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Old Jul 23, 2014, 4:05 PM   #1
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Default adapting old lenses to FZ150

Hi all, I see a lot of the old macro lenses with various types of mounts on e-bay etc, some at very low prices. I might investigate further, if I thought they could be modified with a 52mm thread to fit my camera. Is this within the realm of possibility? Thanks, ..... john
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Old Jul 23, 2014, 5:55 PM   #2
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Those lenses are useful for cameras with interchangeable lenses, most notably cameras with short flange focal distances and large throat diameters like the Sony NEX and the Four/Thirds system.

The only way to adapt one of those lenses for your FZ150 is with a reversing ring, and to use that you don't really need a macro lens; any lens will do.
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Old Jul 23, 2014, 6:01 PM   #3
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G'day John

y-e-a-h ... maybe ~ more information needed matey

The FZ150 will accept a 52mm dia filter or close-up lens directly onto the lens barrel, and it can do so because the weight of such an item is very small
It will also utilise the Panny LW55 & LT55 via the use of the Panny adapter sold to fit the camera ~ these $300+/- accessory lenses use the adapter ring to keep weight off the tiny electric motors that do the actual zooming

It is also possible for you to purchase a 52mm > 58mm or 52 > 62mm Step-up Ring so that you can use 58mm or 62mm filters or close up lenses if you had some in the camera bag - and these [being light weight items] could go onto the actual lens barrel

So the big "but" is what can you get that will connect to the Panny adapter tube that the camera's zoom lens can then use for effective picture-taking??

If you are contemplating an actual film-camera macro lens - say an 60mm f4 macro - that might be for a canon or nikon etc for use on the front of the 150, then, without a huge amount of adapters & exposure adjusting, I would keep your money at home

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Old Jul 23, 2014, 9:25 PM   #4
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For the kind of use you are talking about, as TCav says, you don't need a macro lens. You would want a large aperture, manual lens, such as a 50/1.4. Even so, you will likely get a lot of vignetting, and the weight of the lens on the end of your camera's lens barrel won't do it any good.

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Old Jul 24, 2014, 10:26 AM   #5
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Thanks guys, I'm sorry for asking such a vague question, but I'm afraid I don't really know what many of the terms used mean. When I look at these lenses there is always an array of numbers attached, which mean absolutely nothing to me, i.e. 50/1.4. (By the way, I often see the aperature rating of the lens cited. Why is that important?) I won't fork out $300 for the proper adapter. (By the way how does this thing attach to the camera .... is it independent of the barrel?) Which means that I'm stuck with attaching something light weight to the barrel. I'm a little confused by this comment "For the kind of use you are talking about, as TCav says, you don't need a macro lens." I'm trying to take close ups. I've been looking at diopter sets, and double element lens (250d and 500d and some Nikons). Aren't these considered macro lenses? .... john
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Old Jul 24, 2014, 11:09 AM   #6
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Using an interchangeable type lens with a fixed lens camera for macro work (or with another interchangeable lens on a SLR) is done by reversing the lens, using a reversing ring, which is nothing more than a filter adapter ring with male threads on both sides. This turns a standard prime lens into what is essentially a macro lens.
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Old Jul 24, 2014, 11:46 AM   #7
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Ahh ....... so, it's a matter of getting the right size reversing ring, whatever the business end of the lens is to the business end of the FZ150, a lens that has the right magnification, and not too heavy???? Is the aperture rating of the lens important? .... john
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Old Jul 24, 2014, 12:25 PM   #8
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Larger apertures allow more light, and at the kinds of magnification you can get with this arrangement, you need all the light you can get.
Since the optics of a camera lens are designed to gather light from a large objective lens, and project it on to the sensor, at a fixed distance, from a smaller lens, when you reverse the optical direction, you end up using the small end of the lens as the objective. It isn't designed for that, so you will get vignetting.
I have used this technique, but only because I already had the equipment available. For serious macro and micro work, I would look for another solution.

