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Old Jan 6, 2011, 9:31 PM   #21
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After holding the D7000 it is definitely a toss up between it and the 7D. I like the feel of both and although neither of them are perfect they both are very comfortable with easy maneuvering between the controls.

Are there any major differences I should consider between the two? Price is relatively similar and I know I will be spending a lot more in lenses once I purchase the body. What other things should I be thinking about before making a decision?
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Old Jan 6, 2011, 9:47 PM   #22
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well for you action, plan to skip the kit lenses of the 60D or d7000. The 18-135 or the 18-105 would not make a great action lens. The are a tad short, and with the 18-135 it is not a fast focusing lens. The body is just 1 part of what you need to decide on before choosing the body. What lens setup you need for the things you want to shoot.

You will want a true macro lens, they are make great facial portrait lens.
You will need a good wide angle lenses also, for the landscape.
And a good fast focusing zoom for the action, and a big aperture zoom if you are shooting indoor action.

figure out the lenses you will need then factor it into your budget.
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Old Jan 7, 2011, 10:25 PM   #23
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Both the Nikon D7000 and the Canon EOS7D are fine cameras and at this level of quality, it becomes a personal choice as to ergonomics, user interface, button locations, size and weight.

Both Nikon and Canon manufacture a complete line of lenses for all aspects of photography at all levels of quality (and price points).

As Shoturtle pointed out, with these cameras, you're not going to be satisfied using inexpensive kit lenses.

My suggestions, at this point are,

review the different types of photography you're likely to want to do and their relative importance, compare the lenses offered by both companies, their cost.

And, although you've mentioned in prior posts that you're planning on buying pretty much all the lenses you're going to need up front, frankly, I'd start with one or two lenses based on importance and then get really knowledgable with the equipment you have. From there, you can decide what lenses to get next as you may find that your interests may totally change from what you think is important today.

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Old Jan 7, 2011, 11:45 PM   #24
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If you were looking at the 7D you really should compare it with the d300, that is a nikon much closer to the 7D. The d7000 is a little higher end then the 60d, and behind the 7d.
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Old Jan 8, 2011, 10:00 AM   #25
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Thanks Zig and shoturtle. I wasn't planning to buy all the lenses up front just a couple that I would expect to use the most and as you said Zig, as I learn and want to expand what I am doing, buy more lenses to compliment what I have.

I am fairly certain I will end up with the 7D. I have been watching YouTube non stop on the 7D and some about the D7000.

What lenses would you recommend to start with. I would shoot macros and portraits more than anything else. Many of the macro shots will be shot indoors of my reptile collection and various animals/flowers/insects I come across while hiking. Portraits would be mostly of my family and dogs.
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Old Jan 8, 2011, 12:03 PM   #26
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[QUOTE=Rudd;1187488
I am fairly certain I will end up with the 7D. I have been watching YouTube non stop on the 7D and some about the D7000.

What lenses would you recommend to start with. I would shoot macros and portraits more than anything else. Many of the macro shots will be shot indoors of my reptile collection and various animals/flowers/insects I come across while hiking. Portraits would be mostly of my family and dogs.[/QUOTE]

Ah, another reptile guy like Edge in the Olympus forum.

Actually, I've done a bit of research on Canon wide angle lenses as I keep thinking of adding another camera to the arsenal. I've been comparing features, etc.
and in, my albeit limited experience, If I were to buy the 7D, I would most likely, have it equipped with the EF-s 15-85mm f3.5-5.6 IS USM lens.
In 35mm terms, this lens would give you focal range of 24-136mm. That would really give you a fair amount of flexibility in landscape, portrait and street photography. Another IMO, great lens is the 17-40mm L lens. As far as starting out, I don't think you could go wrong with either.

I don't do much in the way of macro and I know that Shoturtle does quite a bit. I think I'll let him give you his recommendation.


One way to research what you think you might like to have, is to look at the forums here on Steve's as well as photo storage/sharing sights such as Smugmug.com.

As an example, I store my photos on Smugmug.com. There, I can browse photos done by others in any number of ways. you can run searches for the type of photography you enjoy, then look at the images and the EXIF data. That will tell you the camera, type of lens used and the settings the photographer used to get the shot. It's a great way to learn as well as determine the kind of lens that may interest you.

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Old Jan 8, 2011, 3:46 PM   #27
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As far as macro goes, there aren't any bad ones. And most macro lenses can do double-duty as portrait lenses as well.

The big thing about macro lenses is the focal length. If your subject is animate, you don't want to get too close and risk frightening it away, so you should get a longer lens. If your subject is inanimate and you have good control of the lighting, you may want a shorter focal length so you don't have to be very far away.
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Old Jan 8, 2011, 5:20 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zig-123 View Post
A
One way to research what you think you might like to have, is to look at the forums here on Steve's as well as photo storage/sharing sights such as Smugmug.com.

As an example, I store my photos on Smugmug.com. There, I can browse photos done by others in any number of ways. you can run searches for the type of photography you enjoy, then look at the images and the EXIF data. That will tell you the camera, type of lens used and the settings the photographer used to get the shot. It's a great way to learn as well as determine the kind of lens that may interest you.

Zig

That is cool. I didn't know the information was on there. I have been looking at all the macro photos posted here and reading through the threads to see if they posted what camera and lens set up they used but a sight full of photo's with the information will be perfect. Thanks, AGAIN, Zig. You've been a huge help.

TCav, that answered my next question, thanks. What size lens for "animate subjects" and for the "inanimate"? This talk of "mm" has me lost.
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Old Jan 8, 2011, 7:05 PM   #29
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I would go with a 90mm at least, it will give you more working distance on things you run into on a hike that might get spooked away if you get to close.

The other option is get along zoom lens like the canon 70-300 USM, unless you want to pay the big dollars on the 70-300 USM L model. And add a macro conversion lens. It will give you close to 1:1 macro and give you 18 inches of working distance. The 70-300mm range lenses is a good outdoor hike lens, and good for shooting outdoor actions.
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Old Jan 8, 2011, 8:07 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rudd View Post
That is cool. I didn't know the information was on there. I have been looking at all the macro photos posted here and reading through the threads to see if they posted what camera and lens set up they used but a sight full of photo's with the information will be perfect. Thanks, AGAIN, Zig. You've been a huge help.

TCav, that answered my next question, thanks. What size lens for "animate subjects" and for the "inanimate"? This talk of "mm" has me lost.


Hey Rudd,

You're welcome. The only thing I ask in return is that you come back and tell us what camera you decided on buying as well as the accessories. And, what ultimately made you decide on that particular kit.


Good luck on your decision.

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