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Old Jun 10, 2010, 8:52 AM   #1
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Default Entry level dSLR

Hi All,

I am planning to put my hand on a good entry lvl DSLR. Please guide me through it.

I am a student and wish to upgrade to DSLR zone from point-shoot cameras. 500USD is what i am considering most at this moment for my 1st investment.
The main reason for better photo quality and learning manual controls in DSLR.

I have 2 prime environment for shooting
1. home/party/park
2.garden/museum (particular focus)
3.outdoor photography/natural scenes /tourist photography while traveling
(traveling doesnt means i will take photos from moving car/train but i travels a lot and love to shoot in new places)

i tried to compare some entry lvl slrs and with my understanding, i short listed 2 models. please review and share your opinions.

1.Nikon D300 with 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G ED AF-S DX VR lens
2.Olympus E 520 with 14-42mm Zoom Lens & 40-150mm f/4.0-5.6 Zoom Lens

both the offers are from adoroma and comes in the package(nikon:body+1 lens :: Oly:body+2 lens).

Regards
Asmit
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Old Jun 10, 2010, 9:02 AM   #2
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The D300 is not an entry level model. Are you sure you don't mean the D3000 instead?

I see you're in India. My suggestion would be to buy a camera in India if you want to get local service for it. Note that Nikon regional distributors will often refuse to service a camera that was not intended for sale in the region you live in, even if you are willing to pay them for the service.

These are referred to as Grey (or Gray) Market Cameras when you live in one area and buy one from another area to save money, instead of buying them from an authorized Nikon distributor in your area. So, if something went wrong, that means you may need to send it back to the U.S. for service if you buy a camera intended for sale in the U.S. from an Authorized dealer in the U.S.

Here's a quote from the Nikon web site in your region:

Quote:
What does owning a "Grey Market" Nikon product mean to you?

Nikon Authorised Distributor in a country cannot provide any technical support or warranty service on Grey Market items. Additionally they cannot perform any fee-based repair work on Grey Market items. Please do not contact any Nikon Authorised Distributors for help with any Grey Market products. Please contact the reseller or importer of your Grey Market items for warranty and service information as well as software updates and downloads.
See more here:
http://nikonasia-en.custhelp.com/cgi...hp?p_faqid=630

You'll find a list of Authorized Nikon distributors in India on this page:

http://home.nikon-asia.com/distributors.php
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Old Jun 10, 2010, 10:10 AM   #3
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Olympus has an international warranty policy unlike nikon. So you are covered anywhere they sell olympus.

I have olympus products I have brought from asia, america and europe. And had no problems with service in the different regions of the world. Just make sure you keep the international warranty card in the camera and your receipt.
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Old Jun 10, 2010, 10:38 AM   #4
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masterasmit,

There are lots of entry level dSLRs that can do what you want. There are lots of reasons to buy one but not another, and if I were to apply some of those reasons, the Nikon D3000 and the Olympus E-520 would be two early casualties. Could you fill us in on how you narrowed your selection down to these?
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Old Jun 10, 2010, 10:54 AM   #5
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masterasmi:

Note that I've moved your post (and the replies to it) to a new thread now, so that we're not taking over another member's thread.
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Old Jun 10, 2010, 11:05 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimC View Post
The D300 is not an entry level model. Are you sure you don't mean the D3000 instead?

I see you're in India. My suggestion would be to buy a camera in India if you want to get local service for it. Note that Nikon regional distributors will often refuse to service a camera that was not intended for sale in the region you live in, even if you are willing to pay them for the service.

These are referred to as Grey (or Gray) Market Cameras when you live in one area and buy one from another area to save money, instead of buying them from an authorized Nikon distributor in your area. So, if something went wrong, that means you may need to send it back to the U.S. for service if you buy a camera intended for sale in the U.S. from an Authorized dealer in the U.S.

Here's a quote from the Nikon web site in your region:

See more here:
http://nikonasia-en.custhelp.com/cgi...hp?p_faqid=630

You'll find a list of Authorized Nikon distributors in India on this page:

http://home.nikon-asia.com/distributors.php
Yeah, it was typo mistake from my side. i meant D3000. Inn August I am going to Sweden for my master studies. so even if i am buying a nikon camera in India, it wont cover warranty at sweden....
now i have 2 months free time, so i was planning to get one and start shooting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shoturtle View Post
Olympus has an international warranty policy unlike nikon. So you are covered anywhere they sell olympus.

I have olympus products I have brought from asia, america and europe. And had no problems with service in the different regions of the world. Just make sure you keep the international warranty card in the camera and your receipt.
I am eyeing on adorama. does it gives international warranty on request?

Quote:
Originally Posted by TCav View Post
masterasmit,

There are lots of entry level dSLRs that can do what you want. There are lots of reasons to buy one but not another, and if I were to apply some of those reasons, the Nikon D3000 and the Olympus E-520 would be two early casualties. Could you fill us in on how you narrowed your selection down to these?
I really like Nikon products and D3000 is their newest entry lvl dslr took over D40 and D60. I heard from every aspects it is a very best camera for learners with guiding you throughout shooting.

Canon: dont know why, i didnt like canon products, may be they r the best, but i dont feel good while holding canon eos 1000D.

Pentax : K-x are good, but AA battery.

