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Old Oct 9, 2010, 9:00 PM   #11
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the FZ uses the same size sensor as most of the point and shoot cameras out there. A tiny 1/2.23 size. So the difference form one to another is really not great, as the amount of light they came capture is limited. Most of the difference is processing the camera does.

So yes I have a old canon A460 point and shoot, that in good lighting shoots as well as my newer point and shoots with the same size sensors. And about the same in low light.

To really move up in image quality you need to move to a larger sensor, the cameras I mention have 1/1.63 sensors. So in low light you can shoot at higher iso, with good point and shoot results at 800 to 1600iso.

And M4/3 is 4 times as large of a sensor, so if you shoot at the same 800-1600iso, the results are just way better. Bigger sensor equals better image quality. Especially in low light.

Higher iso is needed for shooting indoors and low light if you do not want to use a flash. That is one of 2 things you can do to get the shot.
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 9:07 PM   #12
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Kim, there are probably going to be a few people that yell at me for saying this, but *whispers* I don't use my FZ35's flash a lot either indoors or at night.

Here are two I shot at night with the FZ35, and I didn't even tweak them in PP (post-production).


(That said, I have a friend who has a Canon G11 - one of the other cameras I think shoturtle mentioned -- and that does very nice lowlight photography; she shoots with it at concerts -- indoors *and* in the dark -- and enjoys it a lot. )
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 9:10 PM   #13
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Actually that's a good idea Roooby, here's 1 of my flash shots.. The background stays dark so not too strong but the foreground manages to stand out which is what I wanted.

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Old Oct 9, 2010, 9:14 PM   #14
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Shoturtle thanks again for all the info! That makes a lot of sense and is quite helpful.

Jyaku, nice pictures! Thanks for the info too! I like the idea of learning and gradually making my way up to a DSLR.

Roooby, thanks for the reply! That's good to know about the low light situations. Do most people consider daytime indoors to be a low-light situations? I would rarely shoot at nighttime. Love the pictures you posted!
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 9:23 PM   #15
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Kim.. there's 1 thing that's very underrated and should be considered almost in the manner of going from landline to cellphones that's in camera video ability. I was pleasantly surpised by both pictures and videos of the FZ35 initially. Here they are for you to see:

Video in day and night ambient lighting: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NdPxte-p6J4

And ofcourse here are Images in low light: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hA3U4CDTQFw

Makes you feel you were there.
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 9:23 PM   #16
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When shooting a lower iso of back lite objects like the fountain shot Roooby linked, most point and shoots can do that. It is when you shoot a person indoor where there is not spot lighting and the subject is not translucent that the FZ will not produce great results when you need to go to a higher iso pass 800.

Rooobys shots can be accomplished by any point and shoot as there is ample lighting. Back light fountain and stadium lighting with a longer shutter speed.

These were taken with my olympus stylus, very bad low light camera. But had decent results because of the lighting conditions.
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 9:31 PM   #17
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Great shots shoturtle. Where is that place in the 1st pic?
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 9:35 PM   #18
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when someone mentions compact camera, and they want one that performs inside both with and without flash, it can only lead to 1 conclusion. and that is the compacts with the larger 1/1.7" sensors.

these are the cameras mentioned by Sarah and Shoturtle. The Canon s90/s95, Canon G11/G12, Nikon P7000, Samsung EX1, and Panasonic LX3/LX5.

these are the best pool of cameras to pick from for the goals of good indoor shots both with and without flash, and not needing a large zoom. each camera has its advantages and disadvantages over 1 another, but all will perform as well indoors as you can ask of a compact.

if small size is priority, the S90/S95 is the easy choice, as being the most pocketable. slightly larger than that sits the LX3/LX5, here the LX5 is the easy choice as it offers a better zoom over the LX3 and enough to make it worth it. Similar size is the Samsung EX1 which boasts a really fast lens, but not quite as refined of package though it is a bit cheaper than the Canon and Panny with its new rebates. If you move up to the G11/G12 and P7000 you gain full ttl flash capabilities and more manual controls and dedicated switches but you do this at the expense of considerable size and weight.
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Old Oct 9, 2010, 9:35 PM   #19
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Both in Bangkok, but they are poor compare to what my m4/3 or dslr can do with the wrong lens on.
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Old Oct 10, 2010, 9:25 AM   #20
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Thanks, Dustin for clearing the air.

For Kim to really see any noticeable improvement in her photos it will take a compact camera (S-90,S-95, LX-3,LX-5, G-11, G-12, P-7000, or the EX-1).

The plus with one of those cameras is that they can also handle higher ISO settings with ease, better image quality, and less noise. Another bonus is that some of those cameras have a dedicated hot shoe (G-11,G-12, P7000, LX-3, LX-5, and EX-1) which allows for an accessory external flash. An external flash, used properly will easily eliminate most common flash complaints that we see with P+S cameras using their built-in flash units. For example take a look at the attached link below:

http://anchorse.smugmug.com/Other/Pe...3_3jFED-X3.jpg

An external flash also allows flash bounce lighting that looks very attractive as well, as seen in this link:

http://anchorse.smugmug.com/Other/So...6_nox3e-X3.jpg

So the real issue is learning to use flash effectively.

Sarah Joyce
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