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Old Jun 10, 2012, 4:13 PM   #11
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the specs you listed have nothing to do with "best in low light" if quality is considered a part of best. for that matter, some would prefer better detail in low light pics where some would prefer less noise. the panasonic, canon and sony all have the same size of sensor - the casio hasn't been released yet as far as i can tell, and i can't find the info on its sensor size. the specs you listed show the casio as having the fastest lens, but it's not a mind blower.

no small sensor cameras are going to do a good job at ISO 3200, and imo not at ISO 1600, either, although some do better than others.

as far as a larger sensor, long zoom, easily pocketable camera with non grainy pics and good in low light, you may have to make some compromises. many of us have been looking for such a camera for years. my sx230 had less noisy pics than the panasonics i tried or saw samples from in its class. did the 230 have less detail? i didn't find the detail bad at all for its class. there seems to be a hint less noise from the sx260, but also maybe a hint less detail.

i would have suggested a micro 4/3 camera to you for the bigger sensor, but you'll need a pretty big pocket to carry even the smallest one along with a looong lens.

and look up "comparometer" on google, then select the cameras 2 at a time, click the ISO 1600 samples and compare away.

Thanks for that website the "comparometer" they just have the sx260 and the Panasonic ZS20.... They don't have the Sony DSC-HX20V or the Casio Exilim EX-ZR300.

The Canon is def better than the Panasonic with grain, though the colors are a bit more dull in those test photos. The S100 is better than the Sx260 but with far less zoom.
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Old Jun 10, 2012, 4:32 PM   #12
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you can change the colors to be brighter or less bright very easily in most cameras - i know you can in the 230 'cause i used to own one.
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Old Jun 10, 2012, 4:37 PM   #13
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here's a comparison of the 230, 260, panasonic and the s100 at ISO 800

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/stud...g_0098&x=0&y=0

you can move your cursor around the pic to see different parts, and you can change the ISO, as well.
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Old Jun 10, 2012, 8:48 PM   #14
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here's a comparison of the 230, 260, panasonic and the s100 at ISO 800

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/stud...g_0098&x=0&y=0

you can move your cursor around the pic to see different parts, and you can change the ISO, as well.
According to the link The S100 has the least amount of grain / best coloring, the sx260 is a close second.

Thanks so much!!!!

Wish I could see the sony...

Which iso do cameras typically use in automatic mode. Is there any features I can use with the sx260 to do something like HDR where it takes multiple photos and gets rid of the grain?

How do I tell the sensor sizes to compare, isn't a bigger sensor going to give me better night shot but at the cost of zoom capabitilies right.
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Old Jun 10, 2012, 10:13 PM   #15
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well, the s100 has a bigger sensor - that means least grain as a rule. it can mean better night shots depending. lots of people use a tripod or monopod and use a slower shutter speed, keeping the ISO around 400 or even 100. and the bigger the aperture - which means the lower the number after f/ - the more light will get into the camera, which also means better night shots. but in camera noise reduction can also make a huge difference, especially if it's well balanced so as not to destroy detail. the "enthusiast" cameras like the s100 do have a bigger sensor, but it's not that much bigger. it's smaller than a micro 4/3 sensor, and lots smaller than an entry level dslr sensor.

scroll down this page
http://www.whatdigitalcamera.com/tec...explained.html
till you get to the orange pic with 6 rectangles in it. the second to smallest is the size you'd find in the s100. the smallest one is about the size you'd find in most compact and many bridge cameras. amazing how small it is and what great pics some of the cameras take!

cameras use plenty of of ISO's in auto. i tend to limit my ISO in the settings to either 800 or 1600 for smaller sensor cameras, depending on the individual camera. and you can buy all sorts of programs to remove the noise from pics. neat image, noise ninja and others.
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Old Jun 11, 2012, 12:45 AM   #16
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well, the s100 has a bigger sensor - that means least grain as a rule. it can mean better night shots depending. lots of people use a tripod or monopod and use a slower shutter speed, keeping the ISO around 400 or even 100. and the bigger the aperture - which means the lower the number after f/ - the more light will get into the camera, which also means better night shots. but in camera noise reduction can also make a huge difference, especially if it's well balanced so as not to destroy detail. the "enthusiast" cameras like the s100 do have a bigger sensor, but it's not that much bigger. it's smaller than a micro 4/3 sensor, and lots smaller than an entry level dslr sensor.