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Old Jul 24, 2014, 6:22 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shinnen View Post
Thanks guys, I'm sorry for asking such a vague question, but I'm afraid I don't really know what many of the terms used mean. .... john
G'day John

As well as us mates helping you out with info & stuff, maybe you will discover more about lenses etc via one of the Wiki sites ~ and the multiple sources of info will speed up the answers

Since most of your queries relate to macro / closeups, may I add a bit more. I am not going to get into lens focal lengths or apertures - you can chase that side of things yourself

I had a similar conversation recently with another mate of mine who also was trying to work out a similar problem

Reversing rings for using SLR camera lenses on your FZ are of no value to you & your efforts
1- they only work with SLR cameras & interchangeable lenses
2- they only work at extreme closeups

Okay- as you know, for a lens to focus closer than infinity, the lens itself has to move away from the film / sensor ~ you can see this happen every time you whiz the focus ring around a lens. Most camera lenses stop their close focus at about 2ft, and if you want to come closer, you have to activate something else

For the SLR user this is either of 2 things ... 1- buy a dedicated macro lens where the focus ring continues close focus down to about 4 inches; or 2- use the 18-55 lens attached to either a focus bellows or to some hollow extension rings - each forces the lens away from the camera body, thus achieving close focus

The problem then is that there is so much extension of the lens that it touches the subject just as it gets into focus. Many years ago, photographers realised that every lens has a fixed distance between the back of the lens and the film itself - so in came reversing rings so that when using these devices the lens did focus before touching the subject

And in doing so, all the electrical connections in the lens were lost as the lens was now back-to-front, so it meant that everything now had to be done manually = very slowly = very carefully = indoors away from the wind, etc etc etc

BUT it only works with an SLR camera - and you do not have an SLR [coz the FZ is better ]

Most of the superzoom camera companies make a hollow tube that attaches to the body of the camera and the zoom lens can zoom in & out inside the tube. On the end of the tube is a thread - usually about 55mm diameter ... thus allowing 55mm dia filters, close up lenses etc to be mounted and their weight is taken by the body -not- the movable lens

Here's a link to a site selling these adapter tubes and accessory lenses
http://www.safari-guide.co.uk/panaso...rsion-lens.php

so you can easily see what's available

For you - the best you can do [and this is what I do regularly] is to use a close-up lens [mine is the Canon 250D ~ focussing at 250mm from the subject] with the camera on a focussing rail on the tripod and use the actual zoom to alter the size of the image in the frame

I'll try to get a pic of the setup and apppend it to this post later today
Phil
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Old Jul 24, 2014, 7:36 PM   #10
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G'day John

For you - the best you can do [and this is what I do regularly] is to use a close-up lens [mine is the Canon 250D ~ focussing at 250mm from the subject] with the camera on a focussing rail on the tripod and use the actual zoom to alter the size of the image in the frame
I'll try to get a pic of the setup and apppend it to this post later today


Okay some more information for you ...

I keep mentioning the Panny Adapter tube for use with the Panny LC55 &/or other accessory lenses. This screws into the camera body inside the shiny lens mount that is labelled with --- Power O.I.S --- Other camera makers get the user to remove the shiny ring equivalent before attaching the adapter tube

However, Panny, unlike many other camera makers does put a filter thread onto the lens barrel - and in this case it is 52mm diameter ~ so you and I can attach a light-weight filter only directly onto the lens barrel

Okay - here's my setup when doing closeups etc

1- the FZ100 camera zoomed out a bit, with the Canon 250D closeup lens in place and the camera is attached to the focussing rail, which is then attached to the tripod


2- the focussing rail fully extended forwards some 4" / 100mm


3- the focussing rail fully extended backwards ... the tripod is not moved


4- an image of some barbed wire over a tree stump - 1x or 2x zoom taken at 250mm which is the focal length of the 250D close up lens


5- the same subject, now at 10x zoom - camera still at 250mm from the subject with a minor movement [about 15mm] of the camera on the focussing rail on the tripod to balance the forward movement of the zoom lens


Hope this helps a bit
Phil
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