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Old Jul 14, 2010, 4:38 AM   #11
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I am still pondering what to get myself!! Still cant decide. Been ages since i first asked on these fine forums.

I like the Canon 450D, The Sony A290, Nikon D3000 also the Pentax K-x but put off by the non-lighting up of the AF points. Olympus looks good but not researched them a lot yet.

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Old Jul 14, 2010, 4:45 PM   #12
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the filter are easy to find for the epl-1 kit lens, 40.5 is a lecia lens size. Tiffen and hoya and bw have filters for it at bh and adorama.

What can of marco adjustments are you looking to do?

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Originally Posted by photophreak View Post
You might also consider the Olympus E-620. Compact, nice build quality, sharp photos, and a very handy flip screen. It's one of Steve's Best. The IS is built into the body. This means that you don't pay for it when buying lenses.

The E-PL1 is great... I have both. The E-620 is a better value if you want SLR quality. Well withing your budget with one lens and just over with 2. The E-PL1 will run you over budget with a viewfinder, and you will want one for sure. The E-620 does not shoot video, and the E-PL1 does. Mind you, my E-PL1 is going for repairs now because the video does not work properly.

You will have trouble finding filters for the E-PL1 lenses, no problem with the E-620.

If you are a "live view shooter", you will run the battery down quickly on the E-620 as in many SLRs, as the sensor stays constantly charged in this mode. With "EVIL" cameras, you won't get the battery drain as the mechanism is different. For myself, I really like a nice optical viewfinder that never fails, inside or out.

The SLRs will also give you full control over manual macro adjustments, which are not available on the E-PL1 - very annoying for me. I haven't found a way around it yet.

I like the intuitive feel of Canon menus over Olympus, but Oly can most definitely hold it's own for image quality against the mid-range APS-C's out there with their great lens and processor quality.

Hope this helps. Good luck!
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Old Jul 16, 2010, 3:13 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shoturtle View Post
the filter are easy to find for the epl-1 kit lens, 40.5 is a lecia lens size. Tiffen and hoya and bw have filters for it at bh and adorama.

What can of marco adjustments are you looking to do?
I'm not sure what type of filters you are talking about, but the last 3 that I purchased were not available in 40.5mm. - NDx8, ND110, and circ polarizer. That was 2 months ago. Let me know where to get them in 40.5.

The "macro" setting on the E-PL1 has been put into the "Scene" modes, which are a consumer oriented quick fix for beginner photographers. You do not have access to any adjustments- aperture, shutter speed, white balance, etc.

I often shoot macro over dark or light backgrounds, and the "macro" on this camera is useless without even basic exposure compensation. Had I not had alternate cameras to shoot macro, I definitely would not have purchased the E-PL1.

Having said that, it might be fine for pebblezs as a starter camera, as he/she is looking for entry level equipment.
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Old Jul 16, 2010, 9:58 AM   #14
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Ok, in the scene mode, I never use them, When I shoot macro, I shoot them the aperture mode.
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Old Jul 16, 2010, 10:55 AM   #15
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Photophreak: Thank you for providing the difference. This helps me reconsider purchasing the E-PL1.
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Old Jul 16, 2010, 6:04 PM   #16
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The EPL-1 with a inexpensive marco lens and 4/3 adapter does a heck of a job for under 300 dollars. I shoot macro with a olympus 35mm 3.5 macro lens in Aperture mode and it works great. It okay with the kit lens, but nothing beats a true macro lens.

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/ol...my-garden.html
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Old Aug 18, 2010, 8:14 PM   #17
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I keep forgetting I live on 2 continents so leica size filter are pretty easy to fine in germany.

But I have a bunch of hoya ND filter, and cpl for the epl-1 that I found at bh or adorama. They carry about 90 different filter at 40.5mm.

The macro filter that is in the scene mode is really design to shoot outdoor handheld close up, not true macro. If you are going to shoot indoor or more in-depth macro, you will want to shoot in manual or aperture mode, with full EV control. But to be fair, dslr put into a macro scene mode will not let you set ev either.

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Originally Posted by photophreak View Post
I'm not sure what type of filters you are talking about, but the last 3 that I purchased were not available in 40.5mm. - NDx8, ND110, and circ polarizer. That was 2 months ago. Let me know where to get them in 40.5.

The "macro" setting on the E-PL1 has been put into the "Scene" modes, which are a consumer oriented quick fix for beginner photographers. You do not have access to any adjustments- aperture, shutter speed, white balance, etc.

I often shoot macro over dark or light backgrounds, and the "macro" on this camera is useless without even basic exposure compensation. Had I not had alternate cameras to shoot macro, I definitely would not have purchased the E-PL1.

Having said that, it might be fine for pebblezs as a starter camera, as he/she is looking for entry level equipment.
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Old Aug 18, 2010, 10:20 PM   #18
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The question: What entry-level dSLR?

My story: I've been shooting a long time, gave up film around 1990, went digital in 2002, got my first dSLR a couple years ago. The dSLR came because I inherited some money, and I wasn't totally satisfied with my 5mpx Sony DSC-V1 P&S. I asked myself, "What do I want to do that I can't do with what I have?" The answers: fisheye, long, and low light.

