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Old Jun 10, 2013, 10:32 PM   #1
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Default DLSR "equivalent" to Sony's DSC-HX300/B (50x Optical)

Hello all,

I'm afraid I need help and I am embarrassed this might be a really stupid question?

I love architecture, especially industrial architecture. This though means I need a camera that will allow me to get the best close-up detail I can, but usually from a long distance away (like from down on the ground)!

I have been desperately reading about cameras as my old Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ28 has given up the ghost. The optical 18x zoom lens on it was so useful, that I decided my new camera should be able to get me at least that close.

I came down to either Sony's DSC-HX300/B with it's 50x optical fixed lens, or the Canon PowerShot SX50 HS. My problem is that I know I am always going to be wanting a DSLR though. My budget will stretch to about $2-3000 if I save up (including lens). I would rather spend it all on one camera rather than two though, but I would need one that will allow me to get a picture that looks as close as say a 24x compact camera would, or even closer if possible. I am looking at cameras like the Nikon D7100 (although the reports of poor quality control is concerning me). Perhaps a EOS Rebel T4i might be better then?

I appreciate that shake will be a problem at these longer focal lengths and I would appreciate good low-light capabilities as super zoom and a badly-overcast day, or even dawn/dusk shooting when there are no visitors around, is something I have to do sometimes.

Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated!

Mike
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Old Jun 11, 2013, 4:52 AM   #2
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Perhaps consider the Panasonic FZ200- it has the zoom you need,a nice light gathering f/2.8 lens throughout the zoom range,fast focus,fast burst,good movie capture,effective stabilizer...etc... and WELL inside your budget... and it even looks like a DSLR...

If you want equivalent zoom range on a DSLR you're going to need a wide angle lens and a telephoto lens- or maybe consider something like Tamron's 18-270 VR "all in one" lens- roughly equivalent to 27-400mm on an APS-C DSLR.
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Old Jun 11, 2013, 7:07 AM   #3
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Since you want to go with a dSLR eventually anyway, you might consider Sony's 70-400. It's the best lens in that zoom range. Pair it with the 24MP A77 or A65 (which use the same image sensor as the Nikon D7100, D5200, and D3200) or the 20MP A58 or 16MP A57 (which uses the same image sensor as the Nikon D7000 and D5100.) Plus Sony has image stabilization in the body.
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Old Jun 12, 2013, 2:12 PM   #4
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I have an FZ200 and I also have a Sony A65 with a Sony 18-250mm lens. That comes out to something like 27-375mm on that camera.
I like them both. I obviously get better resolution with the A65 (24 Megapixels vs 12 Megapixels). However, I think there is less distortion on the FZ200. You probably wouldn't have much distortion on the 70-400mm lens that TCav is recommending, but I think you would have it with the Tamron 18-270mm lens. It's not enough to bother me, but if you are a kind of visual perfectionist, it might bother you. Whatever camera you get, you might also think about getting Adobe Lightroom 5, which has some nice features which reduce/element geometric distortions.
If it were me, I would get the Sony A58 with the kit lens, and the extra 70-400mm lens that TCav recommended. However, there many other cameras that could fit your bill, too.
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Old Jun 12, 2013, 3:45 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robbo View Post
I have an FZ200 and I also have a Sony A65 with a Sony 18-250mm lens. That comes out to something like 27-375mm on that camera.
I like them both. I obviously get better resolution with the A65 (24 Megapixels vs 12 Megapixels). However, I think there is less distortion on the FZ200. You probably wouldn't have much distortion on the 70-400mm lens that TCav is recommending, but I think you would have it with the Tamron 18-270mm lens. It's not enough to bother me, but if you are a kind of visual perfectionist, it might bother you. Whatever camera you get, you might also think about getting Adobe Lightroom 5, which has some nice features which reduce/eliminate geometric distortions.
If it were me, I would get the Sony A58 with the kit lens, and the extra 70-400mm lens that TCav recommended. However, there many other cameras that could fit your bill, too.
Please note the "elimination" of "element". Darn, I should have proofread more carefully.
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Old Jun 12, 2013, 4:47 PM   #6
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I would also suggest the Bigma 50-500 on the Sony... It's an incredible lens now that I have both the old and new version with OS

Granted the OS wouldn't do much on a Sony since the anti-shake is already built into the camera!
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Old Jun 13, 2013, 9:15 AM   #7
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Hi Pastor,
given that you want to do architecture photography and switch to a DSLR eventually, I thought I would share a different approach to choosing you camera.

First, I would suggest that if you are interested in this field to always use a tripod (even the pocket version might work). Architecture photography requires great detail and you often shoot in the morning or the evening. With the limited light hand holding your shots is very difficult and unecessary. The building is not going to move so why not take advantage of that situation. So I would not make anti-camera shake feature a big consideration and rather spend that money on a quality tripod.

Secondly, you suggested two DSLRs and they will both do a fine job. The Nikon D7100 has actually higher ratings than the Rebel T4i:

http://www.claritific.com/cameras/Nikon_D7100/

but in the end they will both suffice. The much bigger question is which kind of lens you are looking for. Traditionally, the professional choice for the canon would be EF 17-40mm f/4 from Canon http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consum..._40mm_f_4l_usm
if you want to go with a lens specific to the smaller sensor then I maybe the EF-S 15-85mm would work:
http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consum..._40mm_f_4l_usm . You actually mentioned that you like zoom for architecture which is a great idea when you want to detail shots. However, wide angle shots are much more challenging to the camera and lenses. Often if a camera can do a good job in wide angle it will do a great job zoomed (given of course some mid range telephoto lens).

So, if you want to go the DSLR route and are interested in architecture photography, I would approach the decision by first checking out some good tripods:
http://www.manfrotto.us/photo-tripods-190-series
then looking at some lenses:
http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consum...ef_lens_lineup
and then figure out which camera makes sense in that setup.
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Old Oct 21, 2013, 5:42 AM   #8
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i need some help here. i have bought a sony hx 300 and clicked some pictures. in the gulf of bahrain where the water is in 2 different shades did not show up in the image !! i was really disappointed on this. i used superior auto mode. can someone guide me to get best quality pics from hx 300. even the other pics are lacking in sharpness and vivid colors.
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Old Oct 21, 2013, 6:46 AM   #9
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Can you post some examples?
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