Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > What Camera Should I Buy?

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jun 14, 2011, 9:28 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 25
Default Canon, Nikon, ....what other brands compete?

I've always heard that when it comes to DSLR's...there are only two choices. You either go with a Canon, or a Nikon..PERIOD!

BUT, the more I look into getting my first DSLR....I've noticed that there are lots of people out there using other brands...like Pentax, Fuji, Olympus....

For the money, features, and picture quality.....are there any other brands/models of DSLR's I should consider when doing reasearch for my first DSLR purchase?

Thanks!
IQRaceworks is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jun 14, 2011, 10:19 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Bob Nichol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Eastern Ontario Canada
Posts: 822
Default

There are many fine brands of DSLRs on the market but Canon and Nikon offer the biggest choice of lenses and accessories, both from themselves and from third party vendors.
Bob Nichol is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 14, 2011, 10:41 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
shoturtle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Frankfurt AM
Posts: 11,348
Default

olympus is a fine brand, but they are more focus on the semipro and pro end with their dslr. And for their entry they put up EVIL camera's against entry level dslr. They use a 4/3 sensor, so they offer a 2x crop factor, so you get more reach with their lenses. And they are pretty good as a sport camera. Where only canon and nikon are the only other dslr's with a sport lenses.

Pentax aim for the entry and advance market, but really do not have a pro level glass. But they make a excellent entry and mid level dslr with very good low light performance.

Sony also has dslr, they brought out minolta. Their entry level are not that great their mid are pretty good, and they also have some fine pro level full frame dslr.

But not of the others have the lens option of canon or nikon.
__________________
Super Frequent Flyer, no joke. Ex Patriot and loving it.
Canon Eos 60D, T1i/500D, Eos1, Eos 630, Olympus EPL-1, and a part time Pentax K-X shooter.

Last edited by shoturtle; Jun 14, 2011 at 11:06 PM.
shoturtle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 15, 2011, 7:43 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 584
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by IQRaceworks View Post
I've always heard that when it comes to DSLR's...there are only two choices. You either go with a Canon, or a Nikon..PERIOD!
There is also a school of thought that says Canon and Nikon are
just cheap garbage and Hasselblad is the only brand worth buying.

Quote:
BUT, the more I look into getting my first DSLR....I've noticed that there are lots of people out there using other brands...like Pentax, Fuji, Olympus....
New DSLRs are generally fit-for-purpose. If they weren't, everyone that
bought them would bring them back to the shop and demand a refund.

Quote:
For the money, features, and picture quality.....are there any other brands/models of DSLR's I should consider when doing reasearch for my first DSLR purchase?
You left Sony out of your list.

As for "money, features and picture quality", the main manufacturers
produce basic models for the mass consumer market and high-end
models for the professional market. As the DSLR market is very competitive,
you will find that cameras from different manufacturers offer similar features
on models within a given price range.

Image quality from DSLRs is generally good, much better than small
P&S cameras. Differences between Canon and Nikon are small.
Sony, Pentax and Nikon DSLRs all use Sony image sensors, so
you can expect similar or identical image quality from all of them.

As Bob has already said, Canon and Nikon have a bigger range of
lenses and accessories. However, there is a reasonably good range
of lenses available for the Sony and Pentax DSLRs. Sony Alpha
models can use old Minolta lenses and Pentax DSLRs can use old
Pentax lenses for film SLRs.

Last edited by corkpix; Jun 15, 2011 at 1:36 PM.
corkpix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 15, 2011, 8:13 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,572
Default

Boy, did you open a can of worms!

I predict that this is going to be a fun topic to watch.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 15, 2011, 10:53 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Tumbleweed, Arizona
Posts: 1,381
Default

I'll add my 2 cents to the mix also....

As several have already noted... "Canon and Nikon have a bigger range of lenses and accessories". Let me address the lenses - possibly in a way not fully appreciated by everyone.

Canon and Nikon along with Panasonic have image stabilization built into their lenses. Pentax, Olympus and Sony have image stabilization built into their bodies. The main difference being is that with in body stabilization any lens mounted on the body will be stabilized. In lens or optical stabilization, you essentially wind up buying the stabilization for each individual lens.

Thus the lens manufacturers with lens based stabilization tend to offer lenses both with and without the stabilization capability.

That tends to drive up the number of lens offerings especially from Canon and Nikon, compared to Pentax, Olympus and Sony.

There are other variations that account for numbers of lenses being offered, and these tend to be:
  • In lens auto focus motors
  • Professional quality glass / build
So when you mix all of these combination of stabilization, no stabilization, AF motor, no AF motor, Pro Glass, High Quality, Medium Quality, etc. together, you can wind up with a lot of feature combinations across the various focal lengths of lenses - including the basic prime lens or zoom lens question.

In my view, the largest contributor is the stabilization method. I did a count a while back, that if you take the total number of lenses for each brand - Canon and Nikon, and then count the number of stabilize lenses for each, that the number of lenses generally tends to level out when compared to Pentax, Olympus and Sony.

Now to be fair, Pentax, Olympus and Sony limits their focal lengths to a maximum 300mm (400mm for Sony) in their current offerings. Pentax has a wide range of lens out to focal lengths of 1200mm in lenses that have gone out of production. So each brand is different.

Overall, lenses over 300mm (telephoto) tend to be specialty items that have limited appeal (based on physical size, weight and co$t).

Then there are lens brands that support most of the main mount types - Sigma, Tokina and Tamron, along with Zeiss, and a hand full of others. These brands build lenses that compete and complement with what the body brands offer. They may offer faster apertures, longer or wider focal lengths, etc.

So which one is best for you - depends on you, what and how you want to shoot, your budget, and a host of other factors - however in the end, it comes down to you.

Just as an illustration here, there is a fashion photographer - benjikan here on Steve's, that shoots fashion in Paris and his work can be seen in any of the major magazines. He can use any camera brand he wishes - and does. He has posed his favorite lenses that he uses....
... also, its interesting to see what he thinks about the cameras themselves.
Essentially, they are all good for general photography.

interested_observer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 15, 2011, 10:57 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 722
Default

Pay attention to Tcavs footnote ( the lens is the thing ) Pretty much all DSLRs will give great results if you have decent glass on the front and take the time to learn how to use them properly.
Do a little research up front before investing a lot of money, there are pros and cons to each.
eharrim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 15, 2011, 11:05 AM   #8
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,529
Default

The bottom line is this: there is no perfect camera and no perfect system. There are benefits to each and drawbacks to each. The problem is: the search can be overwhelming if you try to consider the whole universe of options. A much more successful approach is identifying your specific needs. We can then help you match those needs to specific attributes cameras/lenses/flashes etc. possess. That can help limit the field so to speak. The better you can identify YOUR SPECIFIC requirements, the better chance you have of buying the right gear for YOU. You have to be careful about getting caught up in features you yourself don't use/need. Some people need ISO 6400, others don't. Some people need image stabilization with a 28mm prime lens, others don't. Some people need good focus tracking performance, others don't. Some people need 400mm lenses, others don't.
JohnG is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:49 PM.