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Old May 26, 2013, 4:09 PM   #1
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Default New DSLR advice

A few years back I bought a Nikon D5000. At the time I didn't have the funds to buy new lenses and gear. I returned it and got an HS10. I am now in the position where I can start to look into getting another DSLR. However there are quite a few around and I am not sure where to go. I don't have a particular field of photography so I need something that can cope with most situations. My HS10 seems to do that but lack of decent dof control is something I want to address. I would also be looking to start astrophotography for which I have heard Canon are best for. Do I rule out the like of Sony or Pentax for instance?
Thanks in advance for your advice.
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Old May 26, 2013, 5:28 PM   #2
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Canon and Nikon has the best lens options. I have seen couple of astrophotography set up with the canon. And they have many adapter mount to attach to telescopes as well. Nikon have a them as well.
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Old May 26, 2013, 6:26 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by shoturtle View Post
Canon and Nikon has the best lens options.
Actually, the best lens options for astrophotography are catadioptric lenses, most of which use the T-Mount, which can easily be adapted to any camera body. If that's the route you want to take, there's little reason to pick one body over another.

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And they have many adapter mount to attach to telescopes as well. Nikon have a them as well.
Telescope adapters also use the T-Mount to adapt any camera body to a telescope.

The other types of photography you have in mind should have a lot more to do with your choice of one brand/model of dSLR, and for that, yes, Nikon and Canon have better selections of lenses and accessories, both OEM and third party, than other camera manufacturers. And between the two, for entry level dSLRs, Nikon's models provide better image quality.
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Last edited by TCav; May 26, 2013 at 6:30 PM.
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Old May 27, 2013, 11:24 AM   #4
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I don't want to disuade you but astrophotography is not simple and often ends up costing a lot in the purchases of the wrong equipment that is not up the the tasks.

If that is your interest drop over to astronomyfourm, a great place and it has a great beginners forum that can really help get you going with your initial purchases
http://www.astronomyforum.net/forum.php

<Summary>
Astrophotography is a whole different breed.
to get really decent results on DSO's, a camera with the sensor filter removed or replaced with one that passes IR and UV ends of the spectrum is required.
Canon produces the 60Da already designed for this task and many other bodies can be modified (around 300$) to do the filter replacement.
Once modified they are not so good on terrestrial subjects.

http://www.canon.ca/inetCA/products?m=gp&pid=15864

Scopes are of course important, but quality refractors like Takahashi's produce excellent results as do SCT's (the cat's, & mak's) and normal newts as well.
Of more importance is the mount they are used on,
a decent stable tracking mount like an heq5 or heq6 or an astro physics pier will run 1500$us-20,000$us.
They also need to be able to carry the extra weight of the piggybacked guide scope and guide camera that is used for auto tracking.

Actually for DSO astrophotography a dedicated peltier chilled asro-cam is sometimes best.
And a surprise, for planetary photography a CCD webcam is most often used, used to take thousands images in a short period which are then cleaned up , stacked and merged using some special programs designed for this.

Finally if you don't have a planetarium program, Stellarium is great and free!
With plugins it can take over and run most st-4 compatible telescope drives.
http://www.stellarium.org/
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Last edited by PeterP; May 27, 2013 at 11:29 AM.
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Old May 27, 2013, 5:54 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by TCav View Post
Actually, the best lens options for astrophotography are catadioptric lenses, most of which use the T-Mount, which can easily be adapted to any camera body. If that's the route you want to take, there's little reason to pick one body over another.



Telescope adapters also use the T-Mount to adapt any camera body to a telescope.

The other types of photography you have in mind should have a lot more to do with your choice of one brand/model of dSLR, and for that, yes, Nikon and Canon have better selections of lenses and accessories, both OEM and third party, than other camera manufacturers. And between the two, for entry level dSLRs, Nikon's models provide better image quality.
read what he wrote, he is not particular to any one photography type. So having a larger lens options is the way to go. And canon and nikon has more lens options then the other brands. Astronomy photo is just one interest not the only one.
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Old May 27, 2013, 5:56 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterP View Post
I don't want to disuade you but astrophotography is not simple and often ends up costing a lot in the purchases of the wrong equipment that is not up the the tasks.