In the past I've owned Canon, Olympus, Sony, and I leaned towards one of those brands; but I approached the dSLR quest totally agnostic. I did MUCH research, applying my systems analysis training: lists, charts, spreadsheets, etc. First, I looked for the lenses I wanted; THEN I looked for a camera to hang them on. Pentax and Olympus made what I wanted at prices I could afford. After reading many user complaints and wishes that they could upgrade their Canikonympus bodies as soon as possible, I decided on Pentax: K20D, DA10-17, DA18-250, FA50/1.4, AF360 flash. And many more lenses since then, mostly cheap used manual primes.

And now, to the point: I considered and handled a number of entry-level dSLRs. And I thought, "Do I want to spend money on a camera that I'll want to upgrade soon?" The answer: NO. I am no longer employed. I can't afford to upgrade cars, computers, cameras, phones etc on a regular basis. I wanted a dSLR that I would be HAPPY with for as long as possible. For me that meant: rugged, good feature set, lotsa megapickles, few complaints. And just over two years ago, the best bang-per-buck was the Pentax K20D. I'm quite happy, and I'm sure I'll stay happy for a few more years.

So I urge you: think carefully about what entry-level means. IMHO too many beginner's dSLRs are substandard, produced to make customers WANT and NEED to buy something else, soon. These are NOT made to anywhere near the same standards as professional gear.

Also remember that a camera is a box upon which to hang lenses. Digital cameras are good for a few years. Good lenses can last many decades; I use some over a century old. Buying a camera means marrying-into a lens system, and divorce is expensive. More lenses are available for Pentax than for any other brand. Any Pentax-compatible lens EVER MADE will work on a Pentax dSLR, unlike other brands that have changed their lens mounts. Such lenses can also be adapted to Canon and Olympus dSLRs, and to some extent to Sony and Nikon too, but with limitations.

Keep in mind that Pentax, Sony, and Olympus (on some bodies), have in-body image stabilization / shake reduction. ANY lens put on these bodies can be stabilized, not just IS glass. And IS/SR *does* make a difference. I consider this a major down-check for Nikon and Canon.
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

So anyway, think about how much an entry-level system will cost in the long run. Think about what lenses you want, and what for. Take a look a used lens prices online. Think about IS/SR, and the cost of NOT having in-body IS. Think about whether your camera should feel solid or plasticky. Good luck!
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Old Aug 18, 2010, 10:22 PM   #19
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But the OP showed interest in the other options. And the epl-1 uses a dslr sensor.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RioRico View Post
The question: What entry-level dSLR?

My story: I've been shooting a long time, gave up film around 1990, went digital in 2002, got my first dSLR a couple years ago. The dSLR came because I inherited some money, and I wasn't totally satisfied with my 5mpx Sony DSC-V1 P&S. I asked myself, "What do I want to do that I can't do with what I have?" The answers: fisheye, long, and low light.

In the past I've owned Canon, Olympus, Sony, and I leaned towards one of those brands; but I approached the dSLR quest totally agnostic. I did MUCH research, applying my systems analysis training: lists, charts, spreadsheets, etc. First, I looked for the lenses I wanted; THEN I looked for a camera to hang them on. Pentax and Olympus made what I wanted at prices I could afford. After reading many user complaints and wishes that they could upgrade their Canikonympus bodies as soon as possible, I decided on Pentax. K20D, DA10-17, DA18-250, FA50/1.4. And many more lenses since then, mostly cheap used manual primes.

And now, to the point: I considered and handled a number of entry-level dSLRs. And I thought, "Do I want to spend money on a camera that I'll want to upgrade soon?" The answer: NO. I am no longer employed. I can't afford to upgrade cars, computers, cameras, phones etc on a regular basis. I wanted a dSLR that I would be HAPPY with for as long as possible. For me that meant: rugged, good feature set, lotsa megapickles, few complaints. And just over two years ago, the best bang-per-buck was the Pentax K20D. I'm quite happy, and I'm sure I'll stay happy for a few more years.

So I urge you: think carefully about what entry-level means. IMHO too many beginner's dSLRs are substandard, produced to make customers WANT and NEED to buy something else, soon. These are NOT made to anywhere near the same standards as professional gear.

Also remember that a camera is a box upon which to hang lenses. Digital cameras are good for a few years. Good lenses can last many decades; I use some over a century old. Buying a camera means marrying-into a lens system, and divorce is expensive. More lenses are available for Pentax than for any other brand. Any Pentax-compatible lens EVER MADE will work on a Pentax dSLR, unlike other brands that have changed their lens mounts. Such lenses can also be adapted to Canon and Olympus dSLRs, and to some extent to Sony and Nikon too, but with limitations.

Keep in mind that Pentax, Sony, and Olympus (on some bodies), have in-body image stabilization / shake reduction. ANY lens put on these bodies can be stabilized, not just IS glass. And IS/SR *does* make a difference. I consider this a major down-check for Nikon and Canon.
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

So anyway, think about how much an entry-level system will cost in the long run. Think about what lenses you want, and what for. Take a look a used lens prices online. Think about IS/SR, and the cost of NOT having in-body IS. Think about whether your camera should feel solid or plasticky. Good luck!
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Old Aug 18, 2010, 10:27 PM   #20
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As I said, she is open for other options.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pebblezs View Post
Hi all,

Thank you for the feedback and suggestions.

Basically I would like to upgrade from Canon Powershot SD800 to a dslr. I use my camera mostly when I'm on vacation and celebrations with my friends. It would be preferable to be able to shoot pictures at night without those little white dots. I'm not a camera suave person and would like to capture the best quality photo with an easy to use dslr that's cost efficient. I'm leaning towards the Canon XSi but I like the smallness of the Olympus Pen 2.
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