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Old Oct 15, 2010, 3:17 PM   #1
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Default New to dsrl world, not a club about lenses, looking foro longish zoom

Hi, I am new to this, and being doing some research but am completely lost so will greatly appreciate your suggestions. First of all I have two kids, 5, 7. So i want a fast camera with good picture quality preferably, one i could just print withouth too much editing ( or not at all). aAt some ot my kids events i have to shoot from a distance and want to be able to see their faces, zoom is important and HD movie. And as i say fast, i want to capture what i am seeing an not what will happen later as with my point and shoot.
I have no idea about the lenses and what their numers stand for, so i can't figure out which will give me the distance i need.
I want to keep it low round 700-800 for body and lens, but could go a lintel higher if it was what i had to get what i need.

Last edited by marubex; Oct 15, 2010 at 11:14 PM.
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Old Oct 15, 2010, 3:47 PM   #2
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What events do your kids participate in?

Keep in mind that recording video with a dSLR is much more complex that using a camcorder or even a P&S, so if that's a priority, you may want to stick with P&S digicams.
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Old Oct 15, 2010, 4:45 PM   #3
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Thank you, but no my priority is taking pictures, but the video capacity will be a great bonus, we prefer to carry just one thing. They participare in school events such as plays as Well as horseback riding and some sports.
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Old Oct 15, 2010, 5:02 PM   #4
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Everyone has a different idea of quality. In general, sports shooting is some of the most difficult. It is absolutely NOT a point and shoot style of photography - and it's extremely challenging to get the photos high quality without the need to post process. Additionally, you'll quickly find that what you think is a lot of zoom, really isn't when it comes to sports.

Slightly less challenging are the school plays. But, it's still a challenge. You're going to want a lens that is more capable of shooting in low light than the majority of consumer grade (i.e. inexpensive) lenses. Especially if you're more than 15-20 feet from the subject. That starts to get fairly pricey. It can be done, to be sure. But it's a challenge.
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Old Oct 15, 2010, 5:16 PM   #5
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I would suggest considering a superzoom bridge camera instead of a dslr so you could get a no hassle camera, just point and shoot and get great snaps.

You can easily get a FZ-35 which does all you want it to do and is a great camera at a bargain price for under $300 now on amazon, or a FZ-40, FZ-100 or SX-30.

My personal favorite is the FZ-35. You can find good deals on open box/ used cameras too and pocket $400 for something else.

Just look at our Panasonic Lumix section to see the pictures - it seems to be a favorite zoom with video record capability camera around here.

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Old Oct 15, 2010, 6:04 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jyaku View Post
I would suggest considering a superzoom bridge camera instead of a dslr so you could get a no hassle camera, just point and shoot and get great snaps.

You can easily get a FZ-35 which does all you want it to do and is a great camera.
I'm sure it would help the OP to see your shots from the FZ-35 of school plays and sporting events - so they can see exactly how the camera performs in those areas since that's what the OP is buying for.
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Old Oct 15, 2010, 6:08 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jyaku View Post
Just look at our Panasonic Lumix section to see the pictures ...
I looked and couldn't find any shots of baseball or soccer, or even plays or recitals. Perhaps you could point them out to me.

Oops! JohnG beat me to it.
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Old Oct 15, 2010, 8:55 PM   #8
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not sure the fz-35 would be the best for things like plays because of the lower light. has anyone here used the fz-35 to shoot any indoor stuff like that where the people are indoors at a distance and moving?
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Old Oct 15, 2010, 11:16 PM   #9
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Thank you all. One thing that concerns me about lona zoom cameras is that i've been told they are slow. I want to be as clones as i can be to my old 35mm where you pressed the button and it captures what was happening.
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Old Oct 15, 2010, 11:31 PM   #10
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Can you use a flash at school plays. If so with a dslr, a good external flash will help out. With the long zoom, when most people say the are slow, it is not the auto focus speed, or shutter lags that pns have. Rather they are referring to aperture size. When shooting a zoom the are dark lenses. So they do not let in as much light as lenses with bigger aperture. The smaller the number after the range, the bigger the aperture. So the larger the aperture, the better it can shoot in low light. So most long zooms that are consumer grade are design to shoot outdoor with good lighting.

If you want a zoom that can preform indoors, they get really expensive with big apertures. You are look at least 700 dollars with a f2.8 aperture.
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