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Old Aug 8, 2010, 5:19 PM   #1
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Default Sony DSC V1

I purchased a Sony DSC V-1 about 7.5 years ago and have been astounded with the results I have gotten. I wanted to upgrade from the 5MP. Problem is that it seems that my little camera with the Carl Zeiss lens just blows everybody and everything else out of the water. Are there any point and shoot cameras available with Zeiss lenses (or something just as good)????? Money is not an issue, but I absolutely to not want to sacrifice a quality image just to have a new camera!!
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Old Aug 8, 2010, 7:23 PM   #2
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Some of the Sony models have Carl Zeiss branded lenses. But, I'm not so sure you'll find a similar point and shoot model that has image quality significantly better than you're getting with your DSC-V1, as that particular camera model does produce pretty decent images.

Also, keep in mind that higher resolution sensors of the same physical size (and most newer sensors in point and shoot models are even smaller than the one in your V1) tend to place more demands on the lens quality needed for best results (because of smaller photosites for each pixel).

Also, I don't think any of the current Sony point and shoot models have a hotshoe if you're using an external flash.

For the most part, we're seeing fewer and fewer "prosumer" camera models like your V1, unless you move into a dSLR (but, dSLR models are much less expensive now compared to a few years back).
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Old Aug 8, 2010, 7:32 PM   #3
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P.S.

If you look at our Sony reviews section, you'll see cameras sorted by newest first on the right:

http://www.steves-digicams.com/camera-reviews/sony/

Some of the smaller Sony models do have Carl Zeiss branded lenses. But, I wouldn't let lens branding alone influence your decision too much. Instead, check out image quality using samples in the conditions you plan on using a camera in more often.
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Old Aug 9, 2010, 10:17 AM   #4
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Sounds like maybe its time to step up to DSLR. This is probably a dumb question, but do any DSLR's have point and shoot capabilities?? Since money is not an issue, how does a Sony DSLR with a Zeiss zoom sound?? Obviously I'm pretty attached to the Sony/Zeiss combination. I like the 4X zoom on my DSC V-1 but wouldn't mind a little more flexibility. Anyone have any thoughts.
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Old Aug 9, 2010, 10:32 AM   #5
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Jim-

Welcome to the Forum. We're pleased that you dropped by.

A Sony Alpha DSLR or even one of the new Sony NEX camera would be a good choice. And yes, Carl Zeiss zoom lens are available in the two Sony lines. You might check the possibilities at www.sonystyle.com.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 9, 2010, 10:42 AM   #6
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How much do you want to spend? ;-)

You can get a Sony/CZ 16-80mm f/3.5-4.5 AF lens at a reasonable price (around $750 now). Here's an example:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc..._4_5_Carl.html

On a camera with an APS-C Size sensor (all Sony dSLR models except the A850 and A900 have APS-C size sensors), that would give you the same angle of view you'd have using a 24-120mm lens on a 35mm camera (multiply by 1.5x to see how angle of view compares).

Something like a Sony A500 or A550 with that lens would make a pretty good package, and these cameras are selling for pretty decent prices right this minute at some of the popular vendors (probably because Sony is going to release more dSLR models soon that include Video Recording, hence the recent price drops on them). For example, B&H has the A500 for a "cart price" of around $549 right now (body only, no lens).

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search...tialSearch=yes

The A550 is a higher:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...P_Digital.html

For higher ISO speed use, I'd stick with the A500 or A550 in the current Sony dSLR lineup. These models also have very good Live View. If you don't care much about higher ISO speed use, then the other Sony dSLR models may be worth a look (A230, A330, A380, A390, etc.).

With other Sony/Carl Zeiss lenses (16-35mm f/2.8, 24-70mm f/2.8, etc.), the prices will increase substantially (as the other Sony/CZ offerings will also work on cameras with 35mm film size sensors like the A850 and A900, whereas the 16-80mm is designed to work better on cameras with APS-C size sensors).

Note that Photokina (a huge photography trade show held once every two years) is next month. So, you can expect announcements about new models leading into it (probably this month and/or next month) if you're not in a big hurry (as Sony has already announced that they'll be releasing more new dSLR models this year). Chances are, you'll see some new lens announcements, too.

But, at current prices, the A500 is a pretty good deal if you don't care about video recording (as prices have dropped on the A5xx models recently), and we can only speculate as to how much the newer models will cost and when they'll be on store shelves after Sony announces them.
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Old Aug 9, 2010, 11:14 AM   #7
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P.S.

