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Old Sep 19, 2011, 11:19 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by bimbobo View Post
Anyway, now it's between the FZ150 and the SX40HS
The lens quality comparison alone should make the FZ150 the easy winner there.
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Old Sep 20, 2011, 9:23 AM   #12
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Thanks 1000 times!! this is the kind of answer that helps me most.
Not because you say FZ150, but because, I just wish a good camera, easy to use out of the box, and then with place for experiments with other stuff, P,S,A,M.. JPEG>RAW and so on.

I just wanted to "hear" that comparing the 2 cams "lens" the one could produce´better IQ in all-round environment and low light (meaning in the darkness of the danish winter)

More "comments" of this kind are welcome.
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Old Sep 20, 2011, 3:01 PM   #13
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If I was forced to choose between those two cameras it looks like you'll get sharper images with the FZ150 but I wouldn't use the RAW mode on the camera as from what I have read it really slows the camera down.

dave
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Old Sep 20, 2011, 4:57 PM   #14
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G'day again bb

We've just got an fz100 into the household & are very impressed with its changes from the fz28 that was unable to swim .....
Presuming that the 150 has similar 'fine-tuning' changes ... go for it mate

Regards, Phil
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Old Sep 21, 2011, 3:37 AM   #15
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If I was forced to choose between those two cameras it looks like you'll get sharper images with the FZ150 but I wouldn't use the RAW mode on the camera as from what I have read it really slows the camera down.

dave
RAW always does slow things down, but if it's as fast as the FZ100 (which is blazing fast for a P&S/bridge), there's no reason for concern.
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Old Sep 21, 2011, 3:38 AM   #16
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If I was forced to choose between those two cameras it looks like you'll get sharper images with the FZ150 but I wouldn't use the RAW mode on the camera as from what I have read it really slows the camera down.

dave
It was the same with the HS20.. RAW was very slow.

Hi Dave, nice to read from you again... Why are you still sure that the HS20 would be a better camera? You know my story with that cam and either I had a faulty model or it was very hard to use it as a beginner.

You can also write a PM if you do not want to "spam" longer about the HS20..

The thread is between the Canon and the Pana.. in this case :-)
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Old Sep 21, 2011, 3:39 AM   #17
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Why is the Pana FZ150 Venus processor slower tha´n the new DIGIC V for te Canon?

How can you compare that, please?
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Old Sep 21, 2011, 9:48 AM   #18
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Default Seems like a lot of us on this forum have your dilemma.

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Hi,
I am about to buy a new superzoom cam.

2 of them in particular interest me a lot.

If we do not look at all the "options", LCD size and all this stuff but look at the lens quality in general. Crips colours, sharpness, details and so on should I buy a Panasonic or a Canon? (of course not dslr quality) but in compact cams quality.

Please do not comment or suggest others than these 2 cams, as I already read lot of reviews and also had a Fuji HS20 which I sent back again.

Now the choice is between the new FZ150 and the new SX40HS.

The answer is only for lens quality and picture "result" not accessories or features in general.
Thanks in advance.
Arguably, the quality of the glass in current top end super zoom cameras differs very little, brand to brand. Coatings, maybe; lens architecture and zoom engineering, maybe; but Zeiss glass vs. Canon glass vs. Leica vs. Fujinon.vs. Pentax vs. Zuiko...? On the other hand, the type, physical size, pixel count and deployment of the sensor has a direct impact on noise, and processing firmware affects white balance, brightness, tint, saturation, contrast, dynamic range, luminance, etc. However, multiple reviews by credible reviewers of a given model generally concur, and currently there doesn't seem to be a great deal of difference between the image quality of competing models from different manufacturers. Except, of course, for my personal preference, which KICKS BUTT!

If you're skeptical of this generality, good for you. Run downloads of the sample JPEGs and/or RAW files found on most review sites through your post-processing software (or at least blow them up), compare them brand to brand and model to model, and decide for yourself. (OK, OK, DLSR fanboys and girls, super zooms may be useful in recording images of public bathrooms but simply have no right to exist in the same universe as DSLRs. Duh. They were never intended to.)

Photographers far more experienced and knowledgeable than I (the classification “photographer' is barely applicable in my case) indicate that the interaction of application, functionality and individual “fit” is the key to choosing among current super zooms. Refer to following quotes of posts from senior member “mtclimber.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
boula-

What subjects you shoot are important, because a super zoom camera does not make a good sports camera. That venue is best handled by those very expensive DSLR cameras with the huge lens that you see at the Olympics and at major football games.

