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Old Jul 19, 2010, 7:14 PM   #111
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koolpc and eyewii-

Please keep in mind that video on a DSLR is very unlike video on a P+S camera. The Sony does have focus light the illuminate in the viewfinder properly. The only option available to you if you want to know where the Pentax KX is focusing, is to use center point focusing, and then re-frame your photo while holding the focus locked. The Sony A-450 is a physically larger camera. The Pentax Kx is smaller, about the size of the Olympus E-620. So if size is an issue, go with the Pentax Kx or an Olympus EPL-1.

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Old Jul 20, 2010, 4:04 PM   #112
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Tried the Pentax K-x and the Sony a450. Neither did well. Admittedly I was inside in big stores with artificial light and just used the automatic mode. None of them got good focus (always slightly off). Maybe the focus point was the problem because there were so many racks of cameras getting in the way. I just used it like a quick point and shoot as that is what I will be doing when I try to get shots of the kids, but my old casio exilim EX-Z1080 10.1 MP gets better pictures on enlarging them on the computer than either of the other 2. I was expecting a marked improvement and I mean MARKED, they should be far superior if logic were to be followed from both the DSLR's. The pics from the Fujifilm HS10 seemed to give similar, if not better pics from inside Jessops that I took a few weeks ago. I suppose if I used the camera and knew all its quirks to get the best out of it in good illuminated, uncrowded outside places the DSLR's will outperform, or I surely hope they would. I even examined them on a Mac screen at Currys. These screens are better than HDTV (apparently). What to do. It is a shame I can't borrow each of them for a week.
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Old Jul 20, 2010, 4:40 PM   #113
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in a clutter space, allot of AF points actually cause allot of miss focus. Also, the kit lenses are not really great for indoor shore lighting. To really tell how well the camera are, put the camera in Av, aperture mode. Select f3.5 and choose single AF point center is best, and shot a photo. Also with the pentax, shooting inside you may want to put it in vivid for picture style.
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Old Jul 20, 2010, 5:12 PM   #114
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Tried the A450 and didn't like the feel of it. It was bulky etc. Back to the drawing board!
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Old Jul 20, 2010, 5:16 PM   #115
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if you want compact, olympus e-620 or pentax k-x. E-620 has the better jpeg engine, just not as good as the pentax in low light. 1600iso is where you want to stop with the olympus.
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Old Jul 20, 2010, 5:27 PM   #116
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Handled the Pentax K-x today and felt like a nice, compact DSLR. Not sure about the non AF lights but felt like a nice camera.
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Old Jul 20, 2010, 5:29 PM   #117
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Have you shoot allot with AF points lighting up? If not, think it is something that can be easy to adapt to. I shoot canon my whole life, but shooting my brothers pentax, it really did not take me long to adjust. But I like picking my points. I get better control, and less miss focus then auto af points.
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Old Jul 20, 2010, 5:36 PM   #118
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eye will View Post
Tried the Pentax K-x and the Sony a450. Neither did well. Admittedly I was inside in big stores with artificial light and just used the automatic mode. None of them got good focus (always slightly off). Maybe the focus point was the problem because there were so many racks of cameras getting in the way. I just used it like a quick point and shoot as that is what I will be doing when I try to get shots of the kids, but my old casio exilim EX-Z1080 10.1 MP gets better pictures on enlarging them on the computer than either of the other 2. I was expecting a marked improvement and I mean MARKED, they should be far superior if logic were to be followed from both the DSLR's. The pics from the Fujifilm HS10 seemed to give similar, if not better pics from inside Jessops that I took a few weeks ago. I suppose if I used the camera and knew all its quirks to get the best out of it in good illuminated, uncrowded outside places the DSLR's will outperform, or I surely hope they would. I even examined them on a Mac screen at Currys. These screens are better than HDTV (apparently). What to do. It is a shame I can't borrow each of them for a week.
Also remember that a dslr do not process the photo as much as a point and shoot. If you want mark improvement without editing. You will need to look at an olympus. They process better then any other dslr. The best jpeg engine on the market.
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Old Jul 20, 2010, 5:44 PM   #119
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I would agree with Shoturtle-

The Olympus E-620 has an excellent .jpeg engine, and it does the best in-camera processing among all entry level DSLR cameras. I do not think that not having the focus point illuminate to tell you where the Pentax Kx focused will be a big deal. You can always re-set the focus to center point focus and focus on any desired point, and then re-frame.

The Sony A-450 is a very good, but much larger than the E-620 or the Kx models.

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Old Jul 20, 2010, 6:10 PM   #120
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eye will View Post
Tried the Pentax K-x and the Sony a450. Neither did well. Admittedly I was inside in big stores with artificial light and just used the automatic mode. None of them got good focus (always slightly off). Maybe the focus point was the problem because there were so many racks of cameras getting in the way. I just used it like a quick point and shoot as that is what I will be doing when I try to get shots of the kids...
You'll have a *much* shallower depth of field (how much of the image is in focus as you get further away from your focus point) with a dSLR for a given aperture and subject framing.

That can come in handy for isolating your subjects from distracting backgrounds (so that your subject is sharp, and the background is blurry), which is one of the advantages of a dSLR over a point and shoot type camera.

But, you can't just point the camera in any direction and expect the entire scene to be sharp that way with closer subjects in the frame, especially in lower light using an Auto mode (where the camera is probably using the widest available aperture to keep shutter speeds faster, which means a shallower depth of field).

Instead, you'll want to make sure you're focusing on your desired subject, or use something other than a wider aperture setting (smaller f/stop number) for more depth of field, provided lighting permits and/or you're using a flash.

Most of the time, a dSLR is going to lock on a closer subject using it's default focus modes (even if it's not in the center of the frame), unless you set it a different way (by either selecting the focus point yourself if it's not locking on your desired subject; or setting it to use the Center Focus Point, locking focus with a half press, then reframing as desired before pressing the shutter button the rest of the way down).

If you had "racks of cameras getting in the way", chances are, those camera locked focus on them using their default settings, making subjects further away blurrier.

See this page for more information on Depth of Field:

http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html
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