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Old Apr 1, 2011, 12:08 PM   #11
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Over heating issues with the A55 and A580 ?
I have seen zero overheating issues reported with the A580 (which is a more traditional dSLR design with an optical viewfinder).

Now, I have seen some overheating issues reported with the A33 and A55 (which use a unique Translucent Mirror Design that gives a full time live view feed to the EVF or LCD, while still making use of Phase Detect Autofocus). The A33 and A55 are unique in this area (able to use faster Phase Detect Autofocus while recording stills or video in Live View mode, without any interruption of the live view feed while focusing).

But, I can tell you that when we tested an A33 recently (same Translucent Mirror design as the A55 with full time Live View to an EVF), we saw no overheating issues, even after testing prolonged high speed bursts with more than one memory card). Ditto during other testing and shooting with the camera (no overheating was observed, even after prolonged usage with a variety of different Minolta, Tamron and Sony lenses).

It's more likely to occur during long video recordings in hotter climates with the A33/A55 models. The A580 shouldn't be impacted at all (I've seen no reports of any overheating problems with the A580). Here's an article about the issue with overheating after long video clips with the A33/A55 models:

http://www.popphoto.com/gear/2010/09...rheating-issue

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Image issues with the 60D What is Nikons best fully automatic image stailization camera for someone who is not very good at photography maybe the 7000 ????
What do you mean by "fully automatic image stabilization camera..."?

Nikon and Canon dSLR camera bodies do not have built in stabilization. If you want stabilization with a Nikon or Canon model (which can help to reduce blur from camera shake), you'll need to use stabilized lenses. But, note that many lenses (including kit lenses) are stabilized now. In the Nikon lineup, lenses with VR (for Vibration Reduction) in their names are stabilized. In the Canon lineup, lenses with IS (for Image Stabilization) in their names are stabilized. With the Sony models you're looking at, any lens you use is stabilized, including bright primes and third party lenses using Minolta A mount (because the camera bodies have stabilization built in).
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Old Apr 1, 2011, 12:21 PM   #12
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Default Is that a Cannon lens? Does the manufacturer....

Thanks for the answers and all the help ! Is that a Cannon lens ? Does the manufacturer of the lens make a big difference ? Where should I buy it from and do I tell them a Cannon lens ?
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Old Apr 1, 2011, 12:30 PM   #13
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Again, most kit lenses are stabilized. As a general rule of thumb, it's a good idea to buy a camera manufacturer's "kit" including a basic lens unless you have any special requirements (since they usually offer a discount when buying both the camera body and lens as a Kit).

For the 60D, you'll find kits including lenses like the 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS lens (which is a stabilized lens design). Many other Canon lenses are also stabilized. For Canon lenses that are stabilized, look for IS (Image Stabilization) in their name. For Nikon lenses that are stabilized, look for VR (Vibration Reduction) in their name. For Sigma models that are stabilized, look for OS (Optical Stabilization) in their name. For Tamron models that are stabilized, look for VC (Vibration Control) in their name.

With Sony or Pentax models, any lens in their respective camera mounts becomes stabilized due to body based stabilization systems, including third party lenses from Tamron, Sigma, Tokina and others that offer lenses in their respective camera mounts. But, note that stabilization only helps with blur from camera shake, not from subject movement. So, if you're using faster shutter speeds anyway, it may not make any difference if a lens is stabilized or not (and the conditions and subject types you use a camera for will make a difference as to whether or not stabilization is an important feature).

As for a lens manufacturer, you have to take each lens on a case by case basis, as all of the major manufacturers make some very good (and not so good) lenses. Don't go by brand (Canon, Nikon, Sony, Sigma, Tamron, etc.). Look at specific lens model to see how well it compares to competing lenses, as you'll find good and bad lenses from all of them.

From what I can gather from your first post, you've got a nice camera now (Nikon F4). What lenses do you have for it now? Keep in mind that lenses are *not* interchangeable between camera mounts. So, if you've already got some nice lenses for the F4, it may be a good idea to look at Nikon models that you can use them with.

But, I'd let members know what lenses you already have to get a better idea of their usability first (be specific about the lenses you have). Again, you'll find good and bad lenses from any manufacturer. So, don't assume that one brand is better than another in that area.
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Old Apr 1, 2011, 12:57 PM   #14
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A good walking around lens for me is the Sigma 24-70mm f2.8 HSM. It is also a bit pricey (700-900, depending on new or used), but significantly less than the Canon version and the reviews are quite similar on both lenses. It doesn't have stabilization, but then I find that it doesn't really need it in this focal range unless you're going with very slow shutter speed, then a tripod is the ticket anyway. Because it gives you the constant wide aperture at all focal lengths, it is a very nice, fast, low light lens when you can't use a flash. The only down side that I can point out on this lens is the weight, but that's usually the trade off with a lens of this type: wide aperture, hypersonic motor, pro build. If you need more focal range than 70mm, then I would definitely go with the Canon 18-135 IS if I could only pick one lens, unless you want to spend a lot more money. I would shop BHphotovideo.com, adorama.com or abesofmaine.com for the lens if buying new. Of course, you can always go ebay as well. I know that the next lens I'm buying is being sold by Adorama on ebay slightly cheaper than their web site and you get ebay bucks to use towards future purchases. Another option for used would be KEH.com. I bought my 1D Mark III there used and it was rated at excellent+ and it was really like a new camera. It had less than 2,000 shutter releases and looked brand new. All of the above mentioned sites have excellent reputations and will provide excellent customer service. I've purchased from all of them and have been fully satisfied.
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Old Apr 1, 2011, 1:19 PM   #15
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Jim,

You have not tested the camera at the temperature range the overheating issues is reported at, unless you live in south america, africa or south east asia. It does exist as some members in the southern hemisphere has reported it is brazil. Till you get to shoot it at 90+ degrees you can not say it does not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimC View Post
I have seen zero overheating issues reported with the A580 (which is a more traditional dSLR design with an optical viewfinder).

