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Old Dec 5, 2012, 12:38 PM   #11
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The other thing is that there is this trend away from CCD to BSI CMOS. It's supposed to be better for higher iso, which is handy for night shots. And for freezing action shots. I think the Canons that you just mentioned have CCDs where as the SX XXX HS cameras have the newer BSI CMOS sensors.
hmm is the canon powershot sx160IS better than the Nikon camera I stated above?
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Old Dec 5, 2012, 12:41 PM   #12
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Just some comments based on your wish list.

landscape - May want a wide angle lens. Now-a-days most point-and-shoot cameras come with a 28mm equivalent wide angle lens. Some even come with 24mm equivalent wide angle lens. 24mm being a wider angle lens than a 28mm lens. The wider you get, the more of the landscape you can choose to capture. Some older cameras (from 4-5 years ago) only had a 35mm equivalent lens, which made it harder to "capture the vista" or to get candid shots of people or groups of people.

evening shots - IS (image stabilization may help.) But also there is a trend away from the CCDs that a lot of older point-and-shoot cameras had / have towards this thing called BSI CMOS. CMOS is known for better high-iso performance. This can help in evening shots, especially handheld or action shots. But then again so can flash or a tripod.

sunsets - point-and-shoot cameras have a sunset mode. And some you can use exposure compensation to affect how a sunrise / sunset gets recorded. Having manual control would put you in complete control of the exposure so you can play more.

macro - Some cameras do this well. Some don't. Something that a buddy pointed out, some Sony cameras can do macro by just holding the camera up close to something because it has a really short minimum focus distance. But some cameras you have to actually put the camera into macro mode, which slows things down and sometimes you can get the framing you want. Depends on what you are going for.

food - ?

I want like slow shutter speeds like able to capture like water droplets of a water fountain, - Capturing water droplets might be better done with a flash, especially an external flash. But trigger an external flash with a compact camera without a hot-shoe can be problematic. Having a compact with a hot-shoe is better, but way more expensive. Having a compact with manual exposure control can make it possible. Or showing motion blur, having shutter priority can give you more control over that.

super zoom - Nice to have. How does this fit in with what is important to you.

Also, if a camera has Aperture priority or Shutter priority, doesn't mean that they are all the same. Some cameras have limited settings within it, like instead of having 6 possible settings or more, they may only have 3 settings, which may be better than nothing, but definitely is not the same.

Last edited by tacticdesigns; Dec 5, 2012 at 12:46 PM. Reason: typos
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Old Dec 5, 2012, 12:58 PM   #13
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for the droplets effect, Nikon camera have the scene called sports mode.
I think that the Nikon suits me more as prefer auto stuffs. Duh super zoom can let me take objects that Its far away. The Nikon have more scenes too.
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Old Dec 5, 2012, 1:18 PM   #14
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hmm is the canon powershot sx160IS better than the Nikon camera I stated above?
Both the Nikon L810 and Canon SX160IS use the older CCD technology, which in itself isn't bad, just not in line with what is happening with CMOS.

I tried out my buddies Olympus TG-1 with BSI CMOS and forced the flash to not go off and shot indoors in not so great lighting and I was really surprised with the results. For a versatile compact camera, I personally would try to get the BSI CMOS sensor. [Why would you want to take pictures in low light without using flash? To capture the scene without modifying it with your own lighting. Get a camera that can do that better, and you have a more versatile camera. IMHO]

And I haven't used that specific Canon, but it looks an awful lot like a Canon I tried 4-5 years ago. When I turned that old Canon to "A" (Aperture priority mode) there was only 3? settings to choose from or something small like that. So even though it had "A" mode, it was not as robust or useful. You might want to try that out before you buy it.

How much could you get a Panasonic ZS-15 or Canon SX240HS for compared to the Nikon L810 or Canon SX160IS?

With the Panasonic I'm pretty familiar with it. My dad picked up the Panasonic ZS-5 ages ago and when I put it through it's paces, I was really impressed on how well it got the lighting on fully auto mode. So much that when people ask me what point-and-shoot they should get I suggest the current ZS series camera. So my buddy down in Jamaica has a Panasonic ZS-10 and my mother-in-law has the Panasonic ZS-15. The added benefit of this camera is that it has the more advanced exposure modes. The only real downside is that its not a super zoom and no hot-shoe.

I've not really played with the Canon SX XXX HS series, cause when I suggest that camera and the Panasonic everyone has gone with the Panasonic when they went into the store to try them out. So I don't know anyone with the Canon SX camera so I haven't sat down and played with it.

Maybe someone with more experience with Canon can offer some opinion on that.

Last edited by tacticdesigns; Dec 5, 2012 at 1:19 PM. Reason: typos
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Old Dec 5, 2012, 1:46 PM   #15
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The price of the camera with the newer CMOS sensor cost around twice the amount of the CCD sensors. And I kinda prefer the so called DSLR look to it.
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Old Dec 5, 2012, 1:55 PM   #16
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About learning those ISO, aperture and shutter speeds it kinda confusing. Trying to learn though.
The funny thing is . . . that is the heart and essence of the camera and it hasn't changed after all this time.

Not that you need to know this stuff to take great pictures. I just look at all those amazing pictures people are taking with their cell phones to believe that.

But if you want to know more about photography, there's a lot to be said about understanding the tool that you are using to capture the picture. That and thinking about composition.
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Old Dec 5, 2012, 2:13 PM   #17
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The price of the camera with the newer CMOS sensor cost around twice the amount of the CCD sensors. And I kinda prefer the so called DSLR look to it.
A CCD sensor takes great pictures if there is lots of light. When the light goes low the images will be more noisey, or you can compensate with flash.

If you are swaying towards the CCD and dSLR look, can you find the previous Nikon P500 model still around? I've tried this camera and I was impressed with it. It has a pretty acceptable trigger delay. A lot of compact cameras have a long trigger delay (ie. you press the button and ages later the pictures is taken. By that time you've missed the shot.) Someone I knew had this camera and wanted to take cheerleading pictures. So I had my daughter jump up and I tried to see how many pictures I could take capturing my daughter at the top of her jump. This compact was pretty close to being able to do that consistently. I was impressed with that camera for that reason. I set the "U" setting for her so that when shooting cheerleading she just switched it to the "U" setting. But it also had all those advanced exposure modes too.

Or how much is a Pentax X-5? Now that camera really looks like a dSLR. It's a superzoom. It has BSI CMOS. And although it doesn't have Aperture or Shutter Priority on the dial, it apparently can do those advanced exposure modes. I've not tried this camera, but I would guess it is comparable to a Nikon P500.

Last edited by tacticdesigns; Dec 5, 2012 at 2:18 PM. Reason: typos
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Old Dec 5, 2012, 11:18 PM   #18
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Hmm it's ok. I will just stick to CCD cameras . People says CCD is good for Day time shots, is it true?
Saw a FinePix S4200 , is it good? The EVF is a plus.

Last edited by tayfelix; Dec 6, 2012 at 1:54 AM.
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Old Dec 6, 2012, 8:02 AM   #19
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"people say CCD is good for day time shots, is this true ? " Yes, absolutely, in fact, I have found that the still image quality of the CCD equipped Nikon L120 to be slightly better than that of the Nikon P500 which has the CMOS type sensor.
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Old Dec 6, 2012, 8:21 AM   #20
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Wow that's great
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