Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > What Camera Should I Buy?

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Nov 29, 2012, 6:04 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,571
Default

I confess that I would not have considered using a 35mm or 50mm fast prime for "isolation" shots of an 11 year old.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 30, 2012, 8:59 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
tacticdesigns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 998
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ramcewan View Post
Your pictures will end up being stunning compared to the P&S you are used to
Yes. Because of a bigger sensor. Probably better high iso performance. If you use a zoom it will let you get to the cropping that you want faster. Autofocus is faster. And trigger delay is much less so the camera is more apt to take the picture when you want it to. And the ability to continuous shoot.

@OP if you're still reading this thread.

Getting a camera such as the Nikon D3200 can be a big step up in this situation for the above mentioned reasons.

If you don't want to get a faster lens, you can still try to shoot with the kit lens. It will be more noisey (you can't crop into the pictures much), but it can be done. And the pictures are going to be way better than most point-and-shoot cameras. [I've done something similar with a Nikon D5100 and a Nikon 18-135mm f3.5-5.6 lens. Noisey pictures. But still completely useable.]

I suggested the Tamron 28-75mm f2.8 lens because it will improve the end pictures. It can be gotten for around ~$400 and it can be used on a daily basis around the house, on vacation, etc. to try to shoot more available light stuff. But it depends on whether that focal length will work with where you end up standing at the competitions.
tacticdesigns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 30, 2012, 9:40 AM   #23
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TCav View Post
I suggest you consider the same two lenses I mentioned in my earlier post:



If you get close, you'll be looking up at the performers on the stage, so your best perspective will be from farther back. A longer lens will suit you better.
Thank you. The Tamron you linked to- does that one auto focus? Is it compatible with the d5100?

What are your thoughts on an everyday, prime lens? 35mm or 50mm?
minnie5678 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 30, 2012, 9:52 AM   #24
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3
Default

I am in the same situation and am now considering getting both a 35mm and 85mm 1.8.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ramcewan View Post
tacticdesigns/johng

I think you guys are coming at this from a pro perspective and everything you said is true, if you want the absolute best shots you are going to need two people, one shooting wide and one shooting isolation shots, or at least two cameras, or maybe a very expensive
zoom. I think you need to remember that bknk123 owns a P&S now and is looking to get something better to take pictures mainly of her daughter. Making those high quality isolation shots with a 70-200mm zoom is going to require skills that (no offense meant here) bknk123 doesn't yet have. Not only that but at north of $700 it blows the budget without even getting a body.

bknk123,

This is again why I would say get Nikon DSLR with the kit lens and a 35-50mm f1.8 prime. Most likely you'll be able to put the camera in a sport mode and fire away. The f1.8 aperture is big enough (wide, fast) that you will be able to get higher shutter speed without high ISO in the low light of an indoor gymnasium.

Your pictures will end up being stunning compared to the P&S you are used to and since your daughter is 11 there will be years to perfect her skills and use something like the 70-200mm f2.8 for those isolation shots if that's what you end up wanting to do.
minnie5678 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 30, 2012, 10:05 AM   #25
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,529
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ramcewan View Post
tacticdesigns/johng

I think you guys are coming at this from a pro perspective and everything you said is true, if you want the absolute best shots you are going to need two people, one shooting wide and one shooting isolation shots, or at least two cameras, or maybe a very expensive zoom. I think you need to remember that bknk123 owns a P&S now and is looking to get something better to take pictures mainly of her daughter. .
I agree the OP wants better photos. The point we're both trying to make is: better photos takes more than buying a new camera. You also have to change HOW you take the photos. I've talked with a lot of other parents over the years at sporting events - and this is not so different - when photos become really important to a person you have to think like a photographer and not like a fan. Specifically in this case - not trying to shoot everything in a 4 minute routine. For a single routine, shoot either wide or isolation but not both. Equipment aside, changing the WAY you try and shoot improves your shots.
JohnG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 30, 2012, 10:15 AM   #26
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,571
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by minnie5678 View Post
The Tamron you linked to- does that one auto focus? Is it compatible with the d5100?
Yes it does. There are only a few current third party lenses that will not AF on the D5100. Nikon makes more lenses that won't AF on the D5100 than Tamron and Sigma combined. For instance, Nikon makes two versions of the 85mm f/1.8 lens I mentioned; one is an AF-D which will NOT AF on a D5100, and the other is an AF-S which will AF. Early versions of Tamron lenses might not have, but in my post about used lenses, I only mentioned lenses I found that will.

