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Old Nov 22, 2010, 1:03 AM   #1
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Default Need Help With New DSLR

Whats going on Photography Experts

I'm looking to buy a new DSLR and was wondering if you guys could point me in the right direction

Budget 800-1000 bucks
Primary use: Action/Sports
Secondary Use: Nature, Landscape etc.
Video Recording: Will be put into use but its not a HUGE Factor
Photos will be taken both indoors and outdoors. (Track and Field, Soccer, Tennis, Football, Baseball, and Basketball)

I noticed the Canon T2i, Nikon D5000 were in the price Range. I'm willing to spend a little extra though if you guys have better suggestions. I was helping out our school photographer with all NCAA Sports at my college using a Nikon D70. Students no longer have access to the Cameras any more so I have to buy my own : /. I'm trying to find a good Camera for a reasonable price that suits my needs. Thanks!
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Old Nov 22, 2010, 3:23 AM   #2
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Hi there,May I suggest the Pentax K-r($900 with the 18-55 and 55-300 kit) or the K-x? Canon t2i is an xcellent choice but U do look up these 2 since k-r is faster and a bit newer.K-x is prob the best entry level DSLR( $650 with the kit lenses 18-55,55-300)
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Old Nov 22, 2010, 3:38 AM   #3
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is the basketball indoors or outdoors. The football and baseball day or night games.

With what you want to shoot, I would not get any of the camera in kit form. You pick a very very expensive type of photography.

It the baseball and football and other sports are day event, be the canon T1i with the canon ef 70-300mm IS USM about 500 dollar This lens will focus faster then any kit lens and give you 1/2 the field of play covered.

If the basketball is indoors. You can get the canon ef 85 1.8 USM about 360 dollars or ef 100 f2 USM around 360 dollars. Though these lenses do not have IS, it is not really something you want to use when shooting sports. So it is not a big deal;

Now if you want a zoom for the indoor stuff you can look at the sigma 50-150 2.8 HSM about 700 dollars, or the sigma 70-200 2.8 HSM for about 800 dollars. These lenses do not have IS, but will give you zoom ability indoors. But there are better the canon ef 70-200 2.8L about 1400 for the now IS and 1700-2500 for depending on which model of the IS lens. If you opt for the canon option, you can skip the ef 70-300 IS USM if you get a TC the EF 1.4 for about 300 dollar, with it you will have close to the reach of the 70-300mm.

Between all the brands with the entry level dslr. The canon is the best option for sports.

If you are seriously looking to get into sports photography, I would PM JohnG or Mark1616. They can give you the best info for in this area.
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Old Nov 22, 2010, 6:21 AM   #4
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Only Canon and Nikon have lenses that are appropriate for shooting indoor sports/action, and entry-level Canons have better AF systems than entry-level Nikons. Plus, the Nikon lens that's appropriate for indoor sports/action won't AF on entry-level Nikons.

I suggest you get the Canon T1i instead of the T2i, and spend the money on lenses. To stay within your budget, get the kit lens (for general purpose shooting), the 85/1.8 (for indoor sports/action), and the Tamron 70-300 Di LD (for outdoor sports/action.) You could go with Canon's 55-250 instead, but it or the Tamron should be the first lens you upgrade, so the less you spend on it, the sooner you can replace it.
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Old Nov 22, 2010, 8:38 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TCav View Post
Only Canon and Nikon have lenses that are appropriate for shooting indoor sports/action,
TCav. Could you go into detail on this please?

