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Old Jul 24, 2011, 8:20 PM   #1
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Default *spectacular* SLR, great low light

Hi just gave my camera to my brother and need to find a SLR that is good for taking pictures of my interior design work. Also want nice zoom to take pictures of the eagles nest on my property.

1. Good for low light conditions
2. Good zoom
3. Easy to use
4. Under $500

I would prefer a compact, but not aware of any that have a nice zoom.

Thank you!
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Old Jul 24, 2011, 8:45 PM   #2
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Hi just gave my camera to my brother and need to find a SLR that is good for taking pictures of my interior design work. Also want nice zoom to take pictures of the eagles nest on my property.

1. Good for low light conditions
No sweat.

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2. Good zoom
That's doable.

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Originally Posted by katers View Post
3. Easy to use
Well, ok. We can probably come up with something.

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4. Under $500


(Each of the two lenses you'll need will cost more than that.)
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Old Jul 25, 2011, 3:03 AM   #3
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Ditto above you are looking at two lenses and they are not going to be cheap.
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Old Jul 25, 2011, 10:39 AM   #4
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It all depends on what you are talking about as far as "interior design work" and what kind of conditions you are going to be shooting under. If you are shooting stationary objects in places that don't mind tripods, you can buy relatively modest equipment (i.e., a less expensive, slower lens) with a sturdy tripod and get very good results. If you are talking about photographing rooms where you want a lot of depth of field (i.e., everything from the foreground to the background in focus), the speed of the lens doesn't matter. Also, you could use a slower lens with an off-camera flash that might also give you good results. You could probably get a camera and slower lenses for around $600-700, less if you go factory reconditioned. The only problem with this is that what you save on the lens, you'll spend on the flash and/or the tripod. In either case, you'll need to raise your budget some.
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Old Jul 25, 2011, 11:45 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katers View Post
Hi just gave my camera to my brother and need to find a SLR that is good for taking pictures of my interior design work. Also want nice zoom to take pictures of the eagles nest on my property.

1. Good for low light conditions
2. Good zoom
3. Easy to use
4. Under $500

I would prefer a compact, but not aware of any that have a nice zoom.

Thank you!
Hi Katers,

Are you looking for a point and shoot or are you looking for a DSLR? In and earlier thread in April, it seemed like you were headed toward a P&S. Has that changed now?
http://forums.steves-digicams.com/wh...ra-artist.html

Laurie
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Old Aug 3, 2011, 10:11 PM   #6
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Yes I got a P&S and that is what I just gave my brother. Now I would like to have a DSLR mostly because I would like to have a decent zoom. Too many baby eagle pictures I am missing in my backyard!
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Old Aug 3, 2011, 10:50 PM   #7
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I don't think a DSLR, is what you really have in mind. As someone has already mentioned, the two lenses you would need would be twice the figure you have in mind. In fact some DSLR lenses, for one! would come close to twice $500.

However there is a breed of cameras that are called superzooms, this is what I think you have confused with a DSLR (they look much the same). Olympus, Fuji, Canon, Nikon, and others make superzooms that fall into your price range, some with 24 to 500+mm zoom lenses. The weakness in superzooms is their smaller sensors, and relatively poor low light preformance.
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Old Aug 4, 2011, 12:40 AM   #8
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To reinforce the cost aspect, I don't have any lenses that cost less than your overall maximum (other than a cheap prime), and my telephoto zoom cost more than three times your maximum. Unless you can greatly increase your budget you're going to have to try another solution, and it won't be satisfactory.
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Old Aug 4, 2011, 1:26 AM   #9
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Have you considered going with a film SLR? You can get some great used equipment, for pretty cheap! I had two camera bodies, a wide-angle lens, a telephoto lens, a macro lens, a standard lens, a nice, positionable external flash, a UV filter (lens protector) and a polarizing filter; and I think I paid less than (or quite near) your budget for all of that stuff.

No, you don't get the instant feedback, like you do with a dSLR; but, if you keep good notes, you can see what you did well, what you did wrong and what you need to do differently next time. So you can still learn how to get the photos that you want, and that feels really good!

I used to only get the negatives developed (not pictures printed) and then I would scan them with a scanner that has the film/slide scanning ability. I would print the photos that I wanted and I knew that the images weren't altered with unwanted color changes.
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Old Aug 6, 2011, 10:41 PM   #10
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I want to stay away from film. Well I guess if I had to choose between the low light and zoom, I would go with the zoom. It would be nice to get some decent distance photos. Especially of the eagles up on the top of the tree.
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