If you're on a tight budget, I wouldn't assume you need a Carl Zeiss branded lens for good quality, either. There are many lens options available for dSLR models now (from the camera manufacturers, as well as third party vendors like Sigma and Tamron). For someone just starting with a dSLR, the 18-55mm kit lenses are usually a good bet (giving you about the same angle of view you'd have using a 27-83mm lens on a 35mm camera), since they usually add very little cost to a dSLR camera kit. For example, you could get a Sony A500 including a lens for around $569 now (a really good deal for this class of camera):

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...0_12_3_MP.html

Then, after you've used a camera for a while, you'll have a better idea of what lens (or lenses) may serve your purposes better (balancing cost, focal range, size, weight, brightness, etc.), as there are many choices. Unlike non-dSLR camera models, you're not limited to just one lens with a dSLR, and you don't have to buy all of your lenses at the same time. ;-)
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Old Aug 9, 2010, 5:05 PM   #8
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Thanks, Jim and Sarah and to anyone else who might have replied to my post. I appreciate the feedback/advice. While my budget is very "flexible", I'm a big fan of the "biggest bang for the buck" philosophy. Is the Sony A-550 and the SAL 1680Z lens a good combination/value for the 14-1500 range??? I'm not overly committed to either Sony or Zeiss, but I certainly have had some spectacular results with my little DSC-V1. Any comparable (or better) combinations with Nikon or Cannon??? Well........maybe I am committed to Zeiss, due to the fact that I have friends with more expensive cameras (and probably more talent) who are not using Zeiss glass.....and my images seem to have more "life" and a "feel" that the others lack. All help is appreciated!!!!
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Old Aug 9, 2010, 6:30 PM   #9
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There are pros and cons to any of them. Sony also makes some higher end models (A850, A900) with full frame (35mm film size sensors). You'd need to move up to a different lens type with those (as the 16-80mm is designed for cameras with APS-C size sensors).

You'll find a wide variety of choices from other camera manufacturers, too.

I'd let members know more about what you want to shoot more often (and in what conditions) for better responses. But, if you've been reasonably happy with your V1 and don't have any special needs, I'd probably stick with one of the more basic kits to begin with, versus spending a lot of money on higher end gear, until you get a better feel for the pros and cons of a given kit after using it for a while. Again, the typical 18-55mm lenses bundled with cameras add very little cost to the kits.
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Old Aug 12, 2010, 3:45 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim V View Post
Sounds like maybe its time to step up to DSLR. This is probably a dumb question, but do any DSLR's have point and shoot capabilities??
Yes, most dSLRs have a P&S mode. Set it on P, mount an AF lens, and GO!

I've been shooting for about 55 years; first went digital about a decade ago. I'm on my third DSC-V1 (I wore out the first two) and it's nearly always in my pocket, still my all-time favorite. But a couple years ago I inherited enough to buy a dSLR system (Thanks for dying, Mom!) and I asked myself: What do I want to do that I can't do with the V1?

The answers were: ultrawide, ultralong, and low light. I applied my systems-analyst training, did copious research, tallied user complaints, worked spreadsheets and charts etc. I leaned towards Sony or Olympus. But my first priority was ultrawide/fisheye, and good lenses from Canon and Nikon cost way too much, and Oly's sensor was too small, and fisheye zooms didn't exist for Sony then. Cold logic led me unexpectedly to Pentax: the K20D 14.6mpx dSLR, the DA10-17 fisheye, the DA18-250 superzoom, and the FA50/1.4 Nifty Fifty. Dozens of other lenses later, those are still my most-used glass.

Pentax and Sony still have a monopoly on in-body image stabilization. Sony makes great sensors (and the Pentax Kx uses one) but I've read of quality issues... and some people just hate the ergonomics, the menu systems, etc. I don't know enough about the Sony dSLRs to criticize them; I just read the reports saying the Kx is tops for IQ and feel. And Pentax has WR (weather resistant) lenses to put on its rugged frames.

Of course, there's a huge inventory of vintage Pentax lenses; and yes, all Pentax-compatible lenses can be mounted on Sony dSLRs, although with manual operation. My attitude is, there's no conflict between using the V1 *AND* my K20D. In my carry sack (a large Ameribag) I'll typically schlep:

* Sony DSC-P20 and -V1 P&S's, and IR light and filters for the V1.
* Canon SS80u 135 P&S, for those times when only film will do it.
* Pentax K20D with lenses:
--- DA10-17 or Zenitar 16/2.8 fisheye
--- DA18-250 superzoom for walkaround utility
--- Macro-Takumar 50/4 for macros and ultrasharp shots
--- FA50/1.4 and Nikkor 85/2 for low-light and portraits
--- the day's Zeiss, Tokina, Meyer, or Russian glass
--- Sakar 500/8 mirror for long reach
* And an Ikonta 6x6 or Kodak 6x9 folder, when only BIG film will do.

When I'm feeling really pervy, I may toss in the hefty Schneider Betavaron fixed-focus enlarger zoom lens on 30mm of extension tubes, for a really weird shooting experience. More on that another time. Anyway, consider Pentax.
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Last edited by RioRico; Aug 12, 2010 at 4:10 PM.
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