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Old Jun 22, 2010, 3:51 AM   #11
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Bart:

Note that when you use a lens on a model like the Pentax K-x with an APS-C size sensor, you'll have a narrower angle of view (more apparent magnification) for a given focal length compared to the same focal length lens on a 35mm camera. Multiply the focal length by 1.5x to see how they compare for models using a Sony APS-C size sensor (as the K-x uses). For example, a 100mm lens on a K-x would give you the same angle of view as a 150mm lens on a 35mm camera. For Canon models with an APS-C size sensor (Canon APS-C sze sensors are slightly smaller than the Sony APS-C size sensors used in models like the Pentax K-x), use 1.6x to see how they compare.

That's the reason the kit lenses usually start out at around 18mm (because you'll have a narrower angle of view). So, an 18-125mm lens on a K-x would give you approximately the same angle of view you'd have using a 27-188mm lens on a 35mm camera.

In other words, the smaller the sensor or film size, the narrower the angle of view for a given focal length lens. For example, because the sensor in your DiMAGE A200 is much smaller than the APS-C size sensors used in a dSLR (your A200 uses a Sony 2/3" CCD), it's 7.2-50mm lens gives you the same angle of view you'd have using a 28-200mm lens on a 35mm camera. They just note the "35mm equivalent" focal length in it's specifications as 28-200mm (when the actual focal length of it's lens is only 7.2-50mm).

But, with a dSLR model, only the actual focal lengths of the lenses are noted in their specifications. So, when lens shopping for a camera with an APS-C size sensor, remember to multiply the focal length by 1.5x to get an idea of what lens would give you the same angle of view on a 35mm camera.

As for lens compatibility, you have to buy the lens with the correct mount. For example, Sigma makes an 18-125mm lens for Canon, Nikon, Sony/Minolta and Pentax dSLR models (and each one has a unique lens mount). The camera mount a given lens is designed to fit will be shown in it's listing when shopping for one at a vendor.

That's common with third party lenses from vendors like Tamron and Sigma. They offer the same lens models in multiple camera mounts (and the lenses you're looking at are available for Nikon, Canon, Pentax and Sony dSLR models), but you need to make sure you buy the one that is designed for the camera you're using.

Note that as a general rule of thumb, a Super Zoom type lens is not as good as having multiple lenses with less ambitious ranges from wide to long that cover the same total focal range.

So, I'd compare them carefully before deciding (using sites like http://www.photozone.de and http://www.slrgear.com to see how they test). As for the Tamron 18-200mm, I'd suggest looking at the Tamron 18-250mm instead if you really want to go with a lens with that much focal range from wide to long. Even though it's longer than the Tamron 18-200mm, the 18-250mm is a higher quality lens. An 18-250mm lens on a model like the Pentax K-x would give you the same angle of view you'd have using a 27-375mm lens on a 35mm camera.
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Old Jun 22, 2010, 7:41 AM   #12
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The reason I suggested the Sigma 18-125 is just that it provides very similar reach to the the lens on the A200. If you want even longer reach, then an 18- 250 lens is available from Tamron, Sigma, or Pentax . These are considerably more expensive, though, and since you had mentioned a budget..... The Pentax body has built-in anti-shake, similar to what you are used to on the A200, and will work with any lens you put on it. It also seems to have the cleanest looking, high ISO pictures, so it is what I thought of when you mentioned noise in some of your low light photos. Another entry level DSLR would work, also, but all of them don't have the image stabilization built in to the body, so the lens choice with some could be more expensive.

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Old Jun 22, 2010, 7:52 AM   #13
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Let me just throw this out there if you want a good point and shoot with a good zoom try the Fuji HS10. It can be had for under $500. The zoom is longer than you want but is a very good zoom.....

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Old Jun 22, 2010, 8:00 AM   #14
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try the Fuji HS10.
Yes, now I've come and across it, I'm seriously considering it.
It might be interesting to experiment and see what use I can make of the really long zoom if I have it.
BTW, when you call it a 'point and shoot', I assume you simply mean 'not DSLR'.
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Old Jun 22, 2010, 8:23 AM   #15
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Right... "Point and Shoot" is a loosely used term when discussing models that are not dSLRs, even if they are "dSLR like" except for the lack of interchangeable lenses and a mirror (the reflex part).

Just to confuse things more.... now we have a new class of cameras that are not dSLR models, yet have interchangeable lenses. For example, the new Olympus and Panasonic Micro 4/3 models, the new Sony NEX models and the Samsung NX10.

The jury is still out on what to call these cameras. Some people like the term EVIL (Electronic Viewfinder Interchangeable Lens).

But, I'm not particularly fond of that designation (because of how EVIL sounds as a word, and the fact that all of them don't have Electronic Viewfinders, unless you want to consider their LCD the Electronic Viewfinder).
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Old Jun 22, 2010, 8:28 AM   #16
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P.S.

Rather than create an entirely new section for these new "EVIL" camera types (as the forums were already broken down into separate sections for Point and Shoot and dSLR models, with manufacturers under each section), I just changed the name of the existing dSLR section to "dSLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras", and added separate forums for those new models (Olympus Micro 4/3, Panasonic Micro 4/3, Sony NEX, Samsung NX) within that section:

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/#d...e-lens-cameras

The lines are starting to become very blurred between different camera types anymore (what's a point and shoot, what's a dSLR, what's a video camera, etc.). :-)
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Old Jun 23, 2010, 10:25 AM   #17
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For a DSLR + big zoom combination, the most attractive package deal I can find here in the Netherlands is this:
Nikon D3000 body +Sigma 18-200mm OS (stabilizer), E559

I’m comparing this option with non-DSLR options such as:
Fuji FinePix HS10 (zoom 24-720) at E429
PanasonicLumix DMC-FZ38 (aka 35 in USA I believe) (zoom 27-480) at E309

The questions arise:
Is it worth paying the extra money to get the HS10 rather than the FZ38?
Is it worth paying the extra money to get Nikon/Sigma rather than the HS10 or FZ38?

Tricky. Any views?
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Old Jun 23, 2010, 11:41 AM   #18
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Bart-

It really depends on the type of photos that you are shooting.

Personally, my focus would be on the Fuji HS-10 and the Panasonic FZ-38. Both are very good cameras, with the HS-10 leading the way.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jun 23, 2010, 1:06 PM   #19
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Bart-

It really depends on the type of photos that you are shooting.
Sarah, the most challenging photos that I take in much quantity are inside buildings, often in poor light.

Bart
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Old Jun 23, 2010, 3:19 PM   #20
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Bart-

I know from a lot of personal experience, that the FZ-35/38 tops out at ISO 800. I have no real hands-on experience with the HS-10. If inside buildings is where you do the majority of photos. Then I don't think that either of these super zoom cameras are a good choice.

You will really be more pleased with images from a camera such as the Canon XS or the Nikon D-5000 with a very good wide angle lens.

Sarah Joyce
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