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Old Nov 22, 2010, 9:17 AM   #6
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Quote:
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TCav View Post
Only Canon and Nikon have lenses that are appropriate for shooting indoor sports/action, ...
Could you go into detail on this please?
To get fast shutter speeds (to avoid motion blur due to subject movement) without using high ISO settings (to avoid excessive image noise) where you can't use flash, you need large apertures. Nikon has an 85mm f/1.8, and Canon has an 85mm f/1.8 and a 100mm f/2.0, all of which are reasonably priced, and within ToliverX's budget. A lens with a maximum aperture of f/2.8, like the zoom lenses that shoturtle mentioned, will require slower shutter speeds or higher ISOs, and they cost a lot more, so they're outside ToliverX's budget. True, noise reduction settings or applications can reduce the image noise, but they'll also reduce the detail and therefore the image quality. A larger aperture lens is the best solution, and only Canon and Nikon have lenses that are appropriate for what ToliverX wants to shoot.

Sigma has an 85mm f/1.4 that should be good for indoor sports/action, but it is also more expensive than ToliverX's budget could tolerate.
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Old Nov 22, 2010, 9:37 AM   #7
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Thanks to better sensors, it is no longer necessary to shoot indoor sports with prime lenses. But it really varies by body and your personal tolerance for noise. The OP mentioned basketball. Assuming available light (and not strobes/flash), I've found in the dozen or so gyms I've shot in at HS level and below that f2.8 1/400 and ISO 3200 is an average setting - some gyms brighter and some dimmer.

But, we need a bit more information on the specifics of the sports in question. For each sport, list the following:
  • Level of play
  • Indoors vs. Outdoors daylight vs. Outdoors night
  • where will you be shooting from
  • what is your expectation of quality (share on computer, print 4x6, print 8x10, sell to paper, sell to other parents)?
Sports shooting is one of the most demanding types of photography equipment wise. There are a lot of aspects to it - not only do you need the proper camera, but you need the proper lens (and that's unlikely to be the same lens for every sport you have listed), you also need access to shoot from proper locations and you need to learn the skill set - sports shooting is not a point and shoot type of photography. People that buy DSLRs with kit lenses and have expectations of quality sports photos are usually disappointed with the results. But given the answers to the above questions, we can better direct you towards what equipment you'll need. You might not be able to afford everything you need right away but at least you'll know what's required before you spend your money.
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Old Nov 22, 2010, 10:31 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnG View Post
Thanks to better sensors, it is no longer necessary to shoot indoor sports with prime lenses. But it really varies by body and your personal tolerance for noise. The OP mentioned basketball. Assuming available light (and not strobes/flash), I've found in the dozen or so gyms I've shot in at HS level and below that f2.8 1/400 and ISO 3200 is an average setting - some gyms brighter and some dimmer. ...
But a fast prime would always do as well, possibly better, and it would fit within ToliverX's budget. So presuming adequate conditions, a fast prime would let him hit the ground running.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnG View Post
But, we need a bit more information on the specifics of the sports in question. ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by ToliverX View Post
... I was helping out our school photographer with all NCAA Sports at my college ...
My guess would be that lighting conditions would be better than average.
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Old Nov 22, 2010, 10:49 AM   #9
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But a fast prime would always do as well, possibly better,
In real world sports shooting everything is a trade-off. Shooting basketball with a prime lens is extremely restrictive. 50mm lenses are too short to get quality focus past 15 feet or so and 85mm lenses on aps-c sensor cameras are very tight and still don't get you as much reach as you would like. Given the choice of shooting basketball with my 85mm 1.8 or my 70-200 2.8 I choose the 70-200 everytime because it's a more flexible tool if you have ISO performance up to the task.

Thanks for pointing out the OP is shooting college - I missed that. That's going to make using an 85 even tougher on an APS-C because of the height of the players. Outdoor is going to be a bit of a challenge. It's going to be difficult to do soccer without at least a 300mm lens. And even though I'm guessing this isn't a major Div 1 school they're still lilely to enforce shooting restrictions on where photographers can be.

The bottom line - with a budget of $800-1000, the OP isn't going to shoot all those sports at the college level and get quality results.
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Old Nov 22, 2010, 11:38 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnG View Post
... The bottom line - with a budget of $800-1000, the OP isn't going to shoot all those sports at the college level and get quality results.
So, considering the OP's budget, where would you recommend he start?
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