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Old Oct 9, 2010, 12:34 PM   #1
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Default Nikon D5000 or D90? Lenses?

Okay, so after ranting about Nikon, I've actually decided my new SLR is going to be either the D5000 or the D90. I'm leaning toward the D5000 because of the tiltable LCD and cheaper price. I want to buy just the body though, and get the lenses separately. I mainly shoot horses, landscapes, and macro. I typically shoot between 5mm and 120mm. What brand of lens would be best for the D5000? The kit lens doesn't seem like it's going to cut it for me, but I dunno for sure.

I also don't understand, on my Kodak, it says 28-624mm equivalent--yet when I take certain photos and look at the metadata, I've gotten 10, even 5mm shots (without being in macro mode). How do I know then what type of lens I should buy?

I was hoping to get make an 18-55 and then a 55-200mm, but I'm also not sure how to tell if a lens is going to fit the D5000 body. What sort of mount should I be looking for? Also, excuse me if my terminology is off--this is my first SLR, after all. Any help is appreciated. Thanks!

Also, I'm looking to spend a max of $900 for everything, I found the body for $549, and cheaper is always better!
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 12:49 PM   #2
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You should be able to get a D5000, 18-55 VR, 55-200 VR kit for under $900.

Kits usually save money. Make sure you buy from a reputable dealer, you will regret it if you don't.
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 1:13 PM   #3
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Make sure the dealer is on this list if you actually want to get service on the camera if anything goes wrong.

http://www.nikonusa.com/fileuploads/...uthDealers.pdf

Usually, when you see lower prices on Nikon gear, it's gray market (not intended for sale in the country you live in). Nikon USA will not service gray market gear, even if you are willing to pay them for the service.

You'll also tend to have other issues with many online dealers like trying to charge extra for accessories that come with the camera (batteries, etc.), usually at very inflated prices. Ditto for things like shipping costs, insurance costs (sometimes unauthorized) and more. If you refuse to buy the extras, your order will often go to backorder status (even if the site shows the item in stock). They're not going to sell the cameras at a loss. ;-)

Always check any vendor you consider using http://www.resellerratings.com

If they're not listed, I'd avoid them. If they have a small number of customer reviews, I'd avoid them (as vendors will often try to "pad" their own ratings with glowing reviews). There are many scammers around with nice looking web sites using bait and switch tactics. Many of them are in the Brooklyn area (where they seem to be able to get away with it), and startup new web sites using different names on a regular basis. Do yourself a favor and stick with a reputable dealer.

Here are a couple:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com

http://www.adorama.com

The reason you're seeing odd focal lengths reported in the EXIF is because the actual focal range of the lens on your Kodak is probably very short. Chances are, it's probably something like 4.6-110mm. Because of it's very tiny sensor, it just gives you the same angle of view you'd have using a 28-624mm lens on a 35mm camera. Most point and shoot models advertise the "35mm equivalent" focal length, versus their actual focal length. Some EXIF readers will give you both the actual focal length and the "35mm equivalent" focal length.

With a dSLR, you're looking at the actual focal length when buying a lens. But, because the models you're looking at use APS-C size sensors (that are smaller than 35mm film), you'll have a narrower angle of view compared to the same focal length lenses on a 35mm camera. If you want to see the 35mm equivalent for them, just multiply the focal lengths by 1.5x. For example, a 100mm lens on a Nikon D5000 would give you the same angle of view you'd have using a 150mm lens on a 35mm camera (100mm x 1.5 = 150mm). An 18-55mm kit lens would give you the about same angle of view you'd have using a 27-83mm lens on a 35mm camera.
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 1:21 PM   #4
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P.S.

You'll want to buy F mount lenses that are specifically made for Nikon models. You'll see that in their listings (for Nikon) if it's lens mount is designed to fit on a Nikon dSLR.

