Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > What Camera Should I Buy?

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Mar 13, 2013, 10:47 PM   #21
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1
Default

I was going through the same thing. Go to youtube and put in Nikon 5200 vs Canon t4i. there is quite a few videos. Helped me make my mind up. But I ended up changing my mind and went with a Superzoom so I dont have to carry around a bunch of gear. I ended up getting the Panasonic fz200. But Best Buy doesnt carry it. There is the Canon sx sh50 Superzoom thats available at Best Buy. Just passing the info on. May not be the best. But you wont be lugging around heavy gear all day.
Blake08 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 14, 2013, 4:56 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,543
Default

The single most important factor in selecting a body is the availability and quality of the lenses appropriate to your needs.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 14, 2013, 11:41 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 142
Default

Another option you may want to consider is the purchase of the Nikon D5100. The Nikon D5100 has the same superb image sensor and processor as the high end Nikon D7000. Nikon has really dropped the price of this superb camera down due to it's replacement which is the Nikon D5200. The money you would save with the purchase of the Nikon D5100 over the D5200 may allow you to purchase the Nikon 18-105, the Nikon 55-300 and maybe even the Nikon 35mm F/1.8 and still remain within your budget range ? These three lens would make for a great all around combination. I actually don't think that you would be able to see the difference in still image quality between the Nikon D5100 and the Nikon D5200 unless you enlarged the photos up to the size of a house. The Canon will still have better video capabilities over the Nikon but the Nikon will still have a slight edge in still image quality.
surplusshooter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 24, 2013, 9:12 AM   #24
Senior Member
 
eugeniogurrea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Bahía Blanca, Argentina
Posts: 192
Default

Just a couple of months without keeping an eye on the market, and now I discover that a T5i has been announced, and very good reviews of Nikon D7100...

What else did I miss???

Each time I restart searching for a camera and lens, I have to start almost from zero...
eugeniogurrea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 24, 2013, 10:06 AM   #25
Senior Member
 
eugeniogurrea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Bahía Blanca, Argentina
Posts: 192
Default

T5i seems identical to T4i...now with STM kit...
60D seems not to have a replacement yet...

D7100 & D5200 seem to be "updated"...D7100 is a little bit expensive for my budget, considering I want to add a pair of lens to the body+kit...but I ike D7100 really much!
eugeniogurrea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 24, 2013, 10:20 AM   #26
Senior Member
 
eugeniogurrea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Bahía Blanca, Argentina
Posts: 192
Default

AF system in D7100 is superb...but it is also true that D5200's is more than sufficient for a still non-skilled photographer such as me!

Swivel screen is a plus of D5200...I actually own a Canon G11 and the rotating screen is useful...
Despite that, the D7100's screen resolution is great.

D7100 has built-in AF motor...I don't already own any previous lens, but who knows...

There are a lot of comparisson points...can't decide!

Last edited by eugeniogurrea; May 29, 2013 at 8:21 AM.
eugeniogurrea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 24, 2013, 10:38 AM   #27
Senior Member
 
eugeniogurrea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Bahía Blanca, Argentina
Posts: 192
Default

It seems as if I go with the D7100, the only thing I will miss is the rotating screen...I need to earn some extra bucks!!!

But as I'm not a pro shooter...is it woth?

Why is it so hard to decide???
It is always the same for me...even when selecting socks!

Last edited by eugeniogurrea; May 24, 2013 at 10:41 AM.
eugeniogurrea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 24, 2013, 12:59 PM   #28
Senior Member
 
eugeniogurrea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Bahía Blanca, Argentina
Posts: 192
Default

I'm reading the D7100's review in DPREVIEW (http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikon-d7100/22) and I'm surprised with Pentax K-5 IIs performance...but I know I'm not photo-wise.

Unfortunately Pentax's lens lineup is not so broad...(at least in Argentina is not so easy to find Pentax stuff)...
On a tighter budget, I can still think about Pentax K-30...

Damn!
eugeniogurrea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 29, 2013, 8:26 AM   #29
Senior Member
 
eugeniogurrea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Bahía Blanca, Argentina
Posts: 192
Default

For video shooting...Does D7100's AF system use contrast detection? or phase detection?

Has anybody handled D7100 and D5200?
Does D7100 feels "better made" than D5200 handling it?

I stiil have in mind how cheap I felt a D5100 with the 18-55 kit lens (I posted it was a D3200 but that was wrong!)...
And I suppose the D7100 should feel better...
eugeniogurrea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 29, 2013, 9:42 AM   #30
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,543
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by eugeniogurrea View Post
For video shooting...Does D7100's AF system use contrast detection? or phase detection?



There are three AF systems in use on cameras today:
  • Phase Detection - This requires a separate system in the camera (generally only found in bigger, more expensive cameras (mostly dSLRs.) PDAF works best for moving subjects and while panning. It requires large maximum aperture lenses, the larger the better, for accurate focus. Generally, PDAF systems can't be used while recording movies. (Sony's SLT series cameras are a notable exception.)
  • Contrast Detection - This uses the camera's processor to detect contrast in the image detected by the main image sensor. Because it uses the main image sensor to do it's job, cameras with CDAF systems don't usually have through-the-lens optical viewfinders. CDAF works best when both the subject and the camera are stationary, and because of the extra processing load, is not generally as fast as PDAF.
  • Hybrid - This uses special image sensors with embedded phase detection systems. This is an attempt to get the best of both systems, but mostly meets with limited success. In addition to multiple P&S cameras, some of Sony's NEX bodies and Canon's newer entry level dSLRs have this capability.
Nikon's dSLRs rely on PDAF before recording movies, and use CDAF once movie recording begins (as does Pentax.) Canon's dSLRs do the same, except for its newer entry level models, which use HAF while recording movies. Sony's SLTs use PDAF for everything.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 1:34 AM.