Quote:
Originally Posted by minnie5678 View Post
What are your thoughts on an everyday, prime lens? 35mm or 50mm?
I'm a big fan of large apertures, but I think shooting 35mm or even 50mm will be way too short for shooting your 11 year old daughter while she's competing. For that, you should consider the 85mm prime, and even that might not be as long as you'd like.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 30, 2012, 10:16 AM   #27
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: New England, USA
Posts: 2,069
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnG View Post
I agree the OP wants better photos. The point we're both trying to make is: better photos takes more than buying a new camera. You also have to change HOW you take the photos. I've talked with a lot of other parents over the years at sporting events - and this is not so different - when photos become really important to a person you have to think like a photographer and not like a fan. Specifically in this case - not trying to shoot everything in a 4 minute routine. For a single routine, shoot either wide or isolation but not both. Equipment aside, changing the WAY you try and shoot improves your shots.
I think we agree on this, my point is that it is easier to shoot wide and probably the better option for a first time DSLR user.
__________________
in my bag: e-m1, 7-14mm pro, 14-54mm mk ii, 50-200mm mk i, 70-300mm
in my pocket: e-pm2 lumix 12-32
ramcewan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 30, 2012, 10:24 AM   #28
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,571
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ramcewan View Post
... my point is that it is easier to shoot wide and probably the better option for a first time DSLR user.
Her daughter is 11. Shooting wide is nothing. Yes, she'll capture her daughter, but she'll also capture every other 11 year old girl in the place.

An 11 year old is a small target. Her mother is going to need a longer lens.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 30, 2012, 11:19 AM   #29
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,529
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ramcewan View Post
I think we agree on this, my point is that it is easier to shoot wide and probably the better option for a first time DSLR user.
Let me be clear in my advice to the OP:

If your goal in taking the shot is to end up with an isolation shot of your daughter your daughter should be filling a bit more than 1/2 the frame IN CAMERA. Practice shooting tight with other competitors. Don't waste an entire season trying to crop out 75% of a photo - you'll be frustrated by the level of quality in the photos. The SOONER you accelerate the learning curve to framing tightly the sooner you get good results for isolation shots. Sure it's scary to do it - but it doesn't take long to get good results - ESPECIALLY with something like cheer (or gymnastics) where there is a set routine and the action is therefore predictable for a parent shooting their own kid where they know the routine.

Trust me - the first time the OP gets that shot where they can see the facial detail, eyes and expression of their daughter they'll love it. That shot will be worth more to them than 50 shots that were over-cropped.
JohnG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 30, 2012, 12:10 PM   #30
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: New England, USA
Posts: 2,069
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnG View Post
Let me be clear in my advice to the OP:

If your goal in taking the shot is to end up with an isolation shot of your daughter your daughter should be filling a bit more than 1/2 the frame IN CAMERA. Practice shooting tight with other competitors. Don't waste an entire season trying to crop out 75% of a photo - you'll be frustrated by the level of quality in the photos. The SOONER you accelerate the learning curve to framing tightly the sooner you get good results for isolation shots. Sure it's scary to do it - but it doesn't take long to get good results - ESPECIALLY with something like cheer (or gymnastics) where there is a set routine and the action is therefore predictable for a parent shooting their own kid where they know the routine.

Trust me - the first time the OP gets that shot where they can see the facial detail, eyes and expression of their daughter they'll love it. That shot will be worth more to them than 50 shots that were over-cropped.
Okay I guess I don't understand how you think the OP will get a good "isolation" shot with a $700 budget?
__________________
in my bag: e-m1, 7-14mm pro, 14-54mm mk ii, 50-200mm mk i, 70-300mm
in my pocket: e-pm2 lumix 12-32
ramcewan is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 3:40 PM.