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Old Jun 7, 2014, 3:11 PM   #1
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Default Camera for a new father

The posse here was so helpful to me 2 years ago in selecting a camera, I thought this would be the place to go for advice.

My wife and I were fortunate to welcome a new little one into the world a few weeks ago. I realize now, though, despite its bright lens my current Panasonic LX7 doesn't seem to as well as my wife's iphone 5 in low light situations.

We were thinking it might be time to step up to a interchangable lens camera that we can grow into as the baby grows and becomes more active. Chief on the desirable features list - fast, works in different lighting conditions, ideally compact enough that we could bring it on vacation with out constantly worrying about damaging or losing it.

Any advice would be appreciated!
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Old Jun 7, 2014, 10:36 PM   #2
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The Sony A6000 is a very fast system camera, good in low light conditions and compact. Good overall picture and video quality
Rudi

Last edited by rudimaes; Jun 8, 2014 at 6:21 AM.
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Old Jun 8, 2014, 3:25 AM   #3
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Congrats' on your new addition to the family.
I'm surprised your LX7 cannot match an iPhone in low light.
Is it not just a settings issue...? Can you post an example of one of the disappointing images ?
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Old Jun 8, 2014, 8:51 AM   #4
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I've shot two kids and now a grand child. Understanding the relationship between shutter speed, ISO and aperture is essential for getting shots of kids. Too slow of shutter speed is the number one mistake, resulting in fuzzy pictures. If your budget can handle it, the Sony A6000 is a great choice. For very little money, the Olympus EPM2 will give you what you need.
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Old Jun 8, 2014, 9:51 AM   #5
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Thanks for the advice so far.

The likelihood of the problem with the LX7 being me more than the camera is high to certain. Ive pretty much used the Intelligent Auto setting, but have tried playing with aperture priority set to f 1.4, and not having much better luck. I'll upload some photos when I get back to my computer.

As for the a6000, I like the compactness of mirrorless systems, but it seems once a lens is attached, they end up pretty bulky as well. Seems like browsing reviews online, entry SLRs like the Nikon d3300 seem to focus a bit faster and work better in low light. I know this ultimately comes down to personal preference in terms of size, but any advice would be appreciated. Not really having been out and about with a more serious camera, I'm not sure if there are considerations that become more obvious with frequent use.

Thanks again for your perspectives.

Last edited by higuy2003; Jun 8, 2014 at 10:10 AM.
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Old Jun 8, 2014, 10:16 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by higuy2003 View Post
Thanks for the advice so far.

As for the a6000, I like the compactness of mirrorless systems, but it seems once a lens is attached, they end up pretty bulky as well. Seems like browsing reviews online, entry SLRs like the Nikon d3300 seem to focus a bit faster and work better in low light. I know this ultimately comes down to persobal preference in terms of size, but any advice would be appreciated. Not really having be out and about with a more serious camera, I'm not sure if there are considerations that become more obvious with frequent use.

Thanks again for your perspectives.
The A6000 is one of the fastest camera's under $1000 and is excellent in lowlight conditions, 11fps with continuous focussing (and it does that very well). The Nikon D3300 is larger and heavear the the A6000.
But like you said it's a personal choice,
Good luck with whatever you choose,
Rudi
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Old Jun 9, 2014, 11:20 AM   #7
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aperture settings isn't enough. adjusting your shutter speed is essential when shooting in low light.
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Old Jun 9, 2014, 2:28 PM   #8
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If you can't get good shots of a newborn with an LX7, you must be doing something wrong.

They can't go anywhere or do anything. And why take photos in the dark. Turn the lights on. You're only 2 to 3 feet away.

You should be able to just use portrait mode and pound the shutter button.

From now to first grade, you need a flash. and 90% of your indoor problems are cured. Sooner or later, you'll figure that out.

You can spend a fortune on gear and the first thing someone is going to tell you is to get a flash for kids indoors.
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