What kind of budget you have set aside is important as you will need some money for cards and a case, etc.

Why Auto or Manual? Because certain cameras are more adapted to, or have special features that make a manual operation much easier.

The Panasonic FZ100 is a good camera, but it is numerically ISO limited. The simple truth is that photo taken at ISO 400 (the maximum recommended ISO setting by most actual users) provides good image quality, but with visible noise, and only 5" X 7" prints at best and computer use is recommended by most users, if indeed image quality is a real priority.

The Fuji HS20 is a good, but surely not perfect camera. It does indeed have a long zoom reach of 30X optical zoom, but in my experience, the added small. and sometimes multiple manual settings need for EXR operation, are not adapted well to your 70% Automatic work flow HS10 photo quality is good, but notice the "added element" in my settings description in the attached photo below.



The Nikon P500, at least looking at the paper specification list looks to be impressive. However, the camera has not even reached the dealer's shelves yet and we have only seen previews, no professional reviews, or user reviews of the P500. And not a single photo has been posted. So we are waiting. The best review that I have seen on the P500 has been from Imaging Resource at this link:

http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/CP500/CP500A.HTM

The Sony HX100 falls into the very same category as the Nikon P500. It is not on dealer's shelves, no professional reviews, no user reviews, and only previews. Here is a link to the one provided by Steve:

http://www.steves-digicams.com/camer...0v-review.html

Now the final camera that you seem to list in the title of your original post is: "550d." Canon does have a DSLR model called the "550d." Were you referring to the Canon 550D, a DSLR camera? I don't think that you are, as you have specifically said in you #2 post that: "...but i really don't want to have dslr if then i would have to change objectibe or to have big photo bag."

Super zoom cameras have always been a special interest to me. So, over the years, I have owned many of them. I realize that shooting styles can be very different. However, I have never had the need for a 4fps shot or higher. The Sony HX1 camera can shoot 10 fps, and I own one, but I have never used it for anything other than a hand held sweep panorama. The Sony HX1, the forerunner of the yet to be released, Sony HX100, has a Sony G class lens, which is Sony's highest lens rating, and is no slouchb bat all as the next attached photo demonstrates quite well. The HX1 is still available used and is selling for around $(US)300.00.



I have also be a longtime user of Panasonic's FZ series super zoom cameras. In terms of Panasonic, I began with the FZ1. In December 2010, I was in the market for a new FZ model. My possible choices were the FZ35, the FZ40, and the FZ100. Like you, after much research, I selected the FZ40 model, not the FZ100 model. I felt that the FZ100 model was not going to provide me with the image quality that I desired as the next attached photo show rather well. This is a photo of our family doctor, taken in his office during a regular appointment, without flash. In fact the ISO setting was ISO 3200, an ISO setting that, had the photo been taken with the FZ100 would have shown a whole lot of visible noise and reduced image quality.



Some super zoom cameras, such as the Panasonic FZ28, are much better specified to handle low light shooting where no flash can be used. That is why I asked about what ISO setting do you normally use. The attached photo above made with the FZ40, and this attached photo below, both required a numerically higher ISO setting to capture the photo.



Some cameras, like the Canon S3 and S5 are famous for their image quality, but have some really restrictive numerical ISO settings. Take for example, the S3 model had the highest level of image quality at settings of ISO 200 and below. Here is a good example of what the S3 could do when the ISO setting was held down to ISO 200 and less.



So, Boula, I think that you can better appreciate why the subject matter you are consistently taking does come into play when making a camera choice.

Some older cameras are notable as well. The Sony H9 had 15X optical zoom, but great image quality. Now 15X zoom is below your "16X or better" specification. Is that 16X or better specification "a line drawn in the sand?" The attachment below is a simple informal portrait of my husband taken in Automatic, using just the H9's built in flash unit. I am posting this photo to show you that certain cameras do very well indeed in the Automatic Mode.



And if you want brilliant color both the Panasonic FZ35 and the Sony H9 do very well indeed. The next attachment is from the FZ35 now selling at a record low price of $(US)214.00



The next attached photo is from the Sony H9 again:



So what is going to be your strategy? Are you going to wait for those super zoom cameras that have not yet reached the market yet, and on which we have no professional reviews, or user reviews? Or, do you wish to see the selection process speeded up, and make a selection of what is currently available?

