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Old Jul 18, 2010, 10:47 PM   #1
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Default Need to update old S5600

Hi,

First time poster, have been reading the forums over the last few days.

Anyway, I'm looking to update my old Fuji S5600, I'm interested in getting a little more serious about photography,but am not quite ready for a dSLR. Mainly because as a student and a Mum, I simply don't have the time to learn right now.

I did look at getting the HS10, but the weight has put me off a little. I tend to use my zoom quite a bit as I shoot anything from animals in trees to sunrises over distant hills. I don't do a lot of indoors photography unless it is of the kids or special occasions.

I have a price range of about $500-700au. What do others suggest for my needs and price range?

Thank you
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Old Jul 19, 2010, 9:55 AM   #2
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NicoleAu-

Welcome to the Forum. We're pleased that you dropped by.

I felt the same way about the Fuji HS-10 and ended up purchasing the Panasonic FZ-35. It is measurably smaller than the Canon SX-20 and the Fuji HS-10. The FZ-35 is also a very user friendly camera and was easy to learn. Take a look at the Photo of the Day today. It was taken with a FZ-35.

We have an active group of FZ 35 users here in our Panasonic P+S folder so you might want to drop by. There are lots of posted photos, and FZ-35 photo tips.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jul 19, 2010, 11:47 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NicoleAu View Post
Hi,

First time poster, have been reading the forums over the last few days.
Welcome to the forum.

Quote:
Anyway, I'm looking to update my old Fuji S5600, I'm interested in getting a little more serious about photography,but am not quite ready for a dSLR. Mainly because as a student and a Mum, I simply don't have the time to learn right now.
One year ago, I was in the same situation. I wanted to replace
my S5600 with something newer. The Fujifilm cameras that were
available at the time were not getting very good reviews. At that
time the Panasonic DMC-FZ28 was widely regarded as the
best bridge camera, so I decided to jump ship and buy the
Panasonic.

One year on, the DMC-FZ28 has been 100% reliable and I
would happily recommend the Panasonic to anyone who is
looking for a good bridge camera. The current equivalent model
is the DMC-FZ38 (FZ35 in USA). This model is due for replacement,
probably in the next couple of months. See the FZ35 review on Steve's.


I did look at getting the HS10, but the weight has put me off a little. I tend to use my zoom quite a bit as I shoot anything from animals in trees to sunrises over distant hills. I don't do a lot of indoors photography unless it is of the kids or special occasions.

The HS10 is the other obvious candidate. I have never used one, but
some of the comments on this forum gives me the impression that it
is not quite as newbie friendly as the Panasonic. This might not be a
problem for you because you have probably have a few years of
experience with the S5600 behind you.

Quote:
I have a price range of about $500-700au. What do others suggest for my needs and price range?
You can probably guess what my suggestion will be. That budget
brings you into entry-level DSLR territory. The learning curve is not
as steep as you think. Most DSLRs have automatic and semi-automatic
modes which makes them almost as easy to use as your old S5600.
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Old Jul 19, 2010, 6:21 PM   #4
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Thanks for your suggestions

I was actually thinking of maybe going an entry level dslr, when I heard that they do have some auto settings. It probably makes more sense in the long run to buy a dslr now, rather than buy another p&s and then fork out more money later.

I've been looking at both the Canon 1000D and the Pentax K-X, there doesn't seem to be very much difference in price at the moment. Do the auto settings still give decent pictures? I've been trying to get my heard around aperture and ISO and other scary technical terms, but it doesn't seem to be computing in this little brain of mine lol. I am doing a basic journalism course amongst my other courses and I have been reading Real World Digital Photography, which has helped a little.

Last edited by NicoleAu; Jul 19, 2010 at 6:49 PM.
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Old Jul 19, 2010, 6:53 PM   #5
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NicoleAu-

Yes, there are indeed entry level DSLR cameras out there that do have automatic modes. But just getting the DSLR properly set-up requires some degree of photographic knowledge. With a DSLR, sooner or later you are going to have to attain some real and measurable photographic skills to get the most out of that DSLR camera. It is a bit more complex that saying: well I will save money by not having to purchase two cameras. Well, that is correct, but it is only half of what is needed. The other half is some basic photographic knowledge and skills.

Therefore you have to decide if you can devote the time needed to gain that knowledge now or that it would be more convenient to do it at a later time. That is why I suggested the FZ-35. The FZ-35 allows an easy entry and a slow and more measured process that will have you attain the learning and experience that you will need to move up to a DSLR. I would really hesitate to see you move from pure beginner into a DSLR instantly.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jul 19, 2010, 8:05 PM   #6
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Hi Sarah,

I do get what you're saying there and yes I realise more comes into it than the budget. The thing that sways me towards getting into dslr more, is the improved image quality and the challenge of learning something new. I have really enjoyed using my old S5600, which was a great bridge camera. I like to think that I do have some photographic skills as I have been experimenting with dof and iso and recently brought a tripod to reduce my camera shake for night time photography. But I'm wondering how else does one learn, if not from trying? Anyway I will look into the fz35 and maybe even back into the HS10.
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Old Jul 19, 2010, 9:20 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NicoleAu View Post
I've been looking at both the Canon 1000D and the Pentax K-X, there doesn't seem to be very much difference in price at the moment.
There are a few good entry level DSLRs. The K-x is highly regarded
by many of the forum members. They aren't so popular with the
very conservative camera buyers here in Ireland. Almost everyone
buys a Canon or Nikon The 1000D is a decent camera, but
the 450D is a better camera if you can stretch the budget a
bit further.

Quote:
Do the auto settings still give decent pictures?
It varies a bit between different brands and models, but the
automatic modes generally give fairly good results.

Quote:
I've been trying to get my heard around aperture and ISO and other scary technical terms, but it doesn't seem to be computing in this little brain of mine lol. I am doing a basic journalism course amongst my other courses and I have been reading Real World Digital Photography, which has helped a little.
The biggest difference between your S5600 and a DSLR is the ability
of the DSLR to take shots with a narrow depth of field. This opens up
new creative options, but it can also be confusing for the new convert
from a P&S or bridge camera. Most cameras have a few dedicated
auto modes for portraits, landscape, sports/action, macro etc...
This will get you started, but I do agree with Sarah's comment,
you will need to learn your way around the DSLR to get the most
out of it.

Don't be too overwhelmed by all the technical jargon. ISO
is a standard measure of film sensitivity. This has carried
over to the digital camera world. Aperture is just the hole
that lets the light in. Most lenses have a variable aperture
size. You can learn about this stuff in your own time.
Two tins of peas on the kitchen table will tell you more
about aperture than a whole library full of books.
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