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Old Nov 23, 2010, 11:58 PM   #1
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Default dSLR choices from Nikon, Sony and Canon

I'm looking for a dSLR camera at the moment and I'm kinda stuck between what I should buy. I'm a beginner and I'm moving up from a Fuji S7000 bridge camera. The main purpose of the camera is to take pictures of my cars, friends at parties or get-togethers and also some landscapes in society.

What I want the most is that depth of field feature which only SLRs have where I can blur out the background or to focus on certain objects. I also like natural lighting from bounce flashes (Which I currently have for the S7000).

My budget is preferably $550 Australian dollars and backwards. I can stretch it just a bit if I need to, but obviously not too much.
So my choices have narrowed down to three brands which are Sony, Canon and Nikon.

The models from Sony which fit in my budget range is the A330 and the A290, From Nikon the D3000 and from Canon the EOS 1000D.
The Sony A290 and Nikon D3000 has no live view feature. The others have that feature. I'm not sure if I need this feature, but a lot of cameras have it these days.

So out these cameras, which one would be the best buy for me?

Thanks.
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Old Nov 24, 2010, 12:07 AM   #2
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They are all about the same, but with tight budget I would go with the canon. You will need a big aperture lens with and you can get the canon ef 50 1.8 for about 95 US dollars. Sony has a 50 1.8 for about 110 US dollars. Nikon has a 35mm 1.8 at 190 US dollars.

But with the canon you get a bit more feature. If you could I would move up to a canon 450D over the 1000D. The 450D has a much better sensor.
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Old Nov 24, 2010, 3:21 AM   #3
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Sony has a 35/1.8 for $175, a 50/1.8 for $125, and an 85/2.8 for $225.

Plus, they'll all be stabilized on a Sony body. The equivalent Canon lenses won't be.
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Old Nov 24, 2010, 3:31 AM   #4
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I would go with the cmos over the cdd sensor with the sony. Cmos on the canon seems to retain better detail and have better noise control at 1600iso. The A330 has a tiny view area. The A290 is just a revamped A230.

IS is over rated allot, nice to have. But not needed as much as people think. You can compare photos sample at this link, just pick the 2 cameras you want to compare.

http://www.imaging-resource.com/IMCOMP/COMPS01.HTM
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Old Nov 24, 2010, 4:32 AM   #5
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The Sony A230 used a 10MP sensor, while the A290 uses a 14MP sensor. And there are still some bargains to be had on the 12MP CMOS A500, though I can't confirm that in Australia.

If you've got IS and don't need it, you can turn it off. If you need it and don't have it, you can't turn it on.

And Sony currently has the best collection of inexpensive large aperture lenses available, for a shallow depth of field.
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Old Nov 24, 2010, 5:16 AM   #6
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If I'm using the standard 18-55mm lens in each of these cameras, will I be able to achieve depth of field still?
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Old Nov 24, 2010, 5:36 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stevo1210 View Post
If I'm using the standard 18-55mm lens in each of these cameras, will I be able to achieve depth of field still?
Actually, You will not get something like on Prime Lenses like 50.8
but it is still acceptable. still get nice out-of-focus elements.
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Old Nov 24, 2010, 5:38 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stevo1210 View Post
If I'm using the standard 18-55mm lens in each of these cameras, will I be able to achieve depth of field still?
You can manipulate both the subject distance and the distance to the background to get the out-of-focus background, but it's a lot easier with a larger aperture than you'd typically get with a kit lens.
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Old Nov 24, 2010, 9:38 AM   #9
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there's a sale at the local camera store for the Nikon D3000. It comes with a 18-55mm VR lens in the kit and also comes with a camera bag and 4GB SD card for the price of $539. I like the price as it suits me perfectly. I held the camera in my hands and the build quality surpassed that of the Sony and Canon units, the only downside is no live view. Would this be a good buy for my needs?
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Old Nov 24, 2010, 10:33 AM   #10
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The biggest problem with no Live View is if you are interested in macro photography. Live View is the most reliable way to manually focus a macro shot, where the question of what is in focus is a persistent one. The easiest way to accomplish what you want is to zoom the live view as far as you can and optimize the focus on the point of interest. I don't know whether the D3000 supports RangeFinder mode in its viewfinder or not. If so, this is the easiest way to manually focus anything other than macro shots on those occasions that you need manual focus, so I at least would not miss Live View except for macro photography. FWIW
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