If that is your interest drop over to astronomyfourm, a great place and it has a great beginners forum that can really help get you going with your initial purchases
http://www.astronomyforum.net/forum.php

<Summary>
Astrophotography is a whole different breed.
to get really decent results on DSO's, a camera with the sensor filter removed or replaced with one that passes IR and UV ends of the spectrum is required.
Canon produces the 60Da already designed for this task and many other bodies can be modified (around 300$) to do the filter replacement.
Once modified they are not so good on terrestrial subjects.

http://www.canon.ca/inetCA/products?m=gp&pid=15864

Scopes are of course important, but quality refractors like Takahashi's produce excellent results as do SCT's (the cat's, & mak's) and normal newts as well.
Of more importance is the mount they are used on,
a decent stable tracking mount like an heq5 or heq6 or an astro physics pier will run 1500$us-20,000$us.
They also need to be able to carry the extra weight of the piggybacked guide scope and guide camera that is used for auto tracking.

Actually for DSO astrophotography a dedicated peltier chilled asro-cam is sometimes best.
And a surprise, for planetary photography a CCD webcam is most often used, used to take thousands images in a short period which are then cleaned up , stacked and merged using some special programs designed for this.

Finally if you don't have a planetarium program, Stellarium is great and free!
With plugins it can take over and run most st-4 compatible telescope drives.
http://www.stellarium.org/

yup it can get really expensive.
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Old May 27, 2013, 11:53 PM   #7
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Just came to me, when you mentioned astrophotography
did you mean real sky object imaging as per my previous post or shooting starscapes?

If you meant starscapes then many DSLR's that can do clean high iso and hold their shutter open for 30 or more seconds or so with a fast wide lens will do.

Wide as in preventing star trailing
ROT is 250 to 500 / focal length (i.e. a static mounted 50mm lens can manage 5-10 sec before noticeable star trailing occurs)

If your exposure exceeds this you need to use a tracking platform of some kind like a DIY manual barn door, or a purchased automated mount.
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Last edited by PeterP; May 27, 2013 at 11:57 PM.
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Old Jun 2, 2013, 6:18 AM   #8
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Starscapes and long exposures as opposed to deep space. I'm leaning more to getting another Nikon but most dslr cameras I see are canon. I was also looking to get a good all round lens as well, have seen a Tamron 18-200 advertised.
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Old Jun 2, 2013, 10:39 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenzie View Post
I was also looking to get a good all round lens as well, have seen a Tamron 18-200 advertised.
Jack-of-all-trades-and-masters-of-none lenses aren't as good as multiple lenses of less ambitious zoom ranges, and are frequently more expensive.
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Last edited by TCav; Jun 2, 2013 at 10:42 AM.
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Old Jun 2, 2013, 5:39 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shoturtle View Post
read what he wrote, he is not particular to any one photography type.
I read what he wrote, and I understood it. I also read what you wrote.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shoturtle View Post
Canon and Nikon has the best lens options. I have seen couple of astrophotography set up with the canon. And they have many adapter mount to attach to telescopes as well. Nikon have a them as well.
I called attention to the astrophotography because you seems to devote a big part of your response to it, and I wanted to point out that, with the abundance of T-Mount adapters, it wasn't a big deal.

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Originally Posted by shoturtle View Post
So having a larger lens options is the way to go. And canon and nikon has more lens options then the other brands. ...
I agree, and I said so here:

Quote:
Originally Posted by TCav View Post
The other types of photography you have in mind should have a lot more to do with your choice of one brand/model of dSLR, and for that, yes, Nikon and Canon have better selections of lenses and accessories, both OEM and third party, than other camera manufacturers. ...
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  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
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