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Old Oct 30, 2011, 1:14 PM   #1
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Default New Canon T2i owner now need lens help

I finally got my Canon T2i with kit lens. Now I need lens help. Is there a lens that is good for pictures that are taken outside at night with little or no light at all? I am a completely newbie at this and have no idea so wanted to ask where I am sure I will find the answer.
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Old Oct 30, 2011, 1:55 PM   #2
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The T2i is capable of good high ISO performance, but trying with the kit 18-55 lens is pushing it.

You can go with one of the large aperture (f/2.8) standard zoom lenses, or large aperture (f/2.0 or larger) primes like the Canon 50mm f/1.8 or 35mm f/2.0.
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Old Oct 31, 2011, 4:55 PM   #3
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What are you trying to take pictures of at night? Knowing that will help. TCav is right that there are primes that will do the trick or Zooms that can help with framing the subject. If you are talking about landscape shots (objects sillouted agains the sky), one of the Primes would be great (My choice would be at least 35 F2 to get wide), but if you are talking about a situation where either you can't or don't want to zoom with your feet to get the subject framed right, an F2.8 zoom can help. If you want/need faster than F2.8 you will need to go prime (Fixed focal length). Steven
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Old Oct 31, 2011, 5:11 PM   #4
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Generally for such conditions you need a tripod.
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Old Nov 1, 2011, 11:55 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peripatetic View Post
Generally for such conditions you need a tripod.
Very true! Steven
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Old Nov 2, 2011, 4:44 AM   #6
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The 550d/T2i is very capable and using a tripod for low light is a must and that goes for any camera, Also depending on the amount of light you will be better using manual mode. As Tcav has said a prime will give you a wider aperture and the 50 f1.8 is a good starting point its the cheapest canon lens and its IQ is good to.
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Old Nov 4, 2011, 6:15 PM   #7
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Thank you all...I am just taking general family pics. I tried taking a few pics the other night while kids where trick or treating and it was not that dark outside but my kit lens just didn't do the job or I am too new at this one.
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Old Nov 5, 2011, 2:56 AM   #8
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There are three factors that affect exposure:
  • Aperture: The amount of light that's allowed to pass through the lens to the image sensor.
  • Shutter Speed: The length of time the sensor is exposed to light.
  • ISO Sensitivity: The sensitivity of the image sensor to light.
You can adjust any or all of these to get a proper exposure in almost any lighting conditions, but each comes with its own unpleasant consequence.
  • If you select an aperture that's too large, you can get a depth of field that's too shallow to get everything in focus that you want.
  • If you select a shutter speed that's too long, you can get excessive motion blur due to subject movement.
  • If you select an ISO that's too high, you can get image noise.
Your camera has a good range of settings for both shutter speed and ISO, but for what you're trying to do, your lens doesn't. You need a lens with a larger maximum aperture. The Canon 50mm f/1.8 is a good, inexpensive lens that will get you where you want to go, but because it's a prime (fixed focal length) lens, it doesn't give you the flexibility of a zoom lens like the 18-55 kit lens.
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Old Nov 7, 2011, 1:04 PM   #9
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We would have to see your pics and settings to see what you did but Tcavs post pretty much says what you need to do
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