Now, I have seen some overheating issues reported with the A33 and A55 (which use a unique Translucent Mirror Design that gives a full time live view feed to the EVF or LCD, while still making use of Phase Detect Autofocus). The A33 and A55 are unique in this area (able to use faster Phase Detect Autofocus while recording stills or video in Live View mode, without any interruption of the live view feed while focusing).

But, I can tell you that when we tested an A33 recently (same Translucent Mirror design as the A55 with full time Live View to an EVF), we saw no overheating issues, even after testing prolonged high speed bursts with more than one memory card). Ditto during other testing and shooting with the camera (no overheating was observed, even after prolonged usage with a variety of different Minolta, Tamron and Sony lenses).

It's more likely to occur during long video recordings in hotter climates with the A33/A55 models. The A580 shouldn't be impacted at all (I've seen no reports of any overheating problems with the A580). Here's an article about the issue with overheating after long video clips with the A33/A55 models:

http://www.popphoto.com/gear/2010/09...rheating-issue

What do you mean by "fully automatic image stabilization camera..."?

Nikon and Canon dSLR camera bodies do not have built in stabilization. If you want stabilization with a Nikon or Canon model (which can help to reduce blur from camera shake), you'll need to use stabilized lenses. But, note that many lenses (including kit lenses) are stabilized now. In the Nikon lineup, lenses with VR (for Vibration Reduction) in their names are stabilized. In the Canon lineup, lenses with IS (for Image Stabilization) in their names are stabilized. With the Sony models you're looking at, any lens you use is stabilized, including bright primes and third party lenses using Minolta A mount (because the camera bodies have stabilization built in).
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Old Apr 1, 2011, 1:24 PM   #16
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Better the glass better the image. The glass means more then the body when considering image quality. The ef-s 15-85 Hards recommended is most likely the best walk around lens for the 60D, the sigma or tamron does not match it's image quality.

There are lenses with a constant 2.8 aperture, but they get expensive. And the cheaper 3rd party ones either is not as good with IS, or you need to give up is to get better results, and a short focal range. 17-50 vs 15-85.

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Originally Posted by go2shh View Post
Thanks for the answers and all the help ! Is that a Cannon lens ? Does the manufacturer of the lens make a big difference ? Where should I buy it from and do I tell them a Cannon lens ?
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Old Apr 1, 2011, 1:34 PM   #17
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You have not tested the camera at the temperature range the overheating issues is reported at, unless you live in south america, africa or south east asia. It does exist as some members in the southern hemisphere has reported it is brazil. Till you get to shoot it at 90+ degrees you can not say it does not.
I thought I'd made that part clear (that I have seen overheating reported with the A33/A55 models, and it's more likely to occur in hotter climates with prolonged video recording, even pointing to an article about the problem). ;-)

We didn't have the opportunity to test it that way (sorry, it's not that hot here yet), and saw no overheating issues during testing.

Now, as for the A580, I have seen no overheating issues reported, *period* (even from users in hotter climates). That problem (overheating in warmer conditions, mostly with prolonged video recording) is apparently unique to the A33/A55 models using Sony's Translucent Mirror design.

The A580 is a more traditional dSLR design using an optical viewfinder, and I've seen no overheating issues reported with it.
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Old Apr 1, 2011, 1:39 PM   #18
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no one really has tested any of the new sony in hot temps yets, that will happen more as it starts to warm in the northern Hampshire. The area's that are summer, are not big sony markets. So less reports yet. And with the A580 coming late to the party. We will see if there is any issues with the ibis and HD in hot weather. I doubt you will see any photo overheating issues with it. As all the overheating points to have IBIS on while shooting HD really.

It might be why oly limit the pen's HD to 8 min. And with their longer lenses, it disables ibis during HD. It does produce allot of heat during video, and the added movement of the sensor can add to the heat problem.

Here is user report about about the A580 and heat warning
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/re...ssage=37752878
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Old Apr 1, 2011, 1:49 PM   #19
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Awww... C'mon. If they had a problem, you'd have heard about by now, as Sony has sold a lot of those cameras.

As we've already discussed, I have seen reports of overheating with the A33/A55 models in some conditions (mostly with longer video clips in hotter climates, except for *one* report I've seen of it happening with still photos, which I suspect is due to a defective camera or heat sensor).

But, I've seen *no* such reports of overheating from the A560/A580 models.

As for other brands/models that limit video recording time; yep, reducing heat accumulation is probably one reason (not to mention restrictions on recording length to limit a specific model from being dubbed a video camera in some regions, requiring higher taxation).

So, when you start looking at limits imposed on other cameras for video recording length, the overheating issue with the A33 and A55 models does appear to be a bit "overblown" unless you're trying to film a movie without any breaks between scenes. :-)

Personally, I don't shoot a lot of video. But, if that were an important feature to me, I'd take that into consideration (video recording lengths available with different camera models, overheating issues with longer video clips, etc.).
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Old Apr 1, 2011, 1:52 PM   #20
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camera did not hit the stores really till dec, and the southern hem has started to report them.

I would like to see how long the sony can shoot is the middle of the summer in hotlanta when it is 97 and humid.
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