Sony: i heard in low light it does nt perform well.

Oly : i saw all basic feature need, has been loaded in e520, like image stabilizer, good shutter speed, small body,dust reduction, performs well in low light ... .... ....

please let me know other competitive models for entry level.
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Old Jun 10, 2010, 12:11 PM   #7
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The Nikon D3000 is good, but I wouldn't give it the stellar reviews you seem to be coming accross.

Sony makes most of the image sensors for Nikon, so I'm supprised that someone would have told you that the Nikon was great and the Sony was poor. And Sony entry level dSLRs also have a menu structure that is very easy to use, and they have features that the D3000 doesn't.

Olympus dSLRs are nice, plus they're small and light, but they're not great at everything, especially in low light.
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Old Jun 10, 2010, 12:28 PM   #8
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I have a Nikon D90 and I'm very pleased with it. The Nikon D40 and D60 were also nice camera's. Canon also makes very good cameras but I'm not sure they are "the best". If it doesn't feel good then don't take it. The feel of a camera is also important. Ken Rockwell, a reviewer that is usually very pro Nikon, thinks the D3000 is the worst DSLR Nikon ever made. He prefers the D5000 and the older D40. (whether we should believe ken is another point.)

I've read some good reviews of the Sony DSLRs however their lenses were rather expensive. I didn't buy Sony because of the lens prices.


It really depends on what you want and need. For example some people prefer to feel a heavy camera in their hands. Others might prefer a light one for travel. The kit lenses you mention do not zoom very far. I started with the same requirements as you and I am very satisfied with my Nikon 18-105mm VR kit lens. The upgrade probably won't cost that much.

Last edited by korna; Jun 10, 2010 at 12:30 PM. Reason: revised after TCav's post
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Old Jun 10, 2010, 1:33 PM   #9
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Quote:
I've read some good reviews of the Sony DSLRs however their lenses were rather expensive. I didn't buy Sony because of the lens prices.
Well.. keep in mind that the Sony dSLR models can use any Minolta Autofocus lens ever made (and they'd still have Autofocus, and they'd all be stabilized on any Sony dSLR body).

You also have lens choices from third party vendors like Tamron and Sigma (and again, they'd all be stabilized on a Sony dSLR body).

Now, some lenses can be a bit pricey in the Sony lineup (even given Minolta AF alternatives) within some niches (for example, Sony doesn't have any inexpensive 85mm f/1.8 primes; only offering brighter f/1.4 versions instead). So, it would be a good idea to make sure any lenses you're interested in are available at the price you want.

Quote:
I am eyeing on adorama. does it gives international warranty on request?
It wouldn't hurt to send them an e-mail asking about it. But, I doubt it (they'd probably need you to return a camera to them if you had issues; as it's unlikely they'd have relationships worked out with repair facilities elsewhere that had the parts and expertise to correct any serious problems). I'd ask to make sure, though.

You're going to have service issues buying any Nikon dSLR model (and many other camera models for that matter) from a vendor located outside of the area the camera was intended for sale in; unless you're willing to send the camera back to the region it was intended for sale in (which could involve shipping costs, import problems with tariffs and duties, etc.), or back to Japan.

Now, moving from one area to another may offer some exceptions if you purchased the camera from an authorized dealer in region you lived in and moved later. But, I'm no expert on how that would work and you'd be better off contacting the vendors and manufacturers to ask about it (and I'd get anything like that in writing). ;-)

The Nikon D3000 uses a Sony 10MP CCD Sensor (as does the Nikon D40x, Nikon D60; Sony A200, Sony A230; Pentax K2000; Pentax K200D, and more (including a number of older models than the ones I'm mentioning from Sony, Nikon and Pentax).

You will tend to see a variety of differences between them, even though they're all using Sony 10MP CCD Sensors, because of different Anti-Alias filters, different noise reduction/image processing algorithms, different Autofocus systems, features, and more. But, Image Quality is not going to be a lot different between models manufactured at roughly the same time using the same Sony sensor type, especially shooting raw versus jpeg; after you tweak the camera settings for things like amount of Noise Reduction being applied, etc. (and different models use different amounts for a given setting with their defaults).

Shoot RAW with NR set lower and you can minimize differences between models using the same sensor type (although you'll still see some differences between them for a variety of reasons, you won't have as much shooting RAW). The biggest difference with similar sensors tends to come down to noise reduction algorithms being used (and if you shoot RAW versus JPEG, you can minimize most of those differences with the same raw converter), with some manufacturers offering more advanced NR algorithms (with some tradeoffs to any approach).

If budget permits, I'd step up to a model using a Sony 12MP CMOS Sensor instead (Nikon D5000, Nikon D90, Nikon D300/D300s; Sony A500, Sony A700; and Pentax K-x) as the 12MP Sony CMOS sensors do a bit better at higher ISO speed settings. But, if you don't care about using one at very high ISO speeds, then the Sony 10MP CCD sensor is really not bad at all. I'd try out the models you're interested in if you can find a store with demos. You'll want to make sure you're comfortable with them.

I'd also make sure you are happy with the available lenses for them.
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Old Jun 10, 2010, 2:10 PM   #10
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Hi,
it seems sony is having more impressive machines that professionals like them.

please tell me 2-3 sony's entry lvl dslr with lens kit.

Thanks in advance.
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