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Old Jun 17, 2010, 11:40 PM   #1
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Default Better than a Nikon D5000?

Is there a camera thats better or as good as a Nikon D5000 for cheaper? My favorite thing about the D5000 or the D3000 is that it has a flip screen. I am soooo paranoid about scratching lenses and screens.
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Old Jun 17, 2010, 11:46 PM   #2
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There are better camera's out there the then d5000, but not with a flip screen. The pentax K-x is an excellent camera, but does not have a flip screen. With a flip screen only sony has flip screens, but the a3xx series are not as good as the d5000.

Have you consider putting a schott glass screen protector on it. You will not be able to scratch schott glass from giottos.
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Old Jun 18, 2010, 3:06 AM   #3
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wow man do you ever sleep? lol.

Im not exactly bent on it but with the flip screen I don't have to worry about scratching it at all.

anyway, whats better then the D5000 but cheaper?
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Old Jun 18, 2010, 3:16 AM   #4
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Pentax K-x has had some good reviews. Been reading up on that myself.
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Old Jun 18, 2010, 3:29 AM   #5
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That is what happens when you live in 2 different continents,

But yeah the K-x is also less expensive then the d5000, it is new for 520 dollars new at adorama. It has better low light shooting ability and better AF system then the d5000.

Actually you do have to worry about scratches also, if there is any dirt that is on the screen, when you flip it backwards, it can scratch in the storage position. I would at least put a plastic film on it anyways.



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Originally Posted by Trihame View Post
wow man do you ever sleep? lol.

Im not exactly bent on it but with the flip screen I don't have to worry about scratching it at all.

anyway, whats better then the D5000 but cheaper?
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Old Jun 18, 2010, 3:36 AM   #6
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Yes it has, it is an excellent camera. That is why it was name tipa's top entry level. I shoot a more expensive camera, and when I borrow my brothers k-x. I am very impress with it.

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Pentax K-x has had some good reviews. Been reading up on that myself.
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Old Jun 18, 2010, 4:48 AM   #7
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Quote:
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... I am soooo paranoid about scratching lenses and screens.
Keep in mind that an articulating screen is more likely to fail than a screen that doesn't articulate. More moving parts = lower reliability.
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Old Jun 18, 2010, 5:40 AM   #8
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Quote:
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Keep in mind that an articulating screen is more likely to fail than a screen that doesn't articulate. More moving parts = lower reliability.

In addition, the LCD screens on DSLR's are really tough. It takes a lot to scratch them, and what would scratch it is not likely to happen during storage, which is when you'll have the screen flipped around. Unless you are completely anal and flipped it around after every shot and flip it back when ready to shoot. As was mentioned there are many screen protectors out there which all do a very good job.
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Old Jun 18, 2010, 12:00 PM   #9
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So, does the Non-lighting up AF spots put anybody off of the Paentax K-x? Does it really matter that they don't light up?
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Old Jun 18, 2010, 12:17 PM   #10
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So, does the Non-lighting up AF spots put anybody off of the Paentax K-x? Does it really matter that they don't light up?
The answer is - It depends on how you use the tool. People often make the erroneous decision that everyone else shoots the same way they do. That isn't always true.

Now, like most dslrs, the K-X allows you to specify whether a single focus point (selected by YOU the photographer) will be used or whether the camera is free to use whichever point(s) it thinks is appropriate.

Now, if you select the focus point then when you get the focus confirmation from the camera you know you're good to go. All you have to do is make sure the point you chose was over the place you wanted to be in focus. If this is the technique you follow, the missing light isn't very impactful. Now, the most common variant of this approach is to always use the center focus point only. Put that over your subject, half-press the shutter button (to lock focus), recompose the framing and then take the photo.

However, if you prefer to allow the camera to choose the focus point for you, the lack of the light can be problematic. The camera will tell you it has achieved focus but you don't necessarily know whether your subject was in focus. If the camera focused on another object instead and that object was significantly different in range from your subject then it's pretty obvious the camera was focusing on the wrong thing. However. if the object is closer it can be difficult to tell - especially with the small view finders of many DSLRs. So you don't find out until later when you see the photo on your PC - or if you zoom in on the LCD playback that the focus was off. If you employ this method then that missing feature can be problematic.

For my part I use both methods with my camera. The benefit of using a single focus point is you gain more control - you don't risk the camera focusing on the wrong thing. The downside is - it may be difficult for the camera to gain focus on that part of your subject that is under a single focus point. And, if multiple focus points are on your subject the camera gets a more accurate focus. So, I'll often use multiple points when taking photos of groups or even single subjects when DOF isn't critically shallow.

Some people always use center only. And some people always use all points.
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