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Old Jun 14, 2014, 12:10 PM   #1
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Default increasing quality of image FZ-150

Hi all,
I have a very old picture (1883) that I want to repair (digitally), then blow up to the original size (~18"x10"), and frame. I have photographed and repaired it, mainly using the clone tool, and it looks quite good, on my screen (even blown up). But what will it look like when I and print it (at 18x10), not just the repaired areas, but the non repaired parts. So, I guess what I'm really asking is, will the FZ-150 produce and image that can be blown up to the size I want ....... and ..... if not .... are their other methods to improve the final image, i.e. photographing the original in sections, and stitching the parts together.
Thanks,
.... john
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Old Jun 14, 2014, 12:34 PM   #2
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I'd pay someone to scan it. Anyone with a flatbed scanner or an all-in-one printer (with a built-in flatbed scanner) can do it, albeit possibly with two scans. Scan it at the highest resolution the scanner is capable of, stitch them together, and do your digital magic. Then find someone that can print it out for you.

I wouldn't bother using any camera to do what you're trying to do. You're likely to get distortion and vignetting, not to mention field curvature and chromatic aberration, which you may or may not be able to correct in post processing.
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Old Jun 14, 2014, 2:27 PM   #3
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I mostly agree with TCav on this. Scan it in sections. I would say three, so there will be plenty of overlap when you stitch it back together. I would not use the highest scanner resolution, as that would likely result in an extremely large file size. 300 dpi should be more than enough. It will still be a large file and take quite a bit of time to repair, depending on what you want your final print to look like.

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Old Jun 14, 2014, 3:19 PM   #4
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Scanning at the highest possible resolution can mean more accurate stitching.
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Old Jun 14, 2014, 3:53 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shinnen View Post
Hi all,
I have a very old picture (1883) that I want to repair (digitally), then blow up to the original size (~18"x10"), and frame. I have photographed and repaired it, mainly using the clone tool, and it looks quite good, on my screen (even blown up). But what will it look like when I and print it (at 18x10), not just the repaired areas, but the non repaired parts. So, I guess what I'm really asking is, will the FZ-150 produce and image that can be blown up to the size I want ....... and ..... if not .... are their other methods to improve the final image, i.e. photographing the original in sections, and stitching the parts together.
Thanks,
.... john
Put a 300 dpi image as a cmyk pdf or jpeg on a flash drive, bring it to copy - print shop and have them make you digital print with toner.
One down side is toner is a little shiny. Print it on either white cover stock un-coated or dull coated paper.
The Canon 7000 does a remarkable job, unless your a pixel picker.
These prints should be no more then a couple bucks each.

If it's not what you want then do as above.
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Old Jun 14, 2014, 4:39 PM   #6
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I suggest you stick with TIFF or PNG. JPEGs compress, and not in a good way.
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Old Jun 14, 2014, 11:55 PM   #7
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JPEG compression is not noticeable at quality levels of 95% or above, even after multiple edits and saves. I have used just about everything in the way of image formatting, and always go back to jpeg unless I need greater color depth.
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Old Jun 15, 2014, 12:19 PM   #8
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Shinnen is trying to reproduce an old photo (~18"x10").

You suggested that scanning at 300 dpi is more than enough.

To be sure, every suggestion posted here exceeds what Shinnen did with his FZ150, but if this photo was as important to me as it seems to be to Shinnen, I wouldn't scrimp or take chances with things I couldn't control.
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Old Jun 15, 2014, 6:39 PM   #9
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Hi Guys,
Thank you all. I'm only trying to do the digital part. I have already talked to an imaging shop that will print, and frame it, if I can create a good enough copy. This will save me $200.
Frankly, I never even thought of scanning it. I will try the 300 dpi setting on my scanner, and see what the photo shop says about the quality. How would you stitch the pieces together, just a regular image editor?
Thanks,
..... john
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Old Jun 15, 2014, 7:28 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shinnen View Post
... How would you stitch the pieces together, just a regular image editor?
Yes. Windows Paint could do it, but there are plenty of others that are more capable of doing the other stuff you need.
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