Have a great day!

Sarah Joyce
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
Boula-

The Panasonic LX5 is a perfect example of why there are certain demands of inherent camera design. The LX5 is a real performer, but as I understand it, the LX5's lack of a reasonable "super-zoom" capability is only a "half-way" solution for your desires.

The LX5 has a larger than normal imager, which enables very good image quality. But a design that employs that specific larger imager, also requires a lens with a much shorter focal length. The result is that you have a camera with very good image quality, but with no real "super zoom" qualities.

At first glance, it would seem that all we need to do is to use a larger than normal imager in a good super zoom camera. This where we have to take into consideration good camera design as well. If we were to use that "larger than normal" imager, the required lens would have to be substantially larger in diameter, making the camera physically unbalanced. The Sony NEX camera series faces that very same design problem. Sony used a "larger than normal" aps-c sized imager, therefore the lens selection is both limited and very physically large in size. The result is that the NEX cameras look like they are cameras with a huge lens mounted on a very small camera body. Their largest lens is an 18-200mm lens that only produces 11.1X optical zoom, and it is monstrous in appearance when mounted on the NEX cameras. It is so large, Sony prefers that not to show photos of it for publicity purposes.

Panasonic's FZ100 therefore was a design compromise. It had to use a small imager. Otherwise, the needed lens would have been a real monster, and a camera that was physically too large and too heavy to use comfortably. Sony had run into that "too large and too heavy" problem before with their R-1 model which used an aps-c sized imager, but had its lens that had to be restricted to just 5X optical zoom to reduce the weight and size to a reasonable size. The lens, a Carl Zeiss design lens, was a great lens, but limited in the zoom it could produce, just to reduce the size and the weight of the R1 camera. The photo below illustrates very well the problem with the Sony R1 camera. The photo is of the R1 (the larger camera) with the Panasonic ZS series camera tucked in next to the R1 camera. Notice the difference in size between the lens size on each camera. And mind you that is only a 5X optical zoom lens used on the the larger R1 camera.

If the lens on the the R1 was instead just a 20X optical zoom lens, that lens size on the R1 would have to be enlarged approximately 400%!



So, perhaps you better understand how camera design limitations really do impact heavily on what the camera will look like, how big it will weigh, and how physically large it will be when held in hand. It is for those reasons that the Sony HX100 and Panasonic FZ100 are at their current limitations, without a very good prospect for a short term improvement that will produce a super zoom camera with a "larger than normal" imager.

So your strategy, to just hold off on your decision and to wait for further or future camera developments is probably a very wise decision.

Sarah Joyce
Other senior members stress the importance of personal “fit.” I'll paraphrase: “If it doesn't feel, handle and function in a way that 'fits' you and your needs then image quality and features are irrelevant.” So, after comparing various models for image quality (and I think you'll come to same conclusion I did) visit your local vendors and find the one that “fits.” After reading the posts in the thread “RESEARCH superzoom - pnsonic FZ100,fujifilm Hs20,nikon p500,sony HX100V 550d" that's the road I took. Of course, the one I chose KICKS BUTT!

George
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Old Sep 21, 2011, 1:41 PM   #19
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..thanks for the long answers..

I am not, and probably never will become a "pro" photograph, so my needs are basics, I like to have a superzoom, because I have been in situation where I could have use it, 35X is alot more than needed, 14-16X is too short.

24X is fine for me, so in this case the FZ 150 is responding to my need, just like the HS20, IF I had managed to use it, when I had it for 2 weeks.

My question last question was:

Venus Engine vs Digic V. together with Pana and Canon lens.

I do not expect to shoot RAW (in case of Pana) at start, but surely I will shoot in low-light with flash 50-70% of pics and video in winter. (built-in or mounted on hot-shoe).

I know that a DSLR will do a LOT better but I do not have money and "will" to have several lens with me.

Thanks for all the advices.. let's hope in more reviews between the end of the months when the FZ150 will be available in DK
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Old Sep 22, 2011, 11:15 PM   #20
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As i suggest Panasonic the latest one is AG-AF100 it's pixel clarity and adjustment of capturing picture size is awesome....
Thanks!
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