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Old Jun 7, 2014, 2:30 AM   #1
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Default camera with accurate color reproduction

I want to buy a non-dslr camera which can do accurate color reproduction. ..purple should look purple, maroon as maroon and not red, and so on....I am not a professional photographer with studio lighting, so it should work excellent in normal lighting at home

Can someone please help me here

Thanks
Chintu
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Old Jun 7, 2014, 3:48 PM   #2
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G'day mate

Every camera maker tells that their colour reproduction is 'accurate' - and every photographer can prove that somewhere - sometime - somehow this is not the case

To achieve a 'perfect 100%' colour reproduction is extremely difficult even for the most expensive of cameras ~ if I were to achieve what you're asking, I would want to create a controlled lighting setup [ie mini studio] so as to have 100% control over the lighting & shadows, and then via experimenting with a paint colour card or a collection of coloured objects, fine tune the camera's colour menu settings for the best result

It can be done with nearly all digi cameras - but it will take some time to get it 'right'
btw - when I say 'controlled lighting setup' I do not mean an expensive studio ~ it could be 2x good quality lights shining onto the kitchen table ... just something constant where you can recreate it again & again

Hope this helps a bit
Phil
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Old Jun 7, 2014, 7:36 PM   #3
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i suggest you check out the canon G15. my husband has one, and it's very good with color rendition. some of the ELPHs have good color, also.
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Old Jun 8, 2014, 1:29 PM   #4
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Any camera that allows the setting of custom white balance or can shoot raw files can work.
Provided you use a decent color target like the colorcherker passport for the first shot of each lighting condition sequence.

Using the cameras auto white balance option can come close, but rarely hits the actual color temperatures.
I use all three products below depending on the conditions, and if I am in the great outdoors or in the studio.

ColorChecker Passport
http://xritephoto.com/ph_product_overview.aspx?id=1257
SpyderCube
http://spyder.datacolor.com/portfolio-view/spydercube/
Greytag Mcgeath color checker target
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...cker_Card.html

Problem is most people want auto do everything cameras,
and there is no magic hammer that can do it all and get it right every time.
That is where manual control takes over.
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Last edited by PeterP; Jun 8, 2014 at 1:34 PM.
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Old Jun 10, 2014, 4:01 PM   #5
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Digital cameras only capture red, green, and blue light. That's enough to accurately capture almost every color in the spectrum. But purple can be a problem.

A camera will capture light with a wavelength of 450-400 nm, which is technically violet or purple, but it does so through its blue filters, so it only recognizes it as blue light. Thus, something that's pure purple (as in, not a combination of blue and red) can sometimes be represented in a digital photograph as blue.

It doesn't happen often, but when it does, there's nothing you can do about it, and there's no way for a conventional camera manufacturer to make a camera that will always capture the color accurately.

But my guess is that your best bet is to go with one of Sigma's cameras with the Foveon image sensor.
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Old Jun 10, 2014, 5:06 PM   #6
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Yes, but since the OP wants a non-DSLR that would mean they would be stuck with a 1000$ fixed focal length sigma Merrill
http://www.sigmaphoto.com/cameras/compact

They are nice toys if you can afford to spend that much on a single fixed FL P&S.

Otherwise use a color target and that gets you as close as you are going to get with a normal camera. Odd how those simple tool works for most commercial photographers.
But then they are willing to slow down and shoot the image right in the first place, not expect the instant gratification mediocrity of auto everything.
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Old Jun 10, 2014, 5:50 PM   #7
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This is from WikiMedia Commons:


Print that out as best you can, take it outside in daylight, shoot it with your best cameras, and see what happens to the purples in the upper right corner.

This is what I got:


This isn't about white balance. Color charts don't fix this. This happens to pros too.

I think the OP may be worried more than he needs to be, but the problem is real.
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Old Jun 11, 2014, 10:41 AM   #8
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Yes TCav,
no one was disagreeing with you about the ability of normal cameras having difficulty to reproduce some particular colors.
That is a fairly well known fact. Anyone who takes the time can look up that data on the web.
You have to make do with what the equipment is capable of.

However, unless the OP has really deep pockets I think it is plain silly to buy a Fovon sensor equipped Sigma Merrill fixed focal length point and shoot for 1000 bucks.
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Old Jun 11, 2014, 2:09 PM   #9
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Cameras are different. Here is what it looks like from my Fuji X-S1

Looks a bit reddish, but that is how it printed, also.
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Old Jun 11, 2014, 2:10 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterP View Post
However, unless the OP has really deep pockets I think it is plain silly to buy a Fovon sensor equipped Sigma Merrill fixed focal length point and shoot for 1000 bucks.
Yeah, well, I think it is plain silly to buy a 'Full Frame' sensor equipped Sony RX1 fixed focal length point and shoot for 2800 bucks.

How dumb are we?
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