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Old Oct 17, 2011, 5:47 PM   #1
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Default Best Canon Powershot point and shoot for photographing clouds?

A professional photographer friend of mine says he uses Canon powershot point and shoot for his beautiful urban landscapes and photos of marches and demonstrations in the SF Bay Area. His pictures have great visual acuity.

I would like to be able to photograph couds and sunsets with the camera doing most of the wok for me on exposure if possible. Any thoughts?
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Old Oct 18, 2011, 2:46 AM   #2
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Canon S95 or if you don't mind a larger cam, the G12. The G12 is still small, but way too big for a pocket.
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Old Oct 20, 2011, 3:44 PM   #3
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anything you can affix a polarizing filter too should slightly darken the blue sky and highlight the clouds more. basically i think the G series covers that and should be capable of filter attachment. ive had a few of the g series cameras and always liked there interpretation of color.
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Old Oct 20, 2011, 7:21 PM   #4
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I have used a number of cameras take pictures of interesting clouds. The best point and shoot at that that I have used is the Casio ZR100 in HDR mode. I also have the Fuji F70exr, which has a pretty wide dynamic range for a point and shoot, but the ZR100 beats it. I think the HDR in that camera catches more details (dyanamic range wise) than the HDR mode in my Sony A55.
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Old Oct 24, 2011, 9:38 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertWMann View Post
A professional photographer friend of mine says he uses Canon powershot point and shoot for his beautiful urban landscapes and photos of marches and demonstrations in the SF Bay Area. His pictures have great visual acuity.

I would like to be able to photograph couds and sunsets with the camera doing most of the wok for me on exposure if possible. Any thoughts?
Hello,

I'm not trying to sound or be critical, but cameras are a tool that perform a function. It is up to the person holding that tool to understand it's capabilities as well as his/her abilities to control variables such as light, contrast, composition and framing just to name a few of the myriad details that go into the making of an image that is both compelling and has visual acuity.

I say this because your last sentence says that you want the camera to do all the work. It just not that easy. If it were, then we'd all buy the camera that you seek and we'd all be Ansell Adams.

Now, for a camera suggestion. I would suggest you go to a camera shop and try a few Canons already mentioned. The S95 is a great camera as is the G12. What you should be looking for in a camera is how it feels in your hand.
Is it too small or is it too big. Are the locations of the shutter and control buttons arranged so that they make sense to you and that you don't keep inadvertently pressing one or the other. Is menu system easy to follow and understand.

If you like the size, feel and controls of a camera, you'll enjoy using it all the more which, in turn, will make you take the time to learn how to get the most out of it.

In truth, as your professional photographer, has already proved to you it's really not the camera but the person holding it that takes makes the difference.

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Old Oct 25, 2011, 5:12 AM   #6
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I bought a 'Canon IXUS 115 HS' yesterday for my friend. I've not yet received and its in transit. May be I'll post few snaps after I get it :-)
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Old Oct 27, 2011, 1:23 AM   #7
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I'm not satisfied with the IQ of Canon IXUS 115 HS. My old (2005) Sony DSC-W5 gives me much much better IQ than this
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Old Oct 27, 2011, 3:53 AM   #8
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Hi CT'- I'm intrigued.... what is it about the image quality(or lack of...!) that disappoints you..?
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Old Oct 27, 2011, 5:19 AM   #9
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Hi CT'- I'm intrigued.... what is it about the image quality(or lack of...!) that disappoints you..?
1. Big difference in subject colors
2. Images are not sharp
3. I think images are having a trace of green (something like that)
4. See my DSC-W5 result @ http://forums.steves-digicams.com/so...ge-garden.html and I doubt IXUS 115HS can ever give such results
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Old Oct 27, 2011, 8:19 AM   #10
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I would like to be able to photograph couds and sunsets with the camera doing most of the wok for me on exposure if possible. Any thoughts?
Clouds are big, so you won't need a lot of zoom, but the zoom should start wide. You should look for a camera with a lens that starts wider than a 35mm equivalent focal length of 28mm. Failing that, (and perhaps even in addition to that) you should look for a camera that can accept a wide angle conversion lens. And, of course, something that can accept a circular polarizing filter, not just on the camera but also on the conversion lens, would be a good idea.

This all means, of course, that it won't fit in a pocket. Also, we're drifting into dSLR territory, so if you aren't adverse to spending >$1,000, then you'll certainly find a number of cameras that will work very well for you.
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