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Old Dec 27, 2011, 3:40 AM   #21
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Default What camera should I buy

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Originally Posted by Koolpc View Post
I reckon it wouldnt be fast enough. Get yourself a decent DSLR if you are determined to go ahead.

Have you any suggestions on what camera in the mid range would be a good alternative.

Thanks
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Old Dec 27, 2011, 2:51 PM   #22
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PENTAX K-r Digital SLR Camera + 18-55mm Zoom Lens & 50-200mm Zoom Lens, this is my camera of choice as it is a mid range camera, and I hope it will be up to the job, as Pentax never change there lens design I am hoping to pick up some reasonable price lenses. But can you help with lenses i need to acquire for wedding photography.

Martin
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Old Dec 27, 2011, 5:54 PM   #23
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Try the Pentax K-5 if you can afford it way way better than the K-r. The K-5 has more dynamic range in images made at ISO80 and the high ISO photos from this camera are amazing to say the lest. Also 3fps till the camera card is full....... I am getting awesome photos with the K-5 using ISO 3200. I don't have a really fast lens or low light lens at the moment (using the 18-250 Sigma) and it is working very very well for me.

As for lenses I have always found you need at least something to 250mm if you get stuck in the back of the church in order to get those up close and personal shots during the service. I would suggest none of the set kit lenses as everything I have been reading suggests me to believe their are much better lenses out there for the camera. If I was going to do weddings full time I'd have the SMCP DA 50-135MM F2.8 ED (IF) SDM and the SMC PENTAX-DA*60-250MMF4ED[IF] SDM plus a SMCP FA 50MM F/1.4.

Just my two cents but for the way I work the 18-55mm is not long enough on zoom to be useful for me........ I'd be changing lenses way too much and miss way too much action. Good luck not having a heart attack when you see the prices on these lenses, its gonna put you way over budget but you'll be very happy in the results you will get from them.

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Old Dec 27, 2011, 9:47 PM   #24
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Here's the link for the NEX and other Sony cams.
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/sonynex5n/
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Old Dec 28, 2011, 5:07 AM   #25
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What people are looking for from a set of wedding pictures vary widely.

Sounds like their budget is 0 and your budget is 500.

I only do it for friends, and I don't charge. But I only do it for some friends - those who know my documentary style and want that, who don't want formals, who don't want trash-the-dress, who don't want fashion wedding pictures, etc. Anyone who is looking for a fairy tale wedding with pictures to match I insist should hire a professional with a track record.

After that however I build them a Blurb book and send them one free copy as a gift and of course all the image files. Last wedding I did the couple then ordered a bunch of books off Blurb for the family that cost them 500. No profit to me, but if I had been charging for that wedding I would have charged 2,500.

Make it very clear to them that although you will do your best you will not have pro-level gear, if your camera breaks you will not have much backup, if the light is poor your pictures may be poor, etc, etc. Lots of caveats. They are getting a freeby from a friend, not a professional job. Then you need to figure out whether they believe it or not and whether, if something goes wrong, they will be okay. With all that out of the way, go for it and have fun.

Get yourself a Canon 1100D with 18-55 kit lens (390), and a Sigma EF 610 DG ST Flashgun. (130)

If you practice enough that equipment will give you enough to get by.
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Old Dec 31, 2011, 8:04 AM   #26
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Thanks for the advice, have recently purchased the Pentax K - R to start me on the road of photography, the photo's so far have been a great improvement from my point and shoot, i just need to learn how to set the pentax up, so i am using it to the best of my ability, any advice of where to look would be usefull.
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Old Dec 31, 2011, 9:11 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madaway View Post
Thanks for the advice, have recently purchased the Pentax K - R to start me on the road of photography, the photo's so far have been a great improvement from my point and shoot, i just need to learn how to set the pentax up, so i am using it to the best of my ability, any advice of where to look would be usefull.
First priority would be to read the manual that came with the camera. Get comfortable with where to find information that you can refer to whenever necessary. Take it with you whenever you go out to shoot.

The Digital Photography book volume 1,2 and 3 written by Scott Kelby are reasonably priced books that provide a wealth of information on getting the most out of your equipment.

Visit the Pentax forum on Steve's. There are a lot of knowledgeable folks there who are willing to help.

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Old Dec 31, 2011, 10:03 AM   #28
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I wholeheartedly recommend that you get the PDF version of the K-r manual. It's easier to search through. I keep mine on my computer and on my PDA, which I take with me when I shoot. It's easier and simpler than carrying around the printed version.
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Old Dec 31, 2011, 10:46 AM   #29
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I tried to scare you off, but you've got the sand to see this through, so congratulations on the purchase! The generous posters on this site helped me through the preparations I made for my first wedding shoot. You might search for those threads in the Canon dSLR forum.

The recommendation I'd add to the others is to practice, practice, practice. In anticipation of the wedding scenarios, take pictures in darker areas (like anything indoors) and then note how they turn-out on the computer screen. Noise doesn't show on the camera screen.

Get an big external flash. Then wrap a diffuser around it, mount it on a light stand but keep it close to the camera. Connect them with a cord. This is absolutely necessary when the light is low. It also takes practice to get it right.

Another aspect of all this is the posing. Mastering the camera is only part of the game. I was thinking that my job was to photograph the event, but there are varying degrees of expectations for posing the subjects. And the photog needs to be a ringleader
(lion-tamer?)when it comes to ordering the guests around to get the photos done before the ceremony begins. They may be surprisingly non-responsive as they chat with family they haven't seen for awhile.
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Old Dec 31, 2011, 4:51 PM   #30
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Unfortunately, I am a little late getting to the discussion, and see you picked up the Pentax. Good camera, don't get me wrong, but now, let's talk about your SECOND camera. For professional wedding photographer, it borders on unethical not to have a back-up. The big day and the camera malfunctions, you drop a lens or bust a flash etc. HINT: bring plenty of batteries and SD cards!

What I was going to suggest was getting the camera that you learn how on, but on the big day, rent extra gear - any combination - powerful high end flash, fast glass, and even a second body...perhaps full frame, all of which are above your budget. That is where the problem with Pentax comes into play as rental shops are typically Canon and Nikon, so they won't have fast glass or flash for Pentax, or any other accessories that are brand specific.

What they are saying about wedding photography being very demanding is very accurate. Definately have a notebook planning specific shots so you don't overlook or be out of place in the event timeline. I would also amend the wedding difficult statement yo include ANY formal photography involviing people. Most of my photography is non-people (real estate, architecture, landscape, and product) whick people rave about. But, take a portrait and suddenly, everybody is a critic.
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