With the D5000, you'll also need lenses with built in focus motors if you want Autofocus. In the Nikon lineup, that means sticking with AF-S (Silent Wave Motor) lenses. In the Sigma lineup, you'll want to stick with HSM (Hypersonic Motor Focusing) lenses. With Tamron, you'll need to make sure the lens listing specifically says "built in motor" for Autofocus with a D5000. That's because the D5000 camera body does not have it's own focus motor built in. So, you'll need to use lenses with built in focus motors with that camera if you want Autofocus.

With the D90, you can use either lens type (with or without a built in motor). But, with bodies below the D90 (like the D3000 and D5000), you'll need lenses with built in motors to get Autofocus.
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 1:49 PM   #5
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I second the recommendation for what you are looking for. I have both bodies but the AF-S lenses are a must for the D5000 if you want autofocus. The kit lens along with the 55-200mm VR will cover most of what you would want.
Flash would be a SB600 and a 35mm 1.8 AF-S would round things out nicely.

I would go with a bundle if you can with the body and two lenses to start.

I have the D90 since I have older lenses that are not AF-S (no built-in motor).
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 4:19 PM   #6
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If I were to start over again, which I might have to, the lowest Nikon I'd consider is the d90. The whole point of a dslr is lenses. I'd sure rather be able to use all of the lenses they make/made than a subset of more expensive ones.
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 4:24 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cinderhawkcreative View Post
... I mainly shoot horses, landscapes, and macro. ...
Neither of the kit lenses you're looking at will do macro work, btw

Quote:
Originally Posted by cinderhawkcreative View Post
I also don't understand, on my Kodak, it says 28-624mm equivalent--yet when I take certain photos and look at the metadata, I've gotten 10, even 5mm shots (without being in macro mode). How do I know then what type of lens I should buy?
That "28-624mm" is the 35mm equivalent focal length, but the "10, even 5mm" is the actual focal length. If, when you scroll down through the EXIF data a little further, you'll see the 35mm focal length. The 35mm equivalent focal length is necessary becasue differnet cameras have different size image sensors, and so have different angles of view when using the same focal length lens. But when you're looking at the 35mm equivalent focal length of the photos from your Koday, your still not done, because the Nikon dSLRs you're talking about have image sensors that are smaller than a 35mm film exposure (albeit not a small as teh one in your Kodak) so you still need to do some conversion. For instance, if the 35mm equivalent focal length used to get a shot that you like, was 300mm, you'd need a 200mm lens to do the same thing on a D90 or D5000.
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 7:28 PM   #8
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Thank you guys for all your help--I think I'm finally starting to understand some of this now lol! I did find a Nikon D5000 with the 18-55mm lens, as well as a 2x telephoto lens and a wide angle lens, tripod, battery, mini-tripod, battery charger, 8GB card, camera bag, UV filter, lens cap holder, lens cleaning kit, external flash, and an LCD screen protector for $700--the only catch being that the camera is manufacturer refurbished. It has a 90 day warranty from both the seller and Nikon--has anyone ever bought refurbished before? Is it too big of a risk? I am thinking maybe there's an extended warranty I could buy too. In general, are Nikon kit lenses good, or should I buy the body and a better lens such as something from Sigma or Tamron as someone mentioned above? I also found a D5000 body plus the 18-55 and a 55-200mm, all new, for $800. What do you guys think?
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 7:49 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frank-in-toronto View Post
If I were to start over again, which I might have to, the lowest Nikon I'd consider is the d90. The whole point of a dslr is lenses. I'd sure rather be able to use all of the lenses they make/made than a subset of more expensive ones.
Not really a true statement anymore. Yes there are some expensive, pro level AF-S lenses, but all current kit lenses (the 18-55 and 55-200 vr), and the 18-105vr, the 35 f1.8 are among some of the many, inexpensive lenses available. Most of the real cheap, older lenses are of poor quality and are of odd focal lengths for APS-C DSLR's and not worth using even if they were free. AF-S doesn't necessarily make the lens more expensive.
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 7:58 PM   #10
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I think the first deal you described is a scam, and if it's not, it's a good camera with a lot of junk thrown in.

Make sure that, in the second deal, the lenses are the VR versions of the lens. Many retailers are putting together packages with the older non-VR versions of the lenses.
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