Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > What Camera Should I Buy?

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Dec 7, 2013, 3:16 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 3
Default Debating the best route to start

Hello.

I'm new here, but not new to photography. I've been shooting with an old entry-level Olympus DSLR and am ready to upgrade. My goal is to learn more, get better, and turn this hobby into more of a money-maker.

Obviously, I'd love to get the Canon 5D Mark iii, but am being much more realistic money-wise. And knowledge-wise as well, I still have a lot to learn.

So, my question: will the 60D be enough of a significant upgrade from my old E-Evolt, and in a few years upgrade again, or would it be more wise to go straight up the ladder to the 70D or 7D or 6D? I'm hesitant on that route because I'd also like to save some budget for a few good lenses.

And speaking of lenses, what's the lowest F I can get that isn't a prime lens? I like a zoom 1.8, but can't find it. I've never shot with a prime lens.

Also, I know that asking the difference between a Canon and a Nikon is like asking a preference between a Ford and Chevy, but wanted to welcome any other suggestions the experts might have! :-) Throw Sony's new options in there as well?

Thanks in advance.
Probound is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Dec 7, 2013, 4:42 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,544
Default

What do you want to shoot?
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is online now   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 7, 2013, 4:53 PM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 3
Default

I shoot a wide-range. Daily pictures of my kids, I've also taken some family, senior, and wedding photos. Ideally, I'd love to get into landscape photography.
Probound is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 7, 2013, 7:42 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,544
Default

Nothing you've said would indicate to me that you needed a 'Full Frame' body like the 5D Mk III. You can save yourself a lot of money, not to mention bulk, by getting a good APS-C body like a Canon 7D, 70D or 60D, a Nikon D7100, a Sony A77 or A65, or a Pentax K3.

What your choice should come down to is who has the best, most affordable assortment of lenses for what you want to shoot, and buy a body that those lenses will fit.

Nothing you've said you want to shoot would indicate to me that you'd need anything particularly long. Canon, Nikon, Sony and Pentax all make good lenses for event photography, but among them, Nikon's 16-85mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR DX AF-S is probably best. It's not quite as sharp as Canon's 15-85, but it's got a lot less chromatic aberration, which can show up when your subjects are in formal dress.

So I'd say your best choice would be a Nikon D7100.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is online now   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 8, 2013, 4:54 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Bangor,North Wales
Posts: 3,734
Default

I'd second TCav... in that a "Full Frame" might be a bit of overkill,with a good APS-C capable of pretty much anything you're likely to want/need- whilst saving a few quid at the same time.
Yes, Full Frame gives excellent shallow DOF if you want it- though so will APS-C with the right lens- and at least with the APS-C, you won't have to shut down the aperture as far to lose it- thus keeping more light all else being equal.
Whilst Full Frame offers superb low light abilities, the APS-C has come on in leaps and bounds in recent times- and will be quite a large step up in IQ over your ageing "E" series camera.
As for a fast lens that isn't a prime- Sigma's 18-35mm f/1.8 is getting some good feedback.
http://www.sigma-imaging-uk.com/lens...-f1.8-dc-hsm-a

As for the Camera...,the D7100 seems to be the most versatile "image capture" tool in it's class- though the 70D might be worth a look if video capture is also among your interests....

Last edited by SIMON40; Dec 8, 2013 at 4:58 AM.
SIMON40 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 8, 2013, 6:03 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,544
Default

A 'Full Frame' body only has a few real advantages over an APS-C body:
  • The larger sensor provides a larger Circle of Confusion, and therefore a more shallow Depth of Field, but the difference is only about 1 f-stop.
  • The larger sensor has larger photoreceptors for the same resolution, resulting in lower levels of Image Noise and greater Dynamic Range, but again, the difference is only about 1 f-stop.
There are other advantages, but they are less significant for what you want to do.

But some significant advantages an APS-C body has over a 'Full Frame' body are:
  • Less expensive, smaller and lighter bodies and lenses for the same image quality and Angle of View.
  • A greater selection of lenses. (Both 'Full Frame' and 'APS-C only' lenses can be used.)
  • Uses only the best part of the image projected by 'Full Frame' lenses. (The smaller APS-C sensor, in effect, crops off the outer portion of the image projected by a 'Full Frame' lens, that is often less sharp, dimmer, and has more distortion and Transverse (Lateral) Chromatic Aberration.)
There are some very good reasons for going with 'Full Frame' gear, but none of them apply to you.

... or most people, for that matter.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.

Last edited by TCav; Dec 9, 2013 at 5:39 AM.
TCav is online now   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 9, 2013, 1:51 PM   #7
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 3
Default

Thanks for the replies. That's good to know about the full frame. I hadn't really looked into them much because I knew they were out of my price-range at this point, but it's nice to know I don't need it anyway.
Probound is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 12, 2014, 7:55 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
terry@softreq.com's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 2,539
Default

You can buy a used Canon 5D "full frame" earlier model, 10 megapixel, for under $800 at KEH.com.

The best deals right now are used.

Take a look at Adorama too.

If your looking at an APS-C camera similar to the 60D, you can buy a used 30D in excellent condition for about $200.00.

If you're buying lenses, and plan to upgrade at some point, buy only lenses that work on full frame cameras. The old APS-C lenses don't work on full frame, and eventually (probably in about five years or less) there will be a great rush to full frame DSLR's as the prices move downward.

In a few years time APS-C cameras and lenses will be selling for a song because everyone will be upgrading to full frame.

If I was buying APS-C right now, I would buy a used DSLR and only purchase lenses that work well on a future full frame.

As for Canon versus Nikon, 10 years ago Nikon was catching up with Canon. Now Nikon has matched or in some cases surpassed Canon. However Canon traditionally has had the less expensive lenses. Personally I don't like the ergonomics of Nikon but then again I've been using Canon exclusively for the last 10 years (I had a Nikon film camera at one time).
terry@softreq.com is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:24 AM.