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Old Jun 29, 2013, 10:19 AM   #1
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Default Getting dizzy going around in circles

Hello,
Just joined; admittedly out of desperation...sure would appreciate advice.
Looking for a new camera meeting the following desires: 1) Compact "point & shoot" type 2) Zoom of 20x (+/-)/ 3) AA+ performance in (beyond flash distance) low light indoor (mostly) settings 4) Excellent stabilization/focus; hopefully to include occasional use of digital zoom on moving objects 5) Don't necessarily need features such as gps etc but OK if not too complicated & 6) Would like to keep the price under $400, but OK higher if necessary.
After hours of bouncing from online source-to source, thought I'd found the answer in the Canon 260-280, but Steve's review leads me to believe/hope there is a superior alternative; especially with regard to the combination of 2 & 3 above.
If it will help, my current camera is an Olympus sp-590. It's bulkier than I'd like, 30-100 foot performance in low light is pitiful and photos of scenes such as grandsons football games are consistently JUNK.
I'm tired of being smoked by my wife's iPhone and refuse to concede defeat: yet!
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Old Jun 30, 2013, 5:35 AM   #2
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What you're looking for really doesn't exist as yet...
A compact camera that shoots at distance (good zoom) sadly doesn't let a great deal of light in due to the smaller aperture available at longer focal lengths- thus a higher iso is needed for decent shutter speeds (necessary for moving subjects) and higher iso settings deteriorate IQ. Also,the less light coming in slows down the AF system- again a requirement for capturing moving targets at distance...
It's a case of the "best I can do" for my requirements...
In the compact high-zoom bracket- rivals to the Canon SX260/80 would be the Sony HX 20/30v or the Panasonic TZ30/40- both of which offer faster AF speeds, though all three offer excellent stabilizers...
Beware however,that none of the above (including your sp-590) will give you good results in a "point and shoot" mode with moving targets at distance- switching to shutter priority mode (minimum 1/320th sec),auto iso,center area AF,multi-metering might give you more of a fighting chance of some decent captures...
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Old Jun 30, 2013, 6:53 AM   #3
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my sx260 was the closest i could come to your requirements, and it isn't as small as a canon elph, but it will meet most of your requirements with a knowledge of how to use the camera. i got decent indoor lowish light pics by using shutter priority and adjusting the ISO myself. i got some nice low light indoor pics handheld at 1/15 to 1/20 of a second using ISO 1000 - 1600 at f/3.5. neither auto nor program mode seems to come up with settings like that on their own on any of the many cameras i've owned, however.
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Old Jul 1, 2013, 7:52 AM   #4
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Really appreciate the feedback + education SIMON40 and pcake. Will re-read and attempt to digest everything later today. Sure does seem as though semi auto selections such as "Sport"/"Low-Light" on these point -shoot cameras could incorporate the techniques outlined at something short of arm & leg price...or memorize the settings when the camera is turned off.
Who knows, if I apply the techniques posted, I might even be able to live with the camera I have now (Olympus sp590)!
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Old Jul 3, 2013, 11:32 PM   #5
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both these requirements cost more. low light requires a faster lens or larger sensor - or both - and sports, which has faster shutter speed requirements that often don't work too well in indoor situations without a faster lens and larger sensor. the faster your shutter speed, the less light gets to the sensor, so you need either a sensor that is bigger to catch more light or a wider lens opening unless you're shooting with a fast shutter speed in low light.

low light has a workaround in a lot of recent cameras including the SX260, which is handheld night mode. that being said, i wasn't thrilled with the white balance for either the canon or panasonic handheld low light modes.
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