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Old Oct 21, 2010, 10:44 PM   #151
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no such filter, you will give up image quality with any filter, the higher price filters degrade less.

If you must get a BW MRC or Hoya pro1 HMC, Tiffen HT, these are the best on the market.
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Old Oct 22, 2010, 6:18 AM   #152
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Looking at the design of the lens, I wouldn't really worry about a filter.

The front element is fairly recessed, in fact I wouldn't even bother with a lens hood.

As to shooting into the sun, well don't do it if you can avoid it. If you are in live view mode then the sensor can get fried. If you are looking through the viewfinder you will destroy your retinas before you damage the camera.

Just use common sense, treat the sensor the way you would your eyes. A little bit here or there is fine, but not prolonged "staring".
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Old Oct 22, 2010, 8:47 AM   #153
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peripatetic View Post
..The front element is fairly recessed...
That's the nice thing about primes. That is one of the reasons I don't use filters on them. The other is that I am trying to get ultimate quality with it (which is why most people use them) and so I don't want ANYTHING in the way.
However, it's not like my 18-70mm kit lens is particulary good, and the lens cap falls of pretty easily for some reason, so a UV filter is sort of necessary protection (especially since that is my beat-up lens)
So I wouldn't use a filter for all situations, since it can degrade image quality (especially ghosting) on occasion. So don't use one for a wedding. But if it's just trees I haven't found too much difference.
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Old Oct 22, 2010, 9:52 AM   #154
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How do you go about cleaning lens from dust? Microfiber cloth wipes or that rocket blaster or maybe the pen brush?

Please advise.
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Old Oct 22, 2010, 10:54 AM   #155
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that is all you will need.
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Old Oct 22, 2010, 11:07 AM   #156
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I need all of them?
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Old Oct 22, 2010, 11:21 AM   #157
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the cloth for regular use, the blower is good for quick cleaning of the sensor and lens. As I usually blow off the dust and dirt first, then wipe with the cloth, and blow it again.

The lens pens is the stubborn dirt that is stuck on ht lens. I have all of them.
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Old Oct 22, 2010, 11:21 AM   #158
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Generally dust on the lens doesn't affect your images. A microfibre cloth is fine if there is no grit, as is a t-shirt. :-)

Otherwise wipe gently with a damp cloth or blow off the grit.

If you are likely to go into very hostile conditions - sea-spray or very dry and dusty deserts then consider a Uv filter. In general though in normal conditions you shouldn't need a filter.
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Old Oct 30, 2010, 11:59 PM   #159
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Well its finally here!

First few shots of people in fine jpeg, produced very nice results but a little CA maybe from a shining bulb. I will have to avoid that.

In the mean time could I have some suggestions for maybe a walk-around lens that I could put a polarizing filter on or the 35mm would do nicely for landscapes with a polarizing filter as well?

Oh does anyone know a good bag for nikon dslr's that is not too expensive and preferably something small that could fit inside a backpack?
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Old Oct 31, 2010, 10:31 AM   #160
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Interesting thread, the D90 seems like a very good choice, though a bit pricey.

I was going to recommend thinking outside the box a little with the Olympus e-p1 and the fixed 17mm 2.8 lens. Similar performance in a more compact package at half the price, but with the same flexibility of interchangeable lens options and possibility to move up to a larger heavy duty professional weather proof camera body like the E3 or E5 later down the road.
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