scroll down this page
http://www.whatdigitalcamera.com/tec...explained.html
till you get to the orange pic with 6 rectangles in it. the second to smallest is the size you'd find in the s100. the smallest one is about the size you'd find in most compact and many bridge cameras. amazing how small it is and what great pics some of the cameras take!

cameras use plenty of of ISO's in auto. i tend to limit my ISO in the settings to either 800 or 1600 for smaller sensor cameras, depending on the individual camera. and you can buy all sorts of programs to remove the noise from pics. neat image, noise ninja and others.
Is neat image automatic or do you have to do that with every image? If it was automatic would I shoot raw format and then run it through there or save as jpg? The sensor between the S100 and the SX260 is really that much difference in size? It's weird that compared on compariator (whatever that site was) they produce very similar images but of course thats not night shots they compare.

Choices choices S100 SX260 or SonyHX20V/30V... I have a feeling in a year they will come out with more competition to the new sony with the 1" sensor and ill want to ditch this camera but I am traveling soon and this is the most important thing I will take back from my trip.
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Old Jun 11, 2012, 3:04 AM   #17
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i don't recall - you can grab a free trial to find out, i think.

i'm strongly considering the 260 right now. the low light samples i've seen were above most of its peers, the videos and pics look good, the zoom is long, it has full manual control and i liked the 230 - the 260 seems like it addressed a few things and improved them. i've just spent some time reading steve's review, the cameralabs.com review, cnet's video and a few other things.

btw, did you see the hx20v review on cnet? doesn't sound like it's as good as the 260 at low light from this negative: "Images get very noisy at higher sensitivities", which makes sense from the 18 megapixels crammed on the smaller sensor. also "Lens sharpness drops off at the sides of the frame". according to what i'm reading, the sony has faster response times and the 260 has slightly better image quality.

i see you agonizing over this decision, and i feel for you because i do the same thing. the things to keep in mind is that none of the cameras you're considering are bad cameras. it's just a question of what features you prefer, and even if you don't get what would have been the right camera for you, you can't go far enough wrong to be a problem.

i've been buying cameras for years, and it seems like there's always a trade off. the hard part is figuring what you can do without the best.
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Old Jun 12, 2012, 8:16 AM   #18
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i don't recall - you can grab a free trial to find out, i think.

i'm strongly considering the 260 right now. the low light samples i've seen were above most of its peers, the videos and pics look good, the zoom is long, it has full manual control and i liked the 230 - the 260 seems like it addressed a few things and improved them. i've just spent some time reading steve's review, the cameralabs.com review, cnet's video and a few other things.

btw, did you see the hx20v review on cnet? doesn't sound like it's as good as the 260 at low light from this negative: "Images get very noisy at higher sensitivities", which makes sense from the 18 megapixels crammed on the smaller sensor. also "Lens sharpness drops off at the sides of the frame". according to what i'm reading, the sony has faster response times and the 260 has slightly better image quality.

i see you agonizing over this decision, and i feel for you because i do the same thing. the things to keep in mind is that none of the cameras you're considering are bad cameras. it's just a question of what features you prefer, and even if you don't get what would have been the right camera for you, you can't go far enough wrong to be a problem.

i've been buying cameras for years, and it seems like there's always a trade off. the hard part is figuring what you can do without the best.

They all have great reivew and also their own problems, part of the issue... Thanks so much for your help. Also... Is neat image automatic or do you have to do that with every image? If it was automatic would I shoot raw format and then run it through there or save as jpg?
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Old Aug 24, 2012, 9:46 AM   #19
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I'm currently trying to decide between the S100 and the ZS20. Have both and am going to send one back. The S100 takes better pictures especially in low light, but the ZS20 is no slouch. The S100 is definitely smaller than the the ZS20, and seems better ergonomically. The ZS20 allows saving of more custom settings and has a huge advantage in zoom. Tough call.
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Old Sep 20, 2012, 1:25 AM   #20
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Long zoom, easy-to-pocket camera, grainy photos in low-light conditions, you may need to make some concessions.
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