.
I understand. But I also understand that the focusing screens in AF dSLRs and SLRs aren't as good for manual focusing as the older focusing screens wilt the split image rangefinders and the microprism rings in MF SLRs. Frequently, AF systems are better at focusing than MFing, even in macrophotography.

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Stabilization also isn't a huge deal as you're mostly (or at least should be) shooting on a tripod and stabilizaion becomes less effective as your get to minimum focusing distances. Nikon even recommends VR be turned off for macro work in the manual.
Would those be the manuals for the AF-S DX Micro NIKKOR 85mm f/3.5G ED VR and AF-S VR Micro-Nikkor 105mm f/2.8G IF-ED? I Agree that, at 1:1, image stabilization probably isn't very useful, but certainly at 1:2, having